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Copyright, 1887, by Eussblt. Publishing Compamy.1 [Entered at tbe P O. at Boston as second-class mattes. 



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CONTENTS. 



MARCH 

(Illustrated by Louis Meynelle.) 

WHAT HAPPENED TO LLOYD'S TOAD 

(Mluslraled by \V. L. Sheppard.) 

THE POP FAMILY Penn Axdinck 

(Illustrate by Maud Humphrey.) 

I WONDER IF BABY EVER THINKS . . . R. W. L . . . 

(Illustrated by Jessie C. Shepherd. ) 

FRANKIE'S LETTER . Frankie . . . 

(Illustrated by Jessie McDermoii.) 

CAUGHT IN THEIR OWN TRAP M. C. W. 1! . 

(Illustrated by F. T. Merrill.) 



Sydney Dayre 131 

Emma C. Dowd ...... 132 

• • • • '34 

• • • '37 
.... 139 
.... 140 

. . 142 



Emma C. Down 



'47 



THE CREEPMOUSE Anna M. Pratt 

(Illustrated by Miss E. S. Tucker.) 

GRANMOTHER'S STORY . J. D. K 144 

(Illustrated by H. M. Beal. ) 

HOW THE BABIES RODE 

(Illustrated by F. T. Merrill. ) 

POLLY'S PUPIL Sydney Dayre 149 

(Illustrated by Julia Robinson. . 

THREE LITTLE MAIDS FROM CANADA (Illustration) Miss 1-.'. S. Tucker 15! 
MOLLY AND HER KID Anna M. Pratt 152 

(Illustrated by Carl Hirschbeig.) 



E. M. A. 



THE STORY OF THE GANDER .... 

(Illustrated by F. W. Freer) 

MARCH L. B. C 

(Illustrated by Lizbeth B. Coinins.) 

HOW WE GIRLS HELPED A. M 158 

(Illustrated by J. H. Hatfield and Allred Matthews.) 



'54 

'57 



The Illustrative Department under the direction of. Mr. George T. Andrew. 

OUR LITTLE ONES AND THE NURSERY, 



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MARCH. 




I58S 

Copyright, 1888, by Russell Publishing Company, 



No. 5. 



MARCH. 

He puffs in my face, and tangles my hair, 

And laughs at me 

In his saucy glee, 
As he looks to see if I seem to care ; 
He steals behind me and jerks my hat 

While I am at play, 

And flirts it away, — 
Perhaps he thinks there is fun in that. 
He reddens my cheeks, and even tries 
To fling the sand in my very eyes, 
And out of my ruffles he takes the starch,- 
An impudent fellow is he — that March ! 



But I can forgive him everything, 

For, hark ! — do you hear 

A silvery, clear, 

Little chirping note 

On the air afloat ? — 
He's teaching; the earliest birds to sins;, 
And then he will send them on the wing 
To tell the little ones, far and near, 



132 



WHAT HAPPENED TO LLOYD'S TOAD. 



To be on the watch for the thry flowers, 
That he has waiting for April showers. 

Crocuses, violets, 

Come, little dainty pets, 
Tell, when your pretty wee buds peep out, 
To see what the stirring is all about, 
That March, with all his bluster and roar. 
Is only hurrying on before, 
The sweetest message of all to brins;. — 
She's coming — coming — beautiful spring! 

SYDNEY DAYRE. 




WHAT HAPPENED TO LLOYD'S TOAD. 



Lloyd was fond of all the creatures that lived in the garden, from 
the robins high up in the apple tree to the little ants that built their 
homes in the gravel walks. He was always careful not to harm any 
of them, but some of them he thought more interesting than others. 
There was a toad that he called his own, and he fed it with crumbs 
every day. He liked to watch it as it hopped about among the 
plants, darting out its bright red tongue to catch any small insects 
that came in its way. 

One day Llovd ran to his mother in the greatest excitement. 

" My toad is trying to get his skin off ! " he cried. 



WHAT HAPPENED TO LLOYD'S TOAD. 



10 o 
00 



It was true ; and when Lloyd and his mother reached the toad they 
saw him pulling his skin up over his head in much the way that a little 




girl would take off her high-necked, long-sleeved apron, only it was 
harder work for him to do it. But he tugged bravely away with his 
fore feet until he was free, and then what a bright new coat he 
displayed ! 

Lloyd was delighted, and he asked many questions about toads and 
the way in which they changed their coats, and after that he was 
more fond of his toad than ever. 

EMMA C. DOWI). 




THE POP FAMILY. 



There they lay, — I don't know how many of them, — the little 
Pop children. 

They were all in rows, close side by side, quiet as could be. They 
all wore black night-caps. 

Their father was Mr. Pop Korn, and the little ones were Pops too. 

Once they had green curtains to their cob bed, and a silky plume 
for a canopy. 

Now the curtains were braided up with other bed-curtains, several 
families of Pops being together in a great bunch. Perhaps the little 
Pops were tired of this, but they did not complain. 

One day they were taken down by a rosy-cheeked boy. They 
were carried into the kitchen. 




THE POP FAMILY. 



136 



THE POP FAMIL Y. 



What joy ! Now there was to be some play. A dozen children 
were there. They jumped about the floor when the Pops came in. 

Then the boy began to rub and tickle the little Pops with his 
thumb and fingers. How glad they were ! They jumped from their 
bed into a dish. The children laughed, and so the little Pops felt 
cheerful too. 

Most of them did. But some of them did not want to make folks 
happy. These did not jump into the dish. They dropped to the floor. 
They rolled off and hid in corners. Some of them bounced under 
the stove. Lazy folks very often run away from their duty. 

The good Pops were shown into a cosey frying-pan. This was set 
upon the stove. Oh, how warm the fire was ! The little Pops felt 
their hearts swell with the heat. 

Pretty soon one of them cried " Pop " with great glee, and hopped 
into the air. His black night-cap was gone. He had a fresh jacket, 
all snowy white. 

Down he came, pat, upon the floor. Then the other Pops began 
to dance and leap. What a chorus of them ! " Pop, ])op, pop, pop ! " 

The children scampered to pick them up. Each white and sweet 
Pop was kissed by the little ones' red lips. Then all the teeth went 
" munch, munch," and the boys and girls were full of delight. The 
little Pops had made them all happy. 

But the other Pops, who rolled into corners, and under the stove, 
what became of them ? 

They were swept out of doors into the cold. There the hens 
picked them up. The hens said, " Cluck, cluck ! " They were glad 
to swallow the lazy Pops. 

But I would rather pop for the children than to hide under the 
stove. And I would not like to be swallowed by a hen. Would you? 

PENN ANDINCK. 



lj|P» \r ■ . j, .ijVii/i'j'! 1 ,''!'.'.!']!'!!!! 1 ! 11 !!'! 




I WONDER IF BABY EVER THINKS. 



I wonder if baby ever thinks ? 

And what does she think about ? 
Why does she look so very sweet ? 

And why does she sometimes pout ? 



138 / WONDER IF BABY EVER THINKS. 

I wonder what baby ever thinks 
That makes her so full of glee, 

And brings the roses to her face, 
And dimples, one, two, three? 

I wonder how baby ever knows 

The time she should go to sleep, 
And the time to wake and rub her eyes. 

From her slumber soft and deep '.' 

I wonder if baby ever laughs 

At the things on grandmother's nose. 

And if she ever tries to count 
Her ten little rosy toes ? 

I wonder what ever baby says 

In her baby-kind of talk, 
When she coos and stretches out her arms 

For papa to come and walk ? 

I wonder what baby means to be 

When she grows up big and tall ? 
I wonder if she's never afraid 

That nursie will let her fall ? 

I wonder if we were ever " new " 
And tiny, and sleepy and pink? 
But the wonder I wonder the most of all — 
I wonder what babies think ? 

R. W. L. 





in[HiiTTiii""l wb mm M 

'ashington D.C. NIarch is 



lITTLE UNESq n TH£ DW BEF0RE \^ L ENTINE5 Day PeT AND 1 HAD EACH A o 
FIFTY CENT PEICE WE WERE GOING TO BUY VALENTINES WITH THEM. NuR.SE 

TOOK US OUT TO GET THE VALENTINES . On THE WAY WE MET A LITTLE BOY 
AND HIS CL0THE5 WEI\E AU- RAGGED PeT &AID HE LOOKED AS IF HE WANTED 
SOMETHING. go J SAID TO HIM "LlTTLE Boy, WHAT DO YOU WANT?" AND HE 
SAID 1 '} WANT FIFTY CENTS.' \HtN Pet SAVE HIM HER FIFTY CENT' PEICE AND 
THEN J GAVE HIM MINE AND HE WAS SO GLAD THAT HE LAUGHED. WHEN WE 
HAD GIVEN AWAY OUR MONEY WE COULD NOT GET ANY VALENTINES AND SO 

Annie took us home. J wondered what the little boy would 8uy with 

THE TWO FIFTY CENT PEICES . PET THOUGHT HE WOULD GET A NEW PAIR OF 

SHOES AND PERHAPS ONE OF THE CREAM PUFFS WE SAW IN THE BAKERS 

window. Nurse said she hoped he would get a plate of nice hot soup 
and a pair of warm stockings and a worsted 5carf for his neck. 
Pet called the uttle boy the ' wentine Boy'' and we both liked him 

TER THAN THE WENTINES WE Didn't GET. oufK YMtND, 

fRANKJt. 





CAUGHT IN THEIR OWN TRAP. 



It was a very hot day, and rainy too. " Regular dog-day weather," 
old Mr. Spriggins said, " if it is the month of June." 

It was too rainy for the boys to play out-doors at noon-time, so you 
may know it rained hard. The smaller children played " Tea-kettle's 
boiling over ! " in the entry ; but that was too small game for our 
three rogues. 

" How hot it is ! " said Tommy Trow, mopping up his face with a 
very dirty handkerchief. 

" Have to make up a fire to cool off by," said Billy Coe, who was 
always saying queer things. 

" Let's do it," cried Titus Rowe, the harum-scarum boy of the 
school. " Let's make a fire and roast 'em out this afternoon." 

So the three young scamps went to work to get together wood and 
kindlings, and made up a fire in the big, rusty stove. By the time 
one o'clock and Miss True came the school-room was " just as hot as 
a pepper-pot." 



CAUGHT IN THEIR OWN TRAP. 



141 



The scholars, as they came in one after another, looked disgusted, 
and fanned themselves with their books. 

Miss True quietly shut up the stove, and opened all the windows 
and the door. Then, by a very few direct questions, she found out 
who made the fire. 

Moving up a chair each side of the stove, and one behind it, she 




called on Tommy, Billy, and Titus to come with their books, and 
occupy the three chairs. Then she gave all the others seats near the 
open windows, and commenced recitations. 

How those boys did sweat and swelter ! " Please, Miss True, 
mayn't I go to my seat?" asked Tommy, after a while. 



142 THE CREEPMOUSE. 

" No," said Miss True, so decidedly that the others did not dare to 
ask. 

How they did long for recess time, that they might go out in the 
rain and cool off! But when recess came they were kept in instead, 
and very much ashamed they looked. 

" If you are sure you are warm enough now, boys," said Miss True, 
when recess was over, "'you may take your own seats for the rest of 
the day." And very glad they were to do it. 

"I tell you," said Billy, on the way home, "you won't catch me 
making up another fire in a hot day." 

"Nor me," said Titus. " I like to have roasted to death ! " 

"Yes, 'twas awful," sighed Tommy; " but I couldn't help think- 
ing she served us just about right." 

And nobody denied it. 

M. C. W. B. 




THE CREEPMOUSE. 

When baby in the morning 
Begins to coo and crow, 

A little cuddle-y creepmouse 
Keeps moving to and fro. 

And over all the dimples 

Doth the little creepmouse creep, 
Till it finds the very sweetest one, 

And there it goes to sleep. 



ANNA M. PRATT. 




THE CREEPMOUSE. 




When I was a little girl I lived in the country. I had two 
brothers, one younger, one older than I ; but my sister was much 
older, so most of the time I played by myself. 

An old stone wall, gray with moss, divided our farm from the 
street. Beside this wall I had my play-house. In the cracks between 
the stones I put shelves made of bits of wood found at a cabinet- 
maker's near by. On these I set up bits of pretty china or crockery 
that had been broken. Then there were odd little bits of mahogany 
that had been left from sawing out furniture, that looked like little 
chairs. On one of these I sat my doll, and the others stood around 
as though other dolls were expected to visit her. Then a fire was 
laid with twigs in a fire-place made of pebbles, and the flames were 
represented by dandelion blossoms pulled to pieces. In this play- 
house I spent many happy hours, daily adding to its treasures. 

But one morning I found a decoration that I had not made. A big 
black and gold spider, a great beauty, had spun a delicate, wheel- 
shaped web from the wall to a bush near by. He sat in the middle 



GRAND MO TI-IER 'S S TOR Y. 



145 



of it, waiting for a call from some silly fly. I was glad to see him, 
and called him my clock. 

One day I had a small wooden milking pail given me, and it was 
not long before I wanted to use it. We had many cows, and I had 
often watched my father and brother milk, so 1 knew very well how it 
was done. I begged to be allowed to try. So when my father had 
nearly milked a quiet, good, old cow, named " Curly horns," he let me 
sit on the stool and milk my pail full, and no little princess was ever 




happier. But before long I wanted some little pans to turn the milk 
into and set it for cream. Then I would make some butter. Oh, 
what dreams I had of what I'd do! Well, mother bought me the 
pans, and I used to fill and set them on the shelves in the play-house 
each night. In the morning I skimmed the cream, put it in a small 
jar, and at the end of the week beat it with a large spoon in a bowl 
till it was butter. So each week there was a pat of butter for the 
table, which was dealt out with great pride by me to father and 
mother. Do you believe that I ever saw better butter than that ? 



146 



GBANDMO THEB 'S S TOR Y. 



One morning, when I went to skim the milk, the pan was empty. 
Off I went, crying to mother that Dick, my brother, had drank the 
milk. Dick was called, but denied having drank it. So also said 
James. They thought it must have tipped over. " No," said I, " it 
was setting all right on the shelf." So mother comforted me by say- 
ing it would not happen again, though she could not explain. 

But, alas for her credit as a prophet ! it did happen again the next 




*&##&■*' - 



morning, and for many mornings, till I was in despair. One morning 
I rose early and went out to my play-house, jumped over the wall, 
and caught the thief in the act of stealing my milk ; and what do 
you think it was ? 

A black snake ! 

I screamed, and rushed for the house, and Dick ran with a big stick 
and killed him. But that was the end of my play-house, for I was 
afraid of snakes, and feared his mate would come some time ; so I 
never played there again. 

J. D. E. 




HOW THE BABIES RODE. 

When Wynan was six years old lie went to the Adirondacks to 
stay a month. There were papa and mamma and Uncle Jack, Bertha 
and Harry and Grace, Effie and May, besides Wynan himself. Effie 
was only three, and May not yet two, and Wynan, who prided him- 
self on his six years, and felt almost as big as papa, invariably spoke 
of his little sisters as " the babies." 

They left home early in the morning, and after riding all day in 
the cars stopped at a little country hotel, where they stayed all 
night. The next morning they climbed into a big wagon, drawn by 
four horses, and were driven sixteen miles along the rough forest 
road. Wynan was told that at the end of the drive they would be 
met by a guide, who would row them across Lake Wisco. Then they 
would have to walk two miles through the forest to the lodge where 
they were going to stay. 

"But how are the babies going ? " asked Wynan. " They cannot 
walk." 

" They are going to ride," said Uncle Jack. 

" How ? " asked Wynan. " Will there be a baby-carriage for 
them ? " 

Uncle Jack said no, there would not be any carriage ; but when 
Wynan teased to know more he only laughed and told him to wait 
and see. 

Wynan did not want to wait, but he found it was the only way, for 
papa and mamma shook their heads when he begged them to tell him. 

During the last few miles of the drive Wynan guessed many 
strange ways by which the babies would be carried across the 
country, but he never once hit upon the right one. 



148 



HOW THE BABIES RODE. 



And how did they ride ? Why, in two strong pack-baskets that 
were firmly strapped across papa's and Uncle Jack's shoulders. Eifie 




: - 
' ' ■ ■■ _ < 

W , rode 

in Uncle 
Jack's basket, 
and May rode 
with papa. For the 
first and last time 
in his life Wynan really wished 
he was little, that he, too, 
might ride in this odd way. 
' How funny the babies look ! " 
cried Wynan, when they were fairly 
started ; and indeed they did look 
funny, and pretty, too, so mam- 
ma thought. And Effie laughed 
and chipped her hands, 
thinking it fine fun ; but 
May was a little grave at 
first, puzzling her 
small brain to know 
what it all meant. 
After a while she got 
used to the mode of 
travelling, 
and liked 
it as well as her sister. 
And during their stay 
in the great forest many 
a ride did the little e;irls take in this novel fashion. 

EMMA C. DOVVD. 




POLLY'S PUPIL. 



" Well, this is discouraging ! What shall I do 
With such a perverse little lassie as you ? 
You've idled and fretted an hour or more, 
And are not a bit nearer the end than before. 

" You want to be out with the birds and the flowers, 
And cannot be busy for two little hours ? 
Why, flowers are growing, and hear the birds sing — 
There's some kind of duty for every thing. 



150 



POLLY'S PUPIL. 



" Now, bring me your lesson. What ! — D, 0, G, cat ? 
Did ever one hear of such spelling as that ? 
Take that lesson over, and hand me your slate. 
My dear little daughter, twice six is not eight ! 




" And look at your writing ! One really might think 
A chicken had been at your bottle of ink 
And made little claw tracks. Ah, what would you do 
If I were so naughty and careless with you ? 



" Now, play I was Polly, and you shall teach me 
And see what a a;ood little eirl I shall be. 
Yes, you take the primer, and teach me to spell. 
And show me the figures and make me write well." 



POLLY'S PUPIL. 



151 



Miss Polly sat straight as she shut up the book 
And gazed at her pupil with soberest look. 
"My dear little daughter, I'm happy to say 
You've had all your lessons quite perfect to-day, 

" Now leave all the figures and teasing hard words, 
And go out and play with the flowers and birds. 
I am sure so much study is injuring you. — 
Ho ! ho ! Mamma, darling — that's what I should do." 

SYDNEY DAY RE. 




THREE LITTLE MAIDS FROM CANADA. 



MOLLY AND HER KID. 

Ernestine and Helen had started to walk down the lane one morn- 
ing when they heard a cry as if some animal were in distress. 

They looked around, and Ernestine's black eyes spied Molly on the 
other side of the stone wall. 

Molly was the goat, and the children were sure she knew more 
than any other goat' in the world. 

" Perhaps her little Nannie is lost," said Ernestine. " Let's go 
back and get Nellie Bly." 

Nannie was Molly's little kid. 

The children ran back to the house, and Molly bounded along 
behind the wall. 

" Nellie Bly ! Nellie Bly ! " they shouted; "please come out here." 

Nellie Bly was in the garden watering her flowers, but she put 
down her watering-pot and went out into the lane. 

"0 auntie!" said Helen, "something ails Molly; won't you see 
what she wants ?" 

" Do you think she has lost Nannie ? " exclaimed Ernestine. 

" Let's go into the field," answered Nellie Bly, " and see if we can 
understand her." 

She took down the bars, and as soon as they were in the field, 
Molly ran away from them towards some woods at the opposite end 
of the field. She stopped twice to see if they were following, and 
both times made the same little cry of distress. When they reached 
her, there lay Nannie in a crotch formed by two trees gi-owing side by 
side. She had crawled in and could not get out. " Poor Molly ! " 
said Nellie Bly, as she lifted the little kid out of its narrow bed ; 
" she is as frightened about her baby as your mother would be about 
you, Helen, if you fell down stairs." 

" She is trjang to thank you," said Ernestine, as Molly made a low, 
contented sound after assuring herself that the kid was not hurt. 

" You're very welcome, Molly," said Nellie Bly ; " I hope Nannie 
will be a good child." 

One night, several weeks after, Nannie came to the door and 




MOLLY AND HER KID. 



154 



THE STORY OF THE GANDER. 



bleated so piteously that Ernestine said, " Come, Nellie Bly, } 7 ou're 
wanted again." 

She called Helen, and they followed the kid, who kept crying aloud, 
to a stake where Molly had been fastened by a long rope. 

The goat had wound the rope around herself till she was tied up so 
tight she could not move, and was almost choked. 

Nellie Bly untied the rope and said, "You've saved your mother' s- 
life, Nannie." ' 

"Dear little Nannie ! " said Helen and Ernestine. 

ANNA M. PRATT. 





HE STORY OF THE GANDER. 

After Amy is tucked into her 
little bed she is pretty sure to say, 
"'■ Now, auntie, tell me the story of 
the gander." The oftener she hears 
it the better she likes it. Now I 
will tell it to you : — 

Once upon a time a little boy 
and girl were playing together in 
the garden. The little boy was three or four years old, and his sister 
about two. There they sat, close by the garden fence, digging in the 
dirt, and making such lovely mud pies ! 

Waddling up the street came a gander, looking about for some- 



THE STORY OF THE GANDER. 



155 



thing good to eat. At last he saw this sweet little girl in a pink 
frock, close to the fence. She looked very tempting ; so he poked 




his head and neck through the slats of the fence. He took a good, 
firm hold of the pink frock and tried to pull dress and all through. 

Oh, how the dear little girl screamed ! The mite of a boy 
screamed too, and jumped about, but never thought of running 
away. Not he ! he must do something to save his sister. But 
what to do he didn't know, he was so small, and the gander so big. 

At last he caught up a stick, climbed up on the gate, and beat the 



156 



THE STORY OF THE GANDER. 



bird with all his little strength. But the gander did not mind that, 
and pulled away harder than ever, and the little girl screamed louder 
than ever. 

Mamma and the good girl in the kitchen had by this time heard 
the noise, and came running out. Mamma soon made the gander let 




go his hold of that pretty frock. The little girl was comforted and 
pitied, and her brother praised for what he had done. 

He deserved praise, for he was a brave boy ; don't you think so ? 
The gander seemed to him a terrible wild beast, trying to carry off 
his baby sister. 

Here little Amy always says, " And it is true, isn't it, auntie ? " 
and I reply, " Every word true." 

E. M. A. 



/Vov/ 

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l^ej^rpwif/cf 
Jicreejy blowj, 

I5sae/x\pes- 




,071 Id. 

Jd§,rcely 
Keeper 
plate, 
MwJ7ilet)?a.t 

blow/f 

hfi^bdlowS 

"er 

ft.C_e. 

J..I5.G. 




There was a little girl in our neighborhood who fell and injured 
her spine. The doctor said if she could go to the hospital for some 
months she might be cured ; otherwise she would be a cripple the rest 
of her life. 

Her parents were very poor, and could not think of sending her. 
Some of the neighbors, feeling sorry for the little one, started a sub- 
scription paper to raise money to assist her. 

Some of us girls were talking about it one day, and we decided 
that we ought to try and see what we could do to help. 

Some months before, several of us had taken part in a little enter- 
tainment, in which we had appeared as a wandering Italian family ; 
and we decided to repeat it for little Maggie's benefit. 

Lulu, the largest, was the father, and in an old suit of her brother's 
she looked quite manly. Bessie, dressed in an old 

blue wrapper, with a shawl \£m^~Z^. over her head and hold- 




HOW WE GIRLS HELPED. 



159 



ing a doll for baby, made a good mother. Dot, in a long jacket and 
dress, taken from the rag-bag, and Pansie, in some more old things, 
looked quite comical. Lulu's brother put the handle of a coffee-mill 




on a box ; this answered for an organ, and an old rag doll was the 
monkey. After dressing in our back yard we started out. 

We stopped in front of every house, and after we had sung, Pansie 
would go around with her little tin cup, for the pennies. Every one 
laughed to see us, and when we told what we were working for they 
would pay us quite well. One lady said she liked our organ better 
than a real one, because it was quiet. 



160 



HOW WE GIRLS HELPED. 




;##« '^' : '-'- WJ%i fm 



Sf : ;| 



Pansie, who was not quite three, cried in front of one house, and 
the lady paid us over again, because she said the baby played her part 
so well. 

One day, a lady who went to see Maggie at the hospital, told 
the doctor about our performance ; he sent word that he would like 
to see it himself. 

He came in his carriage, and when he saw our troupe he laughed 
until he cried. He said we looked just like an immigrant family. 

A. M. 



Impure Blood 

Is the cause of Boils, Carbuncles, 
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and most effective medicine is Ayer's 
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opinion, the best remedial agencies for 
the cure of "11 diseases arising from im- 
purities of the blood are contained iu 
this medicine." — G. C. Brock, Drug- 
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"My wife was for a long time a suf- 
ferer from tumors on the neck. Noth- 
ing did her any good until she tried 
Ayer's Sarsaparilla, two bottles of which 
made a complete cure." — W. S. Martin, 
Burning Springs, W. Va. 

" We have sold Ayer's Sarsaparilla 
here for over thirty years and always 
recommend it when asked to name the 
best blood-purifier." — W. T. McLean, 
Druggist, Augusta, Ohio. 

Ayer's Sarsaparilla, 

PREPARED BY 

Dr. J. C. Ayer & Co., Lowell, Mass. 

Price $1 ; six bottles, $5. Worth $5 a bottle. 



QPENCERIAN 
OTEEL PENS 

ARE THE BEST. 



No. 31. 
Round Point. 




No. 1. 
Expert's Pen. 

Sample Card containing one of each of the above Pens 
Bent for trial, postpaid, on receipt of 6 cts. iu stamps. 

IVISON, BLAKEMAN & CO, 

753 and. 75S Broadway, Ne'w "Vorlc. 




EASTER CARDS BY MAIL. 

EASTER S UN J) AY conies on the first day of April. Easter card packets 
for 18SH now ready, and are unusually fine. Order at twice* 

We will send a complete set of the first six packages for $3.50, and of 
the complete 9 sets for $5.00, aud 50 cents for postage and registering, or any 
one ordering $5.00 worth of the above packets at one time, a $1.00 packet will be 
sent/ree. 
No. 1. — For 50 cents and 4 cents for Postage, X7 JPrartg & Co. 's and 

other fine Easter Cards, together with a double fringed card and a 

HANDSOME BIRTHDAY CARD. 

No. 2. — For 50 cents anil 4 cents for Postage, 10 large and finer Cards 

from the above publishers, with a foldiikj card, also a Card opening in 

form of a Greek Cross, by L. Prang & Co. 
No. 3. — For $1.00 and cents for Postage, a choice selection of 25 

beautiful cards of Phang's and Hildesheimer's including a SOUVENIR 

booklet (retail price, 35 cts.) and a pansy folding calendar, by L. 

Prang & Co. 
No. 4.— For $1.00 and 8 cents for Postage, a selection of lO OF OUR 

largest and finest cards, together with an Easter booklet and an 

EASTERCHERUB CARD CUT OUT IN FORM OF AN ANGEL'S HEAD, WITH WINGS. 

No. 5. — For $1.00 and 10 cents for Postage, 10 double fringed Cards 

(not folded), each in a separate envelope, together with a book-mark 
mounted on silk ribbon, by L. Prang. 

No. 0. — For 25 cents and 2 cents for Postage, 10 Prang's, Tuck's, 
Ward's, and other beautiful cards. 

No. 7.— For $1.00 and 8 cents for Postage, 4 beautiful Folding Cards 
and 4 Souvenir Rooks, with appropriate selections from best authors 
(retail price, 25 and 50 cents each. 

No: 8.— RIRTHPAY PACKET. For 50 cents, 17 Fine Cards of 
Prang's or Tack's. 

No. ii. — SXJNDA* -SCHOOL PACKET. For 50 cents, 20 Cards, of Marcus Ward's, Prang's Cards, assorted. 

STAMPS OR POSTAL NOTES RECEIVED. Pearl Cards, and other Novelties, at 15, 25, 50, 75 cents 
and $1 .00 each, for Birthday or Anniversary, which will be selected with care for different tastes and ages as specified. 

TO TEACHERS ONLY. 50 Marcus Ward's, Prang's, and other beautiful Cards.no two alike, for $1.00 and 
Scents for Postage. Better assortment, $2.00 and 10 cents for Postage. A very choice selection, no two alike, 
$3.00 and 30 cents for Postage and Registering. 

PAPER. These papers are correct sizes and finish for fashionable correspondence and to introduce more extensively our 
already famous brands of fine note papers, Jieacon Hill Eineu (finest paper made); Carter's Standard (variety of latest 
tints); Treasury Pond (toughest paper made), we offer the following desirable boxew: 

For 35 cents and 5 rents Postage, 1 box containing 24 Sheets and 24 Envelopes, of either grade of the above qualities 
desired. 

For $1.00 and 20 cents Postage, 1 box containing 24 Sheets Reacon Hill Einen (part smooth and part Irish Linen fin- 
ish); 24 Sheets Carter's Standard, 2 tints, with envelopes to match; 24 Sheets Treasury Pond commercial note, with 
envelopes to match all. 

For $2.00 anil 40 cents Postage, 1 box containing 48 Sheets Reacon Hill Einen, smooth and antique, new wallet size; 
48 SJieets Carter's Standard, 4 latest tints, and envelopes to match 48 Sheets Treasury Pond, two sizes and envel- 
opes. Sample sheets of paper and envelopes, with prices and number of sheets to a pound, sent on receipt of 15 cents, 
and special prices to those taking orders for these papers with our card packets. 

POT POURRI (Rose Leaves). A preparation of Rose - Pen f Petals combined with the choicest Oriental per- 
fumes, which will remain fragrant for years. Per box, size, 3\ by & postpaid, 50 cents ; in fine Japanese Jars, securely 
packed and filled, price, from $1.00 to $5.00. 

H. H. CARTER & KARRICK, No. 3 Beacon Street, BOSTON. 



ptbipgs young, 

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CorOP thp€/lQTeR=A\0R,Nf 
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D URKEE'S 



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^UNEQUALLED FORfDw 
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WILL KEEP GOOD FOR YEARS 




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SATISFACTION. 



BOSTON BUREAU OF ADVERTISING 




J 

£6 BROMFIELD ST., Boston, Mass. 



Magazine, 

Newspaper and 
Specialty Advertising. 

Advertisements inserted in any 
publication at publishers lowest 
rates. 

Special attention given to the 
preparation and illustration of ad- 
vertisements. 



Exclusive Advertising Agents for 

"Our Little Ones and The Nursery," 



Bound volumes ii pTJ A TTT7D DAY " and oth 

of LnAl ItrvDUAj pubucati 



ther 
ications.^ 



Special Agents for 

SCRIBNER'S MAGAZINE, 

"HOUSEHOLD," "COTTACE HEARTH," 

" BABYHOOD," AND 

"COOD HOUSEKEEPING." 

Correspondence solicited and estimates furnished for any 
desired line of advertising. 

GEORGE A. FOXOROFT, 

Manager. 



Entertaining Books for the Young. 

HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN'S FAIRY TALES. 

The standard authorized edition. A new translation from the original Danish edition, 
complete and unabridged, fully illustrated with engravings made from the original drawings, 
with an appropriate cover designed by L. S. Ipsen. i vol., quarto, cloth, $2.25. 

ZIGZAG JOURNEYS IN INDIA. 

In which the Zigzag Club visits Bombay, Oudeypour, Delhi, Lucknow, Benares, and Cal- 
cutta, with a charming collection of the household Zenana tales of India. Fully illustrated. 
1 vol., small quarto, illuminated board covers and linings, $1.75. 1 vol., small quarto, cloth, 
bevelled and gilt, $2.25. 

THREE VASSAR GIRLS AT HOME. 

A new volume, in which the favorites of so many readers travel through some of our 
own States and Territories, encountering many interesting adventures en route. Illustrated by 
Champ, i vol'., small quarto, illuminated board covers and linings, $1.50. 1 vol., small quarto, 
cloth, bevelled and gilt, $2.00. 

THE KNOCKABOUT CLUB IN THE EVERGLADES. 

By F. A. Ober. A new volume, in which the boys visit Florida for the purpose of explor- 
ing Lake Okechobee, on which trip they encounter various obstacles and adventures with alli- 
gators, etc., fully illustrated. 1 vol., small quarto, illuminated board covers and linings, $1.50. 
1 vol., small quarto, cloth, bevelled and gilt, $2.00. 

CHATTERBOX FOR 1887. 

The Genuine Chatterbox contains a great variety of original stories, sketches and poems 
for the young. Over 200 full-page original illustrations. 1 vol., illuminated board covers, $1.25. 
1 vol., cloth, black and gold stamps, $1.75. 1 vol., cloth, extra, chromo, gilt side and edges, $2.25. 

For fuller List address the Publishers. 

ESTES & LAURIAT, BOSTON, MASS. 



PREPARED 

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any other liquid glue. 
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THE STANDARD FOR THIRTY YEARS. 

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Sold Everywhere. 



BROWN'S FRENCH DRESSING. 

The Original. Beware of Imitations. 
PARIS MEDAL ON EVERY BOTTLE 




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HIGHEST AWARD, NEW ORLEANS EXPOSITION 

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carnrick's SOLUBLE FOOD 



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THE OINGEE & CONARD CO'S 
LEADING SPECIALTIES. 

ROSES 

ALL VARIETIES, SIZES AND PRICES 
FINE EVER-BLOOMING PERPETUAL, 

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GIVEN AWAY! A package Mixed Flower 

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nnnrn If JO" love RARE FLOWERS, Choicest only, 
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5 Packs Best Annual |#\*-v Pansies, 

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GJTI Plants for $1.00. Sendfol |J|J1||U|I4 
Send names of all Plant buyers. 



CARDS 



Book of HIDDEN NAME Cards, 



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13 Funny Stories, 

Speeches, Etc.. finrl acopy of our finely illustrated 
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32 COLUMN ILLUSTRATED PAPER. 

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" Alphabet of Success, 535 Conundrums, etc., bis lot c( 
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GOOD NEWS 
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* P. O. Box 289. 31 and 33 Vesey St., New York. 





THIS useful and beautiful Paper, Magazine and 
letter opener will be went on receipt of 3 two- 
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Sample letter: — ''I am much pleased with your 
paper cutter just arrived. Enclosed you will find one 
dollar, kindly send me paper cutters for amount. I 
wish to present them to my friends." Address 

Soribner's Magazine, 743 Broadway, New York. 



in 



QQfi Funny Selections, Scrap Pictures, and nice sample i _ i«ow 
Oull Cards for ac. Hill Pub. Co., Cadiz, Ohio. BOX lOBl, 



102 Pages; 94 Colored Maps; 60 Colored Diagrams. Contains 
complete Map of every State, Territory, and Country in 
the world, and statistical tables, etc. Flexible covers, gold 
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paid, to any address for 35 cts. 5 copies for $1. Postage 
stamps taken. 

E. B. GOODNOW & CO., 

BOSTON. MASS. 



■fOU-WE/GA/r" 
PURE 




Its superior excellence proven in millions of homes for 
more than a quarter of a century. It is used by the United 
States Government. Endorsed by the beads of the Great 
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I>r. Price's the only Baking Powder that does not contain 
Ammonia, Lime, or Alum. Sold only in Cans. 

PRICE BAKING POWDER CO., 

NEW YORK. CHICAGO. ST. LOUIS. 




GOLD MEDAL, PARIS, 1878. 

BAKER'S 



Warranted absolutely pure 
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Sold by Grocers eve rywhere. 

W. BAKER I CO., Dorchester, Mass. 




(EUREKA SILK CO., Boston, Mass. 



CINDY 



Send SI, $2, $3, or $5 for a retail 
box by express of the best candies 
America, put up elegantly, and 
strictly pure. Suitable for presents. 
Refers to all Chicago. Address 
GUNTHEK, Confectioner, 78 Madfsoii St., Chicago. 



(•^.Paines 
£ls r y 

For The Nervous 
The Debilitated 
^^( The Aged 

J ORES Nervous Prostration, Nervous Head- 
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JOSEPH G! LIQITS 

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119 Milk St., Boston, IV] ass., U.S.A. 



FRENCH. --GERMAN. 
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PEARS' SOAP has received 15 International Awards:— Sale Universal. 



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Many persons are under the impression that Ivory Soap is ex- 
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they ARE NOT, but like all counterfeits, lack the peculiar and remarkable qualities 
of the genuine, Ask for "Ivory" Soap and insist upon getting it. 

Copyright, 1886, by Procter & Gamble, 




Copyright, 1888, by Russell Publishing Company.] [Entered at the P. O. at Boston as second-class matter. 







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CONTENTS. 



OUR BRIGAND Emma C. Dowd K 

(Illustrated by J. Steeple Davis.) 

A TURTLE SHIP Kham 164 

(Illustrated by H. M. Beal.) 

APRIL L. B. C 167 



(Illustrated by Lizbeth B. Comins.) 

THE FIRST SNOW-STORM 

(Illustrated by Louis Meynelle.) 

FLOWERS THAT LOVE THE SUN . . 

(Illustrated by H. P. Barnes.) 

ON THE RACE-COURSE '. . . 

(Illustrated by F. T. Merrill.) 

PLAYING NOAH'S ARK 

(Illustrated by H. Winthrop Pierce.) 

MISTRESS KITTY 

(Illustrated by Julia Robinson.) 

A NEW USE FOR CLOTHES-PINS . . 

(Illustrated by Edith F. Foster.) 

FRANKIE'S LETTER 

(Illustrated by Jessie McDermott.) 

TOBOGANNING 

(Illustrated by J. H. Hatfield.) 

A NEW CURE 

(Illustrated by Maud Humphrey.) 

PROMPT PAYMENT 

(Illustrated by Maud Humphrey.) 

THE SHIPWRECK OF NOVEMBER . . 

(Illustrated by H. M. Beal.) 

THE FUNNY MAN FROM FUNNY-LAND 

(Illustrated by F. T. Merrill.) 

NIGHT-FLOWERS 

(Illustrated by H. P. Barnes.) 



Mrs. Annie D. Bell .... 168 

Mrs. G. Hall 170 

Francis Coe 171 

Uncle Felix 174 

Emma C. Dowd 177 

Mrs. M. N. Sanford .... 17S 

Frankie 1S0 

Lura Bell , 1S1 

Mrs. Frances Smith . . . . 1S4 

Catharine S. Holmes . . . 1S7 

G. E. W 1S8 

Marion Manville .... 190 

Mrs. G. Hall ........ 19: 



The Illustrative Department under the direction of Mr. George T. Andrew. 



OUR LITTLE ONES AND THE NURSERY, 



One Year .... 
Sixteen Months . 



(MONTHLY.) 
TERMS (in advance). 
. $1.50. Eight Months 

2.00. Single Copies 



$1.00 



15 cents. 



Two Copies, one year 
Three Copies, " 



CLUB 

$2.80. 
4.00. 



RATES. 

Four Copies, one year 
Five Copies, " 



. $5.00. 
6.00. 

Subscriptions: — Change of post-office address can be made by giving the old as well as the 
new address, but not without this information. Notice should be received the first of the preceding 
month. 

Remittances are at risk of the publishers onlv when sent by Postal Order, American Express 
Order, Check, or Registered Letter. Checks, Drafts, and Orders should be made payable to the 

RUSSELL PUBLISHING COMPANY, BOSTON, MASS 



lACKER'S 



A " TAR SOAP 



Healing 



FOR TOILET, NURSERY, fc SKIN DISEASES 
A bsolutely Pure and Non- Irritating. 



UNQUESTIONABLY THE BEST for washing Infanta. 
EMOLLIENT and grateful to the sensations. Makes the 

skin smooth, soft, clastic and healthful. 
PREVENTS Chapping, Chafing, Irritations, etc. 
CURES Dandruff, Itching and Skin Diseases, 
ANTISEPTIC— Removes offensive odors and morbid 

secretions from the body. -5c, Druggists. 

Sample, post-paid, 4c. Send for Pamphlet. 

THE PACKER M'F'G CO., 
& 100 Fulton St., New York* 






C^Rina 

\gm|3ound 

For The Nervous 
The Debilitated 
The Aged 




| DRES Nervous Prostration, NervousHead- 
■ ache, Neuralgia, NervousWeakness, 
^Stomach and Liver Diseases, and all 
affections of the Kidneys. 
AS A NERVE TONIC, It Strengthens 
and Quiets the Nerves. 

AS AN ALTERATIVE, It Purines and 

Enriches the Blood. 

AS A LAXATIVE, It acts mildly, but 
surely, on the Bowels. 

AS A DIURETIC, It Regulates the Kid- 
neys and Cures their Diseases. 
Recommended by pro Cession al and business men. 
Price $x.OO. Sold by druggists. Send for circulars. 

WELLS, RICHARDSON & CO., Proprietors. 

BURLINGTON. VT. 



BOSTON BUREAU OF ADVERTISING, 

36 BROMFIELD ST., Boston, Mass. 




Its superior excellence proven in millions of homes for 
more than a quarter of a century. It is used by the United 
States Government. Endorsed by the heads of the Great 
Universities as the Strongest, Purest, and most Healthful. 
Dr. Price's the only Baking Powder thafdoes not contain 
Ammonia, Lime, or Aluiu. Sold only in Cans. 

PRICE BAKING POWDER CO., 

NEW YORK. CHICAGO. ST. LOUIS. 




Magazine, 

Newspaper and 
Specialty Advertising. 

Advertisements inserted in any 
publication at publishers lowest 
rates. 

Special attention given to the 
preparation and illustration of ad- 
vertisements. 



Exclusive Advertising Agents for 

"Our Little Ones and The Nursery," 



Bound 



o7 Iumes " CHATTERBOX," 



and other 
publications. 



Special Agents for 

SCRIBNER'S MAGAZINE, 

"HOUSEHOLD," "COTTAGE [HEARTH," 

" BABYHOOD," AND 

"COOD HOUSEKEEPING." 

Correspondence solicited and estimates furnished for any 
desired line of advertising. 

GEORGE A. FOXOROPT, 

Manager. 



DURKEE'S 



GAUNTLET BRAND 




*££«<" SPICES 
* MUSTARD. 

SOLD ONLY IN FULL WEIGHT SEALED PACKAGES. 

Guaranteed absolutely pure, and warranted to excel 
all others in strength, richness, flavor and cleanliness. 



DURKEE'S 



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UNEQUALLED FDR 
EXGE1.LENCE 

Without a rival as a dressing for all Salads, and as a 
sauce for Cold Meats, etc. It is prepared with extreme 
care ; all its ingredients are of the purest and beat; 
and will keep good for years. 

BEWARE OF ALL. IMITATIONS 




Scribner s * 
^ Magazine 



FOR 1585. 



Among the important articles to appear during the year are the folJowino- : 

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENS01l^^^s^^?^5 n, ^ d '^*ey«. He 

1 Wllte °t many topics, old and new, and in a familiar and 
personal way which will form new bonds of friendship between the author and his thousands of readers. 

RAILWAY ACCIDENTS, TT yyV - S ; ^A^AIN of the Lawrence Scientific School of Harvard 
,! . rivuii/ui^ iu, University, will be the subject of the first of a group of SDeciallv imnnr 

taut and richly illustrated articles upon railways— their construction, administration, etc.- the authors and sp » £ 
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I I't 'v ^.l 1 f| 

ill 1 ' 1 . fono log? day 

|*f i i iiJ;Ajpi\crim3©7 jajl;; 




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Vol. VIII. 



1SS8 

Copyright, 1888, by Ruesell Publishing Company. 



No. 6. 



OUR BRIGAND. 

Oh, he is a terrible brigand 

All through the long, long day, 
With his crimson sash and his fierce moustache. 

And his hat with its feather gay. 

Yes, he is a terrible brigand, 

As he hides in parlor or hall, 
And rushes out with triumphant shout, 

To capture Nannie or Paul. 

But he is a dear little brigand 

When the sun sinks low in the west, 
And with sleep in his eyes he drops disguise, 

Begging to be undressed. 

Yes, he is a dear little brigand 

When his childish prattlings cease, 
And he holds my hand till he's safe in the land 

Where brigands are all at peace. 

EMMA C. DOWD. 




When you go to California by sea you sail 
on the Pacific Ocean. A great many turtles 
live there, in that ocean. 

Perhaps you have seen turtles in the country. They are small, 
and could swim in a pudding-dish. But the ocean turtles are very 
large. One of them could carry three or four children upon his 
back. 

One day Uncle Will was standing upon a steamer's deck watching 
the turtles. The ship had just run over one. You ought to have 
seen him. 




A TURTLE SHIP. 



165 



He was asleep, you know, when the ship hit him. He waked up 
very suddenly, you may be sure. He acted as frightened as if he 
had been a bad boy caught stealing cookies. He tumbled over and 




over, and flapped his flippers very funnily. He looked as if it would 
be a relief to him to be boiled in a soup. While Uncle Will was 
laughing at him he saw another comic sight. A little way off was 
another turtle, sound asleep. 



166 



A TURTLE SHIP. 



On the turtle's back stood a crane upon one leg. He was as still 
as if he were asleep too. He was captain, and cook, and crew of his 
living ship. He looked very happy. Now, if you could stand on 
one leg and go to sea on a turtle, would it not be nice ? 




You see, if you got shipwrecked on Robinson Crusoe's island, you 
coidd eat your ship. 

Only if your ship dived beneath the water, and you could not fly 
like a crane, what would become of 3 r ou ? 

I guess I would rather play going to sea in the rocking-chair. 
Wouldn't you ? 

KHAM. 




\iuk9\pRiis. 
<&ugbt in tpe 

Will ^ ) 00 ^(5 l / A\( 





oft i^^A w 

•Whiles 

w tk'ir 



jjl&tlhlb. (V\IN§ 




THE FIRST SNOW-STORM. 



Away off on a warm sunny island, little Harry Hall was born. 
Flowers bloomed all the year round. The sun shone most of 
the time, although now and then there were thunder-showers. 

Many wonderful plants grew wild, while on the shore shells 
and seaweed and queer little fishes were often to be found. 

When Harry was six years old his parents took a journey to 
New York. 

It seemed very odd to the little boy to live in a place where 
there were so many people, and such great houses. After a while 
the weather grew cold, and he had to wear thick woollen clothing. 
The house in which they lived was heated by a furnace ; but one 
day they had a fire of logs on the hearth. Harry enjoyed it very 
much, and thought the bright blaze so pretty. 

The sky was gray and cloudy one afternoon, and Harry had 
been standing by the window watching the street cars. Suddenly 
the air grew thick, and he could scarcely see the houses opposite. 
Something white and feathery fell slowly down and rested on 
the window ledge. Then it disappeared. But more and more of 
the little flakes came, until there was quite a ridge outside of the 
window. 

Harry opened the sash gently, fearing it might fly away. He 
was surprised when he touched it to find it so cold. He took 



THE FIRST SNOW-STORM. 



169 



some up in his hand, but in a moment it was only a drop of 
water. 

By that time the street and the men's hats and coats were 
quite white. Harry was puzzled to find a name for the beautiful 
white substance, so he ran to his mamma and asked her about it. 

She told him it was snow, and because the air was so warm 
on the beautiful island where he was born they never had any. 

The next morning he saw the little children of the neighbor- 




hood playing in it; but before noon the sun was so bright and 
warm the snow had all melted away. 

When the second snow-storm came Harry's papa brought home 
a beautiful sleigh, and gave his little boy great pleasure by draw- 
ing him up and down the street. 

Harry soon learned to go out by himself, and made many 
friends ; especially of the little girls, as he was very generous with 
his sleigh. 

But he has never forgotten his surprise when he saw the first 
snow-storm. 

MRS. ANNIE D. BELL. 




FLOWERS THAT LOVE 

THE SUN. 




M 




There are some flowers that 

love the sunlight as much as you 

do. See the sunflower, with its 

great, honest face, always looking 

towards the west until it has 

gone out of sight. The next 

morning you will find that same 

flower gazing towards the east, all ready and waiting 

for it to rise. This is why this flower has often been called the 

" Sun Worshipper." 

The little white daisy is a great lover of the open light of day. 
This is why it used to be called " day's eye." And the marigold 
mourns its going so much that it solemnly closes just at night- 
fall. 

So does the oxalis, and you will not only find its flowers closed, 
but the leaves, too, folded all up into three pretty divisions, like a 
heart. And our sweet pond-lily always hides away under the water 
when the sun is gone, only to appear when it comes up in the 
morning. 

MRS. G. HALL. 



ON THE RACE-COURSE. 

I once owned shares in railway stock, 
And had a " free pass " yearly ; 

And how, or when, that road failed up 
I never knew quite clearly. 




The first I knew — the engineer 
Wore pants, instead of dresses; 

And from beneath the school-boy's cap 
I missed the golden tresses. 



172 



ON THE RACE-COURSE. 

And next this kilted Jockey came 
His steed — a (rocking?) pacer. 

My " four-year-old," in papa's boots, 
Astride a " Maud S." racer. 




The trotting course — I must confess it 
Is laid across my " body Brussels ; " 

And here the nag and Jockey come 
To train, and stretch their muscles. 



The arm-chair's next a tally ho ! 

And " Kitty " is postilion. 
The coachman blows his penny horn 

As if he owned a million. 



ON THE RACE-COURSE. 



173 



A stylish turnout next appears, 
Selected quite at random ; 

The saw-horse, boot-box, organ stool, 
All driven " a-la-tandem." 

Now Jockey's cap and pony's tail 
Go switching round the table ; 

Hurrah ! they're on the home 
stretch now, 
As fast as they are able. 




God's blessing on you, bonny boy ! 

Your race is just beginning, 
And may you gain in future years 

A race that's worth the winning. 

FRANCIS COE. 



PLAYING NOAHS ARK. 

They were going to play Noah's Ark. This was a quiet game, and 
mamma had a headache. 

Uncle Jed was Noah. Zuriel played Ham. She was six years 
old, and she was fond of ham and eggs. 

Doll Kitty Dingle was Shem. She had lost one eye by falling 
against the stove. Zuriel said this " was a shame." And " Shem " 
sounded something like " shame." you know. 

Baby Grace was Japhet. She was two years old.- Her hair was 
cut straight across her forehead. She talked all the time, but could 
not speak plain. The nurse said it was Hebrew. Japhet was a 
Hebrew. 

Peter and Billy played animals. Billy was a small pug dog. He 
was the elephant. Peter was so large a cat that he played all the 
rest of the animals, and the birds too. 

They all went into the ark, then the flood began. It did not truly 
rain, for the ark was the arm-chair in the parlor ; but Uncle Jed 
said, " Br-r-r-r ! " and " Pit-a-pat, pit-a-pat ! " That was the wind 
and the rain, you see. 

The arm-chair was on wheels. To make the ark sail, Uncle Jed 
turned the wheels with his hands. 

Ham sat on Noah's knee, and held Shem in his lap. Japhet 
perched on the other knee. 

Billy, the elephant, climbed upon one of Uncle Jed's shoulders. 
The rest of the animals and birds sat on the other shoulder. They 
were puss Peter, you know. 

Then the ark set sail, and rolled about the parlor in a lovely 
manner. 

After a few moments Zuriel thought it was time to send out the 
dove. She was in a hurry, because she smelled gingerbread baking 
in the kitchen. 







PLAYING NOAH'S ARK. 



176 



PLAYING NOAH'S ARK. 



So they played send out the dove ; but he really was out all the 
time. It was a stuffed dove, and he sat upon a brass moon which 
hung from the gas-pipe. 

Zuriel said she did not want to land in the moon. Poor Noah did 
not know what to do about it. 

Perhaps the elephant smelled the gingerbread too. At any rate, 
just then Billy tumbled out of the ark. 

But he was not drowned. He found the parlor carpet dry, and 
raced away to the lounge. 

Noah said the lounge must be Mount Ararat, and they would go 
ashore. 

Billy's ear caught the sound of " rat," and he barked very loud 
indeed. 

Then Peter forgot that he was any animal but a cat, and he hopped 
out of the ark. 

Ham and Japhet scampered off, and went straight to the kitchen. 

Soon they came back with their mouths full of gingerbread. The} T 
found poor lonely Noah asleep in the ark. 

UNCLE FELIX. 





iLsTns 



j77v, CLCLinlJ Ci.nct pre/Tv ? 



J^/jl* do&-£ youi? fournily otqw? 

}/pjk TfcirTtL^r) dpljje^ r ^vYQ Talfclnd poll fez 



'J pussy-cats all m a r w; 




"Girls, what do you think these are good for?" asked Nannie 
Brown of her two little Brown sisters. She held up one of the 
clothes-pins they were picking up from the grass, where Norah had 
left them after taking in the wash. 

" What do we think they are good for ? Why, to fasten the clothes 
to the line, of course," answered the other two little Browns in a 
breath ; " every one knows that." 




&Ju& fefe " 



A NEW USE FOR CLOTHES-PINS. 



179 



"But there's another use for them," said Nannie; "Norah told 
me last night. She says if we put them on our noses — so " — and 
she put one astride her nose as she spoke, — "they will make our 
noses of the most beautiful shape, not at all puggy and turned 
up as they are now, you know. Wouldn't it be splendid to try 
it?" 

Now the three little Browns had noses that were most decidedly 
turned up, and many were the times they had each sighed in 
secret over the fact. Here was their chance to shape their noses 
■" illigantly," as Norah told them, 




"oa/sS 3 ""™™"'" 



,-,-""' 



That night three clothes-pins were missing from the basket. The 
three little girls, after being tucked in by mamma for the night, 
-each slyly drew one from under her pillow and put it on her 
nose. It took them some time to go to sleep in such a queer fix, 
but they did at last. When mamma came to take a last look at 
them before going to bed she found them sound asleep, each with 
a little red nose pinched by a clothes-pin. Although astonished at 
the sight, she laughed until the tears ran down her cheeks. 

As she took off the pins and put them back in the basket she 



said, "What won't these children do next!" 



MRS. M. N. SANFORD. 




ASHiNGTON 



Wj\ 



PRIL I88S 



JDear Uittle Ones , -p 

i here is a big park in front of our, house, and when the 
leaves are off the trees we can see the president's house on the other 
side of it. The President's house is big and white, and there are trees all 
round it. /v\y prpa took me to see the president not long ago. 
There were lots of rooms in his house and J liked it becruse you could 

SEE THE GREAT RIVEP, FP>OM THE WINDOWS, AND ALL THE BOOTS GOING UP 
AND DOWN. V/h en ^ e went IN THE ROOM WHERE THE PRESIDENT WAS T 
WENT UP TO HiM AND SHOOK HANDS WITH HIM AND SAID, "QoOD MORNING, 

JAp.. President", the way r\-< papa told me to. His wife was there too 
so J said to her , Good morning , JAps. President ," and then they 
all laughed. /^rs. "President looked pretty and she kissed me and 
looked out of the window with me at the rivefk , and she gave me 
some splendid kind of candy and j liked her very much. "when 
it was time to go v/e went through a great glass house full of 

FLOWERS , AND A MAN CUT ME SOME ROSES AND ,/^RS. President Knelt down! 
AND PINNED THEM IN MY COAT. fjEXT TiME \ WRITE J WILL TELL YOU 
ABOUT OUR BIG "WASHINGTON JApNVHENT AND THE LITTLE CHINESE BOY 
pET AND J KNOW. VoUPv LITTLE FRIEND, 

Rg J HAVE A NEW SAILOR SUIT cJraNKIE.. 

WITH U3NG. PANTS. 



182 



TOBOGGANING. 



Bonfires are glowing in crimson splendor, 
Rockets are flashing across the sky, 

Onward for aye, like a rocket speeding, 
Over the icy path we fly. 




W0;6 '" i ' ■■■■''■ '■■■'-'■' {l.jJ!f'mn' L n 



TOBOGGANING. 



183 



Oh, we are swept to a land enchanted, 

Colored with light from a realm of dreams ; 




'0^!$**! 




Firelight and torchlight, and wondrous starlight, 
Crinkled with frost, through the cold night gleam. 



184 



A NEW CURE. 



What is the earth but a big toboggan, 
On the tremendous slide of space 

Swinging at ease 'mid the rival planets, 
Speeding along in an endless race? 



Comets and meteors glare like rockets 
Over the wonderful world-bearing slide ; 

Youthful or olden, gray-haired or golden, 
Fearful or bold, we must all take our ride. 



LURA BELL. 




A NEW CURE. 

Carrie had a very bad habit of crying. Not a bright, quick flood 
of tears, such as leave baby faces shiny and sunny as wood anemones 
after an April shower. It was a long, howling, November storm — 
wailing and whining about the house till we were all unhappy and 
indignant by turns. 

Expostulation was in vain until grandma came for a visit and 
tried the New Cure. Now Carrie loved grandma dearly, but stood 
somewhat in awe of her. She had been known to withdraw prom- 
ises of rides or stories,' and to recapture sweetmeats when children 
had been very bad indeed. So it was two whole days before Carrie 
had a cry in grandma's hearing. When she did have one, however, 
poor grandma could hear nothing else. 

"Carrie," said she, "if you don't stop I shall pull all the hair off 
my head." Carrie looked amazed, but was not seriously alarmed, 
and kept on howling. " Carrie," said grandma again, " I shall surely 



A NEW CURE. 



185 




'j'i|i. 



tear my hair all out by the roots if you don't stop that distressing 
noise. You know they tore their hair in Bible days when anything 
very dreadful happened that they could neither help nor get rid of." 

Carrie was crying to go out in the rain. She gave a little longer, 
louder h-o-w-1, and took a peep from under her hat-brim to see what 
grandma would do. 

The old lady looked desperate. In an instant she raised her hand 



186 



A NEW CUBE. 



— thin and feeble from a long attack of fever — to her pretty lace 
cap. In another instant she sat straight in her chair with a head as 
bald and shiny as the baby's ! 

You should have seen Carrie's face ! " Grandma ! Grandma ! " 
she screamed. " Sew on your hair ! I'll never cry so any mo-o-o-re if 
you only will ! " 




Grandma made sure that the promise was a serious one. Then 
she carefully readjusted her wig and cap. The wig remained a mys- 
tery to Carrie ; but after that grandma had only to raise her hand 
to her head to check the loudest cry. Carrie never forgot her fright 
and her promise. 

MRS. FRANCES SMITH. 



m 




PROMPT PAYMENT. 

While the dressmaker sewed, little Carrie kept watch 
With the sharp eyes which childhood possesses, 

And her dolls, black and white, soon were wearing new suits, 
Made from bits of her Aunt Kitty's dresses. 



Then I said, " My dear Carrie, Aunt Kitty will charge, 

If so many big pieces she misses." 
With a sweet upward look little Carrie said, " Well, 

Will it do if I pay you in kisses ?" 

CATHARINE S. HOLMES. 



\ 



MM , mh 











hs^il / HEN Fred's papa came home from Boston 
he brought his little boy a fine toy yacht, 
that he named " November," because that 
was the name of the month when it came 
to him. He took much pleasure sailing it 
on the river that flowed just back of his 

papa's store. Directly below this smooth water were the falls. 

One day the string by which Fred held his boat became fastened 





between the rocks, and in try- 
ing to free it the boat capsized. 
Then the string broke. This 



THE SHIPWRECK OF NOVEMBER. 



189 



relieved the boat, and she speedily righted, g 




ave herself a little shake, 
set her sails to 
the wind, and 
started swiftly 
toward the 
falls. 

Just at the 
eda;e of the dam 
she stopped for 
a second and 
then sailed 
proudly on, to 
be whirled and 
tossed over the 
cruel rocks to 
the still water 
below. Oh, 
what an anx- 
ious time that 
Fred ran 



as fast as his feet could fly over 
the bridge, down to the edge of 
the river, hoping to see some bit 
of his boat go by. To his 
great joy there lay that 
precious boat on the sand, 
thoroughly soaked but 
uninjured, except by well- 
scratched sides, and a 
small bit of wood broken 

from the stern. 

g. e. w. 




/ 






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T\ottV F VN H i J^M © - 



vi "$ '<%kml k The funniest man from funny-land. 

* -^ sT? v 4i ».( J» With funny legs which never stand. 

y •■' j ^.?«~-a And funny thumbs and funny toes, 

"*~\.../ And blinking eyes, and turn-up nose, 

And speech you never understand ; 

funny man from funny-land ! 

The funniest speech you ever heard. 
He talks, but never says a word ; 
And looks as wise as if he knew 
More than he tells of " Goo, ah Goo," — 

As if he thought we'd understand 

The funny talk of funny-land. 



THE FUNNY MAN FROM FUNNY-LAND. 

And if you ask him where he's from, 
Or what's his native state or home, 
He always says, just "Goo, ah Goo." 
I've never heard of it, have you ? 
It would be fun to find it and 
The funny things in funny-land. 

And when you ask him what's his name, 
"Goo, ah Goo," — 'tis just the same. 
I think he came from China here, 
He talks so very odd and queer. 

But what he means I never can 
Make up my mind, that funny man. 



191 



funny man from funny-land, 
Whom no one here can understand, 

1 think we'll have to send you to 
Your native place of " Goo, ah Goo ; " 

For there they must all understand, 
Those funny folks of funny-land. 

MARION MANVILLE. 






NIGHT FLOWERS 



There are some flowers that never see the 
sun. One of the most curious is the ''even- 
ing primrose." About six o'clock it suddenly 
bursts open, with a popping sound, and at six 
next morning closes. 

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you can hear this strange performance. 

This is why it does so. The little calyx holds the petals in such 

a way that the moment it turns back they are let loose. At 

once it bursts out into full flower, with this runny noise, like a 

pop-gun. 

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think of never s«nlir sun at all! 

In a far EastjB ^ntry there is a kind of jasmine called the 
"sorrowful tvee¥^§ ] Broops as if sick in the daytime, and a1 
night grows fresh arSWright. It opens its lovely flowers with a 
very pleasant odor till •norning, and then wilts and looks wretched 



MRS. G. HALL. 




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Ayer's Sarsaparilla, 

PREPARED BY 

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Price $1; sis bottles, $5. Worth $5 a bottle. 



The Flynt Waist or True Corset. 




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The first cut represents a high-necked garment. The second, a low- 
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i?i tlte back, thereby insuring in every waist the most successful 

SHOULDER-CRACE EVER CONSTRUCTED. 

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This preparation is far superior to all other preparations of Cod-Liver 
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the genuine. Manufactured only by DR. ALEXR. B. WILBOIS, 
Chemist, Boston, Mnss. Send for illustrated circular, which will be 
mailed free, gsr-Sold by all druggists. ^J3 



4- 




"T IKE as 

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destroy your i 

says, ' ' The Ivoj^Soap is of remarkable purity as a laundry 

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A WORD OF WARNING. 

There are many white soaps, each represented to be "just as good as the ' Ivory' ; " 
they ARE NOT, but like all counterfeits, lack the peculiar and remarkable qualities of 
*he genuine. Ask for "Ivory" Soap and insist upon getting it. 
Copyright 1S36, by Procter & Gamble. 



*)• 



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Thos. Nelson and Sons, London. 



Copyright, 188S, by Russeli. Publishing Compaht.1 [Entered at tbe P O. at Boston as second-class matter. 



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CONTENTS. 



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LITTLE MAY'S JEWELS .'.... George S. Burleigh . . 

(Illustrated by Miss E. S. Tucker.) 

JESSIE AND THE GOAT Mrs. C. O. Harrington . . 196 

(Illustrated by Carl Hirschberg.) 

PRETTY POLLY . s - Fanny Gerry Wilder . 200 

(Illustrated by Miss V. D. Prentiss.) 

THE BIRD'S BABY-SHOW • George Cooper ' - 202 

(Illustrated by Irene E. Jerome.) 

HOW NOAH'S ARK WENT TO SCHOOL . . J. K. Ludlum 204 

(Illustrated by H. P. Barnes.) 

SUE'S DANDELION-GREENS ' . ■ Mary A. Sawyer 206 

(Illustrated by J. H. Snow.) 

TEDDY AND JOE > • • Agnes G. Gray 2oy 

(Illustrated by F. T. Merrill.) 

FLOWERS THAT HIDE FROM THE SUN . Mrs. G. Hall ....... 210 

(Illustrated by Louis Meynelle.) 

FRANKIE'S LETTER Frankie 211 

(Illustrated by Jessie McDermott.) 

HOW TOM TOOK CARE OF DOT Katie Kyle 

(Illustrated by L. D. Norton.) 

HAWKS AND HOLLYHOCKS Lavinia S. Goodwin ... 

(Illustrated by Edith Foster.) 

MAY • L. B. C 

• (Illustrated by Lizbeth B. Comins.) 

FRED'S STOLEN RIDE Florence B. Hallowell 

(Illustrated by J. H. Hatfield.) 

A SMALL PHILOSOPHER Lucy Willing 

(Illustrated by Maud Humphrey.) 

A RACE AND WHO WON IT Louise R. Baker .... 

(Illustrated by H. M. Beal.) 



The Illustrative Department under the direction of Mr. George T. Andrew. 



OUR LITTLE ONES AND THE NURSERY, 



One Year . . . 
Sixteen Months 



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Subscriptions: -Change of post-office address can be made by giving the o1 ^ ^ a ^ 
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^Remittances are at risk of the publishers only when sent by Postal Order American Express 
Order, Seek, or Registered Letter. Checks, Drafts, and Orders should be made payable to the 

RUSSELL PUBLISHING COMPANY, BOSTON, MASS 

FINE COMPLEXION, SMOOTH, SOFT SKIN. 

Mention On I» OffH, and send four cents for sample gffi^'Jgg*^&Jffi^ 
night with warm water and rough wash-oloth, and you wul be BnWMg ™™ |°"<rj is absolutely pure blari 

anottto«^^^^ 

&lf;et^^^ *■ Druggists -° 

THE PACKER MaPGr. CO., IOO Fulton Street, New York. 




LITTLE MAY'S JEWELS. 




158B 

Copyright, 1888, by Russell Publishing Company. 



No. 7. 



LITTLE MAY'S JEWELS. 

What are you weaving, my wee Miss May ? 

Oh, a beautiful chain to wear 

About my neck, or over my hair, 
From stems of the dandelion gay. 
How long will it last ? It will last to-day, 
To-morrow I'll play some other play. 

And what are you doing now, Miss May ? 
Making a fillet of lilac flowers, 
Pretty and sweet, between the showers 

That drive the buzzing bees away. 

Will it last you long ? It will last to-day, 

To-morrow I'll play some other play. 

Now in the cool October, say, 

What jewels are you stringing there ? 
They are scarlet beads the alders bear, 

Brighter than corals are, are, they ! 

Will they wear as well ? They will last to-day, 

To-morrow I'll play some other play. 



196 



JESSIE AND THE GOAT. 

Ha, wise little miss, who are always May, 
In spring or autumn, in rain or shine, 
If half your sweet content weve mine 

Bubbles might break and blooms decay, 

I would take to-day's gift for to-day, 

And trust to-morrow for some new way. 

GEO. S. BURLEIGH. 




JESSIE AND THE GOAT. 

" Dear me ! If only 1 could go home through the field ! " 
School was just out, and little Jessie May, warm and tired, 
looked longingly over the cool, green field. It was a much shorter 
way home, as well as more pleasant, to go through the field than 
to go around by the dusty road. But Mr. Rawson's goat was 
pastured there. He was a very cross old fellow, and the terror 
of the school-children. Mr. Rawson bad said that it was not at 
all safe for the small children to enter the field while the goat 
was there ; so going home that way this afternoon was not to 
be thought of. 

As Jessie cast a last longing look in that direction, before turn- 
ing down the dusty road, she gave a cry of delight : " Why, I do 
believe old Billy is gone ! I can't see him anywhere. Mr. Raw- 
son must have taken him out of the pasture." 



JESSIE AND THE GOAT. 



197 




Climbing upon the fence she looked long and carefully. No 
goat was in sight, so she jumped down from the fence into the 
long, cool grass of the field. 



198 



J EH 8 IE AND THE 00 AT. 



She had gone about half-way across, when Mr. Billy — who all 
this time had been lying buried in the deep grass, taking an after- 
noon nap — gathered himself up for a good shake. 

As he caught sight of Jessie tripping along, he gazed lor a 
moment in astonishment. It was only for a moment, for the next 
instant he gave his head a vicious shake, as though to sa}% " What 
right have you here, I should like to know?" and started in hot 
pursuit. 




Jessie soon heard the quick patter, patter, patter of his small 
feet. A terrified glance behind her showed her the goat, with 
lowered head, rushing directly at her. Oh, how swiftly she ran ; 
but he was overtaking her. 

Just as she despaired of making her escape, she saw a large 
stump where a tree had recently been cut down. It stood almost 
directly in her path, and was large enough for her to hide behind 
it. 

Quick as a flash off came her white apron, and was as quickly 



JESSIE AND THE GOAT. 



199 



tied around the stump, on the side toward which the goat was 
•coming. 

With a widely beating heart Jessie crouched behind the stump 
to await the result. 

She was completely hidden, and Mr. Goat, with head bent so 
low that he caught but a glimpse of the white apron, did not 
discover that it was the stump that wore it, and not Jessie. 

He came rushing on, and his head struck the stump with ter- 
rible force. 

All was still, and when the trembling little girl ventured to 
peep around the stump there lay the goat, apparently lifeless. 
Seizing her apron, she sped swiftly over the rest of the field, and 
was soon at home safe in her mother's arms. 

Was the goat killed ? Well, he was so badly stunned that he 
•did not revive for some time. 

When Jessie was on her way to school the next morning she 
met Mr. Rawson coming out of the pasture. He did not know, 
until Jessie told him, what hurt the goat. When she had finished 
telling him about it he said, " Well ! well ! I must say you have 
& wise little head, not to let your ' thinking-cap ' blow off as soon 
as you get frightened." 

MRS. C. O. HARRINGTON. 





PRETTY POLLY. 

"Pretty Polly" was a parrot, who lived with some children 
in the country. She was not kept in a cage. She flew about the 
house, and went out-doors. She could talk a great deal. She 
would sit on the fence or in a tree, and cry, " Whoa ! " to any 
horse that was going by, and he would stop quickly. Then Polly 
would laugh, and say, "Naughty Poll!" 

When the family were eating' she would fly up on the table, perch 
very near the butter, and put her bill into the very middle of it. 
Polly knew it was not right to do so, but butter was her favorite food. 

Ray, one of the boys who slept in a room near the kitchen, 
heard Polly trot across the floor to the open fire-place, where the 
big logs had been blazing all the evening. The fire was burning 
faintly, as Polly crept up to it. After a moment she said, " Polly 
so cold ! Oh ! so cold ! Poor Polly ! " Ray called to her, " Come, 
Polly, get into bed with me ; then you will be warm." Then, 
saying, " Polly so cold," she trotted into his room, climbed up on 
the bed. She crawled under the clothes, laid herself down on her 
back, and was soon sleeping soundly. 



PRETTY POLLY. 



201 



When Polly wanted to get into the house she would call, " James, 
let Polly in ! " If he did not open the door quickly she called, 
"Ja-mes, Tom is here!" So when he came to see if Tom was 
really at the door of the room she would fly, shouting, " Ha ! Ha ! 
Polly in! Pretty Polly!" 

Papa petted her, and she was very fond of him. When he came 




home at night she cried, " Polly want to see papa." He would 
take her on his arm, pat her head, and she showed her love for 
him by stroking his cheek with her bill and putting her head 
under his chin. 

Polly loved her home ; but, sad to say, she flew away and never 
came back again. But she was never forgotten by the children, 
and her cunning tricks were often spoken of by them. 

S. FANNIE GERRY WILDER. 




THE BIRDS' BABY-SHOW. 

Under the leaves there was heard such a flutter ; 

Robin, wren, bluebird, crow, humming-bird, jay, 
Bobolink, cat-bird, — all trying to utter, 

At the same time, their opinions that day. 

This was the question : which bird had the sweetest, 
The brightest, the prettiest birds in her nest. 

" I," said the humming-bird ; " mine are the neatest ! " 
"Mine," piped the robin, "I'm sure are the best!" 

"Where are such darlings as mine?" trilled the bluebird. 

"Beauties I have," bobolink sang; "come see!" 
" Each one of mine is a nice bird and true bird," 

Jenny Wren chirruped, " and takes after me ! " 

"Whose can compare with mine?" queried the cat-bird. 

" Yours ? " laughed the jay ; " don't be quite so absurd ! 
What's the opinion of this bird or that bird ? 

Mine are the best ! " " So are mine ! " cried each bird. 



"Mine! Mine! Mine! Mine!" set the whole greenwood ringing, 
Then the crow hoarsely cawed, as she flew from the spot, 

" For grace and for beauty, for sweetness and singing, 
My baby-birds are the pinks of the lot ! " 

GEORGE COOPER. 




HOW NOAH'S ARK WENT TO SCHOOL. 



Mamma was sick, and Aunt Tina had to stay with her a good 
deal. 

One afternoon, when mamma was feeling worse than usual. 
Aunt Tina coaxed Arthur, the youngest of her two nephews, to 
take a nap in his crib. She told Clarence to be a good boy, and 
not get into mischief, while she bathed mamma's head. 

Clarence was a warm-hearted little fellow, and loved both mamma 
and Aunt Tina dearly. He readily promised to be the best boy 
he knew how to be, and ran out in the yard to play. 



HOW NOAH'S AUK WENT TO SCHOOL. 205 

By and by, when mamma had dropped asleep, Aunt Tina went 
softly out of the room to see what Clarence was about, for he was 
full of mischief, and got into a good many scrapes. 

His playthings were strewn around the yard, — his rocking-horse, 
his kite, and bow and arrows ; but no Clarence could she find. 

Finally, away down the dusty road, she saw a little red figure 
plodding along as fast as possible out of sight. Fearful that he 
would be run over, or stray so far he would be lost, she hur- 
ried after him. He heard her coming, and, turning his head 
covered with yellow curls, saw her so near he started to run. 
His chubby feet and short legs were not equal to the long way- 
side grass and tall daisies, and he somehow got all tangled up in 
them. 

When Aunt Tina reached his side he was sitting half-buried in 
the grass and daisies and clover. His blue eyes were drowned in 
tears as he rubbed them with his fat, dirty little fists. When she 
picked him up in her arms to soothe him he sobbed out all his 
grief on her shoulder. 

" Dear Aunt Tina, see ! " pointing to a huge basket he had 
lugged with him, crammed full of the animals from his Noah's ark. 
They were now scattered in great disorder through the grass. 
" I was a-takin' Mr. Noah an' his fam'ly to school, so they could 
learn to spell an' read like other boys, an' not have to always 
keep still. An' now — an' now they's all losted or broke, an' me'll 
never find 'em, an' — " 

His grief was too deep for words. But after a while Aunt Tina 
comforted him and helped him find all the men and animals. 
Hand in hand they trudged back home to tell mamma how he 
tried to take Noah and his family to school and couldn't. 

J. K. LUDLTJM. 




Sue wanted to give Bridget a present. Papa had 

given her a trunk, and mamma a nice new dress ; so 

Sue wanted to put something in the trunk that was going 

across the ocean to Ireland. 

She decided to get some candy ; so, after breakfast, she ran down 

the street to a candy store. 

" I want some candy," she said. "■ Bridget loves candy." 
" How much ? " 
" A whole lot." 

" Here's a pound," said the clerk ; " will that be enough ? " 
"Thank you. If you please," said Sue. 
She took it and turned to leave the store. 

" Stop'," cried the clerk, " you haven't paid for it. Give me the 
money, little girl ! " 







wu^Wf^ ■■■■ - 



SUE 'S DANDELION-GREENS. 



207 



" What money ? " asked Sue. 

" For the candy. You cannot have candy without money." 
" But I haven't got no money," sobbed Sue. 
" Go and find some. Then you shall have the candy." 
Sue went home swiftly. She had never been in a store alone 
before, and the man's words bewildered her. 




She met Bridget at the door. " Where do you find money, 
Bridget ? " she asked. 

" Bless my pretty ! " said Bridget. " I don't find money, I earn it, 
child." 

Sue ran upstairs. " Where do you find money, mamma ? " she 
asked. 



208 



S UE 'S DANDELION-GREENS. 



Her mamma wondered what she meant, and resolved that she 
would ask her when she was not so busy. " People don't find much 
money, darling," she answered; " they earn it." 

Sue asked no more questions. She took her doll and went into 
the orchard. Pretty soon a small boy looked over the fence and said, 

" Will you let me pick 
some o' them dande- 
lions ?". 

-What for?" 
" To sell to folks as 
likes 'em for greens." 

" That's funny," said 
Sue, " to buy dande- 
lions.'' 
,,..,, "It's fun to earn the 

^V^^^^S^^^^^^^f; r money," said the ragged 

boy, as Sue opened the 
gate. 

Sue knew now how 
people earned money. 
They sold dandelions. 
She ran into the house and got a knife and a pan. 

"Mamma will buy mine," she said, -'and Aunt Lizzie will buy 
yours. She lives across the street." 

Sue and the boy worked until Bridget rang the dinner-bell. 
" That's for me ; but you can come too," said Sue, "and after 
dinner we'll pick some more." 

" You've got a lot now. Them's worth ten cents." 
Sue flew into the house. " Mamma," she cried, " the boy says my 
greens are worth ten cents." 

" Dandelion-greens," said her papa ; " and nice ones ! Well, Sue." 
handing her a dime, " there is your pay." 

" Why did you pick them, dear ? " asked her mamma. 
"To earn money," answered Sue. "The man wouldn't give me 
the candy unless I earned money. And the boy sells dandelions, 
and he wants his dinner, mamma." 




TEDDY ^IND JOE. 



209 



So,' after dinner, the boy went away, happy, and jingling the 
pennies in his pocket ; and Sue went for her candy. 

" Here 'tis," said the clerk ; " I thought you'd find some money." 
"I picked dandelions," said Sue. 



MARY A. SAWYER. 



TEDDY AND JOE. 

Teddy and Joe, two in a row, 

Up hill and down hill together they go. 

Joe's a big man, Teddy, a boy ; 
But both know the arts that the insects 
employ. 



Both know the spot, in the 
green wood's deep shade, 

"Where the squirrels and 
birdies their treasures 
have laid. 

In vain for a bird, flower, 

or insect to hide 
In the deep-tangled growth 

of the rank riverside ; 

For bright eyes are peering 
through forest and field, 

Are searching so closely the 
secrets they yield. 



So day after day, in the summer's full joy, s. 
Go Joe the professor, and Teddy the boy. 



sw* 




AGNES G. GRAY. 



FLOWERS THAT HIDE FROM THE SUN. 




OU have heard how- 
fond some flowers are 
of the sunlight. There 
are others that do 
not like it at all. 

The dandelion always 
draws up its little petals 
to hide its bright face from 
the glare of the sun. Some 
are very brave when it first 
begins to shine in the morn- 
ing-, but a;ive out before noon. 

The pretty morning-glory and four-o'clock 
can hardly stand it at all, and shut up very 
tight. If it is cloudy they keep their sweet 
cups open a good while longer. 

The small flower of the convolvulus and the 
flower of the lettuce both open at seven in 
the morning and close before ten. 

Many of these queer flowers are as good as 
clocks to tell the time of day. Long before 
they were invented the people used flowers 
instead. 

MRS. G. HALL. 




B 



Washington, May, i£?>a 



ear Little Ones'' n T ,,_, „ 

One day Het and J were playing Hag on the pavement in 

FRONT OF OUR HOUSE, WHEN SUCH A FUNNY LOOKING BOY CAME ALONG. J-fE WAS DRESSED 
SOMETHING LIKE A GIRL, AND HIS HAIR WAS PLAITED DOWN HIS BRCK IN A LONG TAIL .WITH 
A SILK TASSEL ON THE END OF IT. JfE STOPPED AND LOOKED AT US AND Pet SAID HE 
SMILED REAL NICE IF HIS EYES WERE "JUST LIKE BUTTON-HOLES, SO SHE ASKED HIM TO PLAY 
WITH US, AND HE DID , AND WE HAD A SPLENDID GAME OF^'Tag'.' V/HEN THE LITTLE BOY A( 
WOULD CATCH US HE WOULD PRETEND TO WHIP US WITH HIS PIG-TAIL AND WE UKEO HIM VE- 
RY MUCH. /InNIE WAS WATCHIWG US FROM THE WINDOW. PRESENTLY SHE WENT AWAY AND 
WHEN SHE CAME BACK MAMMA WAS WITH HER. A\aMMA SMILED AT US, THEN SHE OPENED «■ 

the window and told us all to come in. "]& little boy didn't want to but j made 
him. When we got in the house mamma talked to the little boy, and he bowed a 
great many times and was very polite though you couldn't understand what he said 
very well. /^mma told us that he had come f to "washington from a place a long 

WAY OFF CALLED ChiNA, AND SHE SAID HE WA3 a"nICE CHILD"AND VERY WELL BEHAVED AND 
THAT HE MUST COME TO SEE US ACAIN. qE PLAYS WrTH US OFTEN NOW AND HIS NAME 13 

Chun6,ano he is a Chinese nobleman. Chung went with us to see the big Washington 

MONUMENT THE OTHER DW. PAPA TOOK US. Jt IS THE HIGHEST MONUMENT IN THE WORLte 

AND YOU CAN SEE IT FROM ALMOST EVERY SPOT IN THE CITY. "Wf. WENT CLOSE UP TO *g 
IT THE OTHER. DAY AND WHEN WE LOOKED WAY UP AT THE TOP IT MADE US FEEL VERY -gjj 
LITTLE. PET SAID SHE FELT ABOUT AS BIG AS ONE OF HER LEAO SOL0IER3. HERE IS°3sj| 

fl PICTURE [ MADE OF THE MONUMENT THE LONG BLACK MARK AT THE BOTTOM IS 2g 

PAPA AND THE OTHERS ARE C.HUNG AND Pet AND ME. TOUR UTTLE FRIEND, _^3 

Frankie^w ,„i J 



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Tom lived on the bank of 
the river. His father had 
a boat in which he could 
go down to fish. Sometimes 
he would take Tom with him and let him row. 

Tom had a little sister whom they called Dot (because she was 

so small for her age). One day Tom's mother asked him if he 

could take care of Dot while she went to the city. Tom was very 

fond of his little sister, and he promised to take good care ol 

'her. And this is the way he did it. 

Tom thought it would be nice to take Dot down to the river 
and show, her papa's boat. The boat was pulled partly on shore, 
while the remainder was in the water. 

Tom knew if he and Dot got into the boat they could get good 
motion by his rocking it. So he lifted Dot in and then jumped 
in himself. Then he began to rock the boat. Dot had never been 
in a boat before, and she was delighted with the motion. 

Tom ! the bank's gone and left 



By and by Dot exclaimed, 




HOW TOM TOOK CARE OF DOT. 



213 



us." Tom turned to see what Dot meant, and found that the boat 
had broken from the bank, and they were floating down the stream 
without any oars. Tom was very much frightened. He remem- 
bered his promise to his mother to take good care of Dot ; but 
he was a very brave little fellow, and did not let Dot know of 
his fear. 

"Dot, you'll sit very still, won't you?" asked Tom. 




Dot promised. Tom wondered if they would have to stay on 
the river all night. 

But they did not. A kind fisherman found them, took them 
into his boat, and rowed them back to their papa and mamma. 
They were so glad to have them safe in their arms again that 
they didn't scold Tom. They knew he meant no harm, and Tom's 
fear was his own punishment. He never ventured into dangerous 
places with his little sister again. 

KATIE KYLE. 




x l".i 



HAWKS AND HOLLYHOCKS. 



When little Jessie went from the city to visit her aunt the 
country was new and strange to her. She wondered at nearly 
everything. Seeing a brood of chickens, she said, " aunty, what 

a many canaries ! " 

She knew cut flowers verj' well, 
but had seen few flowers growing. 
Tbe garden was her delight. She 
learned the names of the plants. 
§||>- Some hollyhocks seemed like trees in 
bloom, reaching high above the little 
straw hat. 

One day Jessie heard her uncle 
say he feared the hawks would catch 
the chickens. " That large one," 
said he, " looked wicked when watch- 
ing for a chance." 

Jessie got down from her chair at 
the table and went straight to the 
garden. There her aunt found her standing soberly among the 
hollyhocks. 

" I guess they haven't caught any yet," said Jessie. 
" What do you mean ? " her aunt inquired. 





HAWKS AND HOLLYHOCKS. 



216 



HAWKS AND HOLLYHOCKS. 




" Holl} T hocks and chickens," replied the child. " Uncle spoke of 
this great one. I would cut it down if it catches chickens." 

" you little city girl ! " smiled 
her aunt. " Don't you know hawks 
are birds ? I will show you one 
when he comes hunting around 
again. You shall see how swiftly 
his pointed wings carry him through 
the air." 
" Does he peep ? " asked Jessie, looking up at the sky. " For I 
saw a bird sailing round and round, crying, ; Peep ! Peep ! ' 

"That might be a night-hawk," said her aunt. " Night-hawks do 
no harm. But hawks, too, sail and cry in that way. When the 
hen hears one she makes haste to call her brood under her wings. 
The little things learn the danger, and, hearing the voice of a hawk, 
run and hide beneath the mother. Then she makes a low sound 
that they know means, ' Keep out of sight, children.' ' 

Then her aunt added, " I came to the garden for flowers to fill 
the vases, and you may help to cut them, Jessie." 

LAVINIA S. GOODWIN. 




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FRED'S STOLEN BIDE. 



One day little Fred's mother, who had been sick a long time, told 
him she was going out with a friend to take a drive. Fred wanted to 
go, too, but his mother said there would not be room in the buggy. 
Fred felt very cross and unhappy, and sat down on the front steps, 
ready to cry as soon as he should see his mother go away. 

A buggy came to the 
gate, and the gentleman 
who was driving went 
into the house. Fred 
ran out and climbed 
into the buggy to sit 
there until his mother 
came out. 

In looking around he 
saw there was a wide 
space under the seat, in 
which a boy might hide. 
He crawled in, thinking 
he would take a ride, 
and his mother would 
not know it. 

He waited a long 
time, but no one came, 
and at last he grew 
tired and fell asleep. 
He was waked by feeling a big jolt, as a wheel of the buggy struck 
a stone ; but he kept still. After what seemed to him a long time 
the buggy stopped and he heard some one taking the horse from the 
shafts. He waited until all was quiet, and then crawled out from his 
hiding-place. 




FEED'S STOLE X EWE. 



219 



He found it was almost dark, and everything about him was strange. 
He was very much frightened, but he jumped down and went to a 




farm-house close by. A woman he had never seen before came to the 
door. When he told her where he lived she said he was fifteen miles 
from home, and he found that he had taken his stolen ride in the 
buggy of a man who had called to see his father on business. 

It was too late for Fred to go home that night, and he had to stay 
at the farmer's house until the next day. Then he was taken home, 
and I am very sure he never tried to steal another ride. 

FLORENCE B. HALLOWELL. 




A SMALL PHILOSOPHER. 



Ted and Uncle Ned went nutting 



s>? 



On a pleasant autumn day, 
When the wood was warm and sunny, 

And the squirrels were at play ; 
When the yellow leaves kept falling 

Softly, softly, to the ground ; 
And the ripe, brown nuts were dropping, 

Pat-pat-patter, all around. 



A RACE AND WHO WON IT. 



221 



Happy Teddy's blue eyes sparkled. 

And his cheek glowed like a rose ; 
But just then a falling shagbark 

Struck him plump upon bis nose. 
"Oh!" he cried and laughed together, 

" What a dreadful thing 'twould be 
If the nuts were big as pumpkins 

Growing on this hickory tree ! " 



LUCY WILLING. 




Jack, the donkey, was going along in a quiet 
trot with Jack, the boy, on his back, and Jack, the dog, alongside. 
"Let's have a race ! " cried Jack, the boy. 
" Let's have a race ! " whinnied Jack, the donkey. 
" Let's have a race ! " barked Jack, the dog. 



222 



A RACE AND WHO WON IT. 






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30 



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" Whoever gets to the cross-roads first, wins," shouted Jack, the 
boy. 

" All right," barked Jack, the dog. 

" Well, I'd like to know," whinnied Jack, the donkey, " which one 
of us two '11 win if we reach the cross-roads before the dog, for you're 
sitting on my back." 

"I never thought of that," said Jack, the boy; "I suppose we'll 
have to say we both win. If I were to run I'd have no chance with 
you two." 

" Of course not," assented Jack, the donkey ; " stick on, and may 
be, after all, you'll get there before me." 

" Keep your place," barked Jack, the dog. 

"One, two, three," counted Jack, the boy; " one, two, three, and 



away 



A RAGE AND WHO WON IT. 



223 



And away they ran ; one minute the two Jacks ahead, the next 
minute the one. But, although they were going so fast, Jack, the 
donkey, was busily thinking, and this is what he thought : — 




" Jack, the boy, is only eight years old, and his whole heart is set 
upon winning this race. Now, I'm nigh on to a hundred and eight 
if I'm correct, and the other fellow is only a dog. I'm determined 
that the boy Jack shall win." 

And the dog was thinking too, and this is what he thought : — 



224 



A RACE AND WHO WON IT. 




ptep*- 



" I certainly do wish that boy could win the race, but I don't wish 
to be beaten by a donkey." 

They were still alongside when the cross-roads came in sight ; then 
the dog was left behind, for the donkey started ahead at a wonderful 
pace. When within a yard of the appointed place he gently tossed 
the boy Jack over his head, right on to the cross-roads. 

Jack landed on his feet in breathless astonishment. 

Well," he exclaimed, " I declare if I didn't get here first, after 
all ! " 

And Jack, the donkey, whinnied, and Jack, the dog, barked. 

LOUISE R. BAKER. 




"Used Up, 



jj 



"Tired Out," "No Energy," and simi- 
lar expressions, whenever heard, indi- 
cate a lack of vital force, which, if not 
remedied in time, may lead to com- 
plete physical and nervous prostration. 
Ayer's Sarsaparilla is the hest medi- 
cine to vitalize the hlood, build up the 
tissues, and make the weak strong. 

" For nearly three months I was con- 
fined to the house. One of the most 
celebrated physicians of Philadelphia 
failed to discover the cause of my 
trouble or afford relief. I continued in 
a bad way until about a month ago 
when I began to take Ayer's Sarsapa- 
rilla. It acted like a charm. I have 
gained flesh and strength and feel ever 
so much better. Shall continue using 
the Sarsaparilla until completely cured." 
— John V. Craven, Salem, N. J. 

"I find Ayer's Sarsaparilla to be an 
admirable remedy for the cure of blood 
diseases. I prescribe it, and it does the 
work every time." — E. L. Pater, M. D., 
Manhattan, Kansas. 

Be sure and ask for 

Ayer's Sarsaparilla. 

PREPARED BY 

Dr. J. C. Ayer & Co., Lowell, Mass. 
Price $1; six bottles, $5. Worth $5 a bottle. 



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ARE THE BEST. ■ 



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Sample Card containing one of each of the above Pens 
sent for trial, postpaid, on receipt of 6 cts. in stamps. 



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753 and 755 Broadway, New York;. 




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The Snowblack are the hest black half-hose in the market* 
They are fast and unfading, soft and glossy, and so dyed as not 
to he tender. Some processes for dyeing black weaken the 
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The Snowblack are Shawknit, and so are nice fitting and 
comfortable. 



Send for Descriptive Postpaid Price-list, 

SHAW STOCKING CO. 

LOWELL, MASS. 



Corticelli Wash Silk. 




Prepared expressly 
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materials which re- 
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Colors warranted not 
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or solid embroidery. 
Ten yard skeins ; (2) 
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a fine size of high lus- 
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owing to its slack twist 
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Send 6 cts in stamps 
for sample, stating 
grade desired 



NOHOTUCI 



SILK CO. 

18 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON. 

(SOLE MANUFACTURERS.) 



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MEISTERSCHAFT PUBLISHING CO., Herald Building, Boston, Mass. 



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ANTED Everybody to try our 
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Now's your time to get up clubs 
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100p^GEILL*DrAMPDLET WITL1 : 
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PEERLESS DYES 



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Our Club Rates with other Publications. 



Any person desiring to subscribe to other publications in connection with Our Little Ones can do 
so at a greatly reduced rate, by sending direct to this office. We will club Oun Little Onus with any publica- 
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Scribner's Magazine, P4 00 

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Babyhood 2 50 

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Christian at Work W 00 

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Scientific American * 00 

Sunday School Times 3 00 

Demorest's Monthly 3 0D 

Arthur's Home Magazine 3 °^ 

Godey's Ladies Book 3 ° 3 

Peterson's Magazine 3 D:> 

American Agriculturist 2 c0 

The Cottage Hearth. 
The Household. , 



2 CO 
2 00 



Chatterbox 2 M 



Littell's Living Ago. 
Dorcas 

St. Louis Magazine . . 



8 50 
2 25 
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The prices given above are for Our Little Ones and any of the publications named, for one year, includ- 
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but both need not necessarily go to one address, or commence with the same issue. 

RUSSELL PUBLISHING COMPANY, 

36 Bromfleld Street, Boston, Mass. 



BROWN'S FRENCH DRESSING. 

The Original. Beware of Imitations. 
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ranted seven times the strength of 
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It holds like a vice. It mends everything. 

THE STANDARD FOR THIRTY YEARS. 

2-ounce bottle, 25 cents with brush. 

Sold Everywhere. 



the LARGE DEEV1AND 

FOB 

GOOD SENSE 

?/ CORDED CORSET WAISTS 

For Ladies, Misses and Children 

gives an opportunity to unprincipled 
dealers to offer 

INFERIOR IMITATIONS 

under various nameB, upon 

which they can make a larger 

profit,sayingtheyare , *aboiii; 

as erood as the (-OOi) 

SENSE Waist." 
THEY ARE NOT AS GOOD. 

B5?*Be sure your Corset is 
stamped "Good Sense. 55 

Sold by all Leading Retailers. 
Send for Circular. 

Dlanofactorers, 

NEWVOKK 




FERRIS BROS, 



PEERLESS DYES 



Are the r.E>T. 

Sold by Druugists, 



CARNRICKS^rFOOD 



Perfectly nourishes the child from birth, without the addition of cow's milk, 
and digests a3 easily as human milk. Send for "Our Baby's First and Second 
Years," by Marion Harland, REED & CARNRICK, New York. 




GOLD MEDAL, PARIS, 1878. 

BAKER'S 



Warranted absolutely pure 
Cocoa, from which the excess of 
Oil has been removed. It has three 
times the strength of Cocoa mixed 
with Starch, Arrowroot or Sugar, 
and is therefore far more economi- 
cal, coating less than one cent a 
cup. It Is delicious, nourishing, 
strengthening, easily digested, and 
admirably adapted for invalids as 
well as for persons in health. 
Sold by Grocers eve rywhere. 

BAKER S CO., Dorctaster, Mass, 
M 



JOSEPH CILLOTTS 

STEEL PENS 

Sold By- ALL DEALERSThroughoutIhe WORLD 
GOLD MEDAL PARIS EXP0SITI0N-IS7S. 



CANDY 



Send Si, 52, $3, or $5 for a retail 
box by express of the beBt candies 
in America, put up elegantly, and 
Btrictly pure. Suitable for presents. 
Refers to all Chicago. Address 



GUNrHER, Confectioner, 21% State St., Chicago. 




For The Nervous 
The Debilitated 
The Aged 




I DRES Nervous Prostration, NervousHead- 
■ ache, Neuralgia, NervousWeakness, 
r Stomach and Liver Diseases, and all 
affections of the Kidneys. 

AS A NERVE TONIC, It Strengthens 
and Quiets the Nerves. 

AS AN ALTERATIVE, It Purifies and 
Enriches the Blood. 

AS A LAXATIVE, It acts mildly, but 
surely, on the Bowels. 

AS A DIURETIC, It negates the Kid- 
neys and Cures their Diseases. 
Recommended by professional and businessmen. 
Price $r oo. Sold by druggists. Send for circulars. 

WELLS, RICHARDSON & CO., Proprietors. 
BURLINGTON, VT. 




Its superior excellence proven in millions of homes for 
more than a quarter of a century. It is used by the United 
States Government. Endorsed by the heads of the Great 
Universities as the Strongest, Pure9t, and most Healthful. 
Dr. Price's the only Baking Powder that does not contain 
Ammonia, Lime, or Alum. Sold only in Cans. 

PRICE BAKING POWDER CO., 

NEW YORK. CHICAGO. ST. LOUIS. 



BOSTON BUREAU OF ADVERTISING 




J 

?6 BROMFIELD ST., Boston, Mass. 



Magazine, 

Newspaper and 
Specialty Advertising. 

Advertisements inserted in any 
publication at publishers lowest 
rates. 

Special attention given to the 
preparation and illustration of ad- 
vertisements. 



Exclusive Advertising Agents for 

"Our Little Ones and The Nursery," 



Bound volumes *' 
of 



CHATTERBOX," 



and other 
publications. 



Special Agents for 

SCRIBNER'S MAGAZINE, 

"HOUSEHOLD," " COTTAGE HEARTH," 

" BABYHOOD," AND 

"GOOD HOUSEKEEPING." 

Correspondence solicited and estimates furnished for any 
desired line of advertising. 

GEORGE A. POXOROFT, 

Manager. 



DURKEE'S 



GAUNTLET BRAND 




*££*<" SPICES 
* MUSTARD. 

SOLD ONLY IN FULL WEIGHT SEALED PACKAGES. 

Guaranteed absolutely pure, and warranted to excel 
all others in strength, richness, flavor and cleanliness. 



DURKEE'S 



SALfiD DRESSING 

UNEQUALLED FDR 
EXCELLENCE 

Without a rival as a dressing for all Salads, and as s 
sauce for Cold Meats, etc. It is prepared with extreme 
care ; nil its ingredients are of the purest and best; 
and will keep good for years. 

BEWAKB OF ALL. IMITATIONS 





This is the way we wash ourhands, 

c ; t Wash our hanc/sl' 
Wash our hands" 
This is the way we wash our hands " 
"With PEARS' SOAP in the morning! 3 



4- 




RECLAIMED. 



We once were factious, fierce, and wild, 
To peaceful arts unreconciled; 
Our blankets smeared with grease and stains 
From buffalo meat and settlers' veins. 
Through summer's dust and heat content, 
From moon to moon unwashed we went ; 
But Ivory Soap came like a ray 
Of light across our darkened way. 



And now we're civil, kind and good, 
And keep the laws as people should. 
We wear our linen, lawn and lace, 
As well as folks with paler face. 
And now I take, where'er we go, 
This cake of Ivory Soap to show 
What civilized my squaw and me 
And made us clean and fair to see. 



A WORD OF WARNING. 

There are many white soaps, each represented to be " just as good as the ' Ivory ' ; " 
they ARE NOT, but like all counterfeits, lack the peculiar and remarkable qualities of 
the genuine. Ask for " Ivory " Soap and insist upon getting it. 

Copyright 1SSG, by Procter & Gamble. 



*o- 





___ and Sons, London. 

Copyright, 1888, by Rdbsbix Publishing Company. 1 rEntered at tbe P O. at Boston aa'second-clasaniatter. 



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Lavinia S. Goodwin 



THE SEA'S HARVEST 

(Illustrated by Edmund H. Garreu.) 

A FAIRY CRADLE Mrs. Mary Johnson . . . 

(.Illustrated by Miss E. S. Tucker.) 

SPRING Emma C. Down 

( Illustrated by Edith F. Foster.) 

THE RED DRAGON Clara G. Dolliver . . . 

(Illustrated by F. T. Merrill.) 

WHAT THE BLUE-EYED GRASS SAW . . Annie E. Jerome 

(Illustrated by Irene K. Jerome.) 

SAMMY'S BOAT . . . Pink Hunter 

(Illustrated by L. D. Norton.) 

JUNE L. B. C 

(Illustrated by Lizbeth 1J. Cproins.) 

FRANKIE'S LETTER. FRANK IE HAS THE" MEASLES . . . . Frankie 

(Illustrated by Jessie MeDermuii.) 

THE THREE LITTLE GOOSEY-GOSLINGS . E. Annette Hills .... 

.(Illustialed by Parker Hayden.) 

PLAYING STATION Florence B. Hallowell . 

(Illustrated by J. H. Hatfield.) 

SUGARING OFF Clara Doty Bates . . . 

(Illustrated by J. H. Hatfield.) 

SENSITIVE PLANTS Mrs. G. Halt 

(Illustrated by H. P. Barnes.) 

THE LITTLE DAIRY MAID Robert Ogden Fowler , 

(illustrated by Alice Hirschberji.) 

BETTY'S PLAYTHINGS Virginia C. Hollis . . . 

(Illustrated by F. W. Freer) 

BUILDING THE NEST Elizabeth A. .Davis . . . 

(Illustrated by Louis Meynelle.) 

THE DODDER-WHIP Julia P. Ballard .... 

(Illustrated by Miss E. S. Tucker.) 



PAG 

22 

22 
-3 
2 3 

2 i 
=3 
-3 

23 

4 

24 



The Illustrative Department under the direction of Mr. Gkori;e T. Andrew. 



OUR LITTLE ONES AND THE NURSERY, 



One Year . . . 
Sixteen Months 



Two Copies, one year 
Three Copies, " 



{MONTHLY.) 

TERMS (in advance). 

. $1.50. Eight Months $1 

2.00. Single Copies . . 15 cents 



CLUB RATES. 

$2.80. Four Copies, one year 

4.00. Five Copies, 



$5. 

e.c 



Subscriptions: — Change of post-office address can be made by giving the old as well as t 
new address, but not without' this information. Notice should be received the hist of the precedl 
month. 

Remittances are at risk of the publishers only when sent by Postal Order, American Exprt 
Order, Check, or Registered Letter. Checks, Drafts, and ( Irders should be made payable to the 

RUSSELL PUBLISHING COMPANY, BOSTON, MAI 



FINE COMPLEXION, SMOOTH, SOFT SKIN. 

Mention Our Little Onfs, and semi four cents for sample of PACKER'S TAR SO A I'. Use it e' 
night with warm water ami rough wash-cloth, ami you will lie gratified with soft, smooth skin ami impro' 
complexion. Do not hesitate to use PACKER'S TAR SOAI' on your face. It is absolutely pure, bli 
and grateful to the senses. It is adapted and extensively used for washing the delicate skin of infants, am 
the treatment of skin ami scalp diseases. It prevents Chapping, Chafing and Uedness ; cures Itching, Dandr 
Acne, etc., and is an invaluable antiseptic purifier for offensive perspirations, discharges, etc. 2So. Druggists 

Ti -mn PACKER 3VXI*G-. CO., IOO Fulton Street, New Yort 




THE SEAS HARVEST. 




1S88 

Copyright, 1888, by Russell Publishing Company. 



No. 8. 



THE SEA'S HARVEST. 

Oh, 'tis merry in Normandie, 
When the fishers come back from sea ; 
Buyers are tracking the white sands then, 
Maidens and women, lads and men. 

" Fresh soles ! " 1 they cry. " Who buys, who buys ? 
Count your money and take your prize ; 
Francs if you have them, or only sous ; 
Big fish are biggest, small will do. 

" Blue-eyed Frowsy, this has your mark ; 
Took him aboard for you in the dark ; 
A gentle fellow, with dreamy eye, 
Begging ' Please boil me, miss, or fry.' 

" Men, with your pipes, be not afraid ; 
What are you here for but to trade ? 
Finish the business, then home and dine 
On best of soles and good red wine. 

1 A kind of flat fish. 



228 A FAIRY CRADLE. 

" Dames, with kerchiefs and caps like snow. 
Fill your baskets, — away you go! 
What are offered for this fine pair. 
Sent to you by a sea-nymph fair ? 

''See this sole, that measures an ell; 

So bis; it will make a a;ood umbrel' ; 

Very well ! he is yours, and so cheap ; 

A few more, friends, and don't go to sleep." 

Oh, 'tis merry in Normandie, 

When the boats come laden from sea ; 

Fishers and people meet on the sands, 

And jest, while soles and cash change hands. 

LAVINIA S. GOODWIN. 



A FAIRY CRADLE. 



Robbie found some queer little things, that looked like dry 
leaves rolled up. 

"I wonder what they are?" he said. "Maybe thej-'re fairies' 
cradles. I wish I could see a fairy come out." 

Mamma had told him a fairy-story the night before. He took 
them into the house to show to her ; but she was out. So he put 
them in a little pasteboard box, which he set on the closet-shelf 
in her room. He meant to tell her, but forgot all about it. 

The queer little rolls stayed there for two or three months, till 
the pleasant fall weather was over, and winter had come. But 
mamma's room was always warm. If fairy-babies had been there 
they would have been very snug and comfortable. 



A FAIRY CRADLE. 



No one noticed the little box. One evening, when Robbie was 
fast asleep, his mother sat reading rather late in her room. The 




house was very quiet. After a while she heard a queer noise, — 
tap, tap, tap, — as if somebody knocked. But the taps were very 
light, and she could not think what made them. 



230 



A FAIRY CRADLE. 



She looked about the room, and opened the closet. She found 
the tapping was inside the little box. 

"What can it be?" she thought. She lifted the cover, which 
was not very tight ; and out Hew something as beautiful and bright 
as a fairy. It was a large butterfly, blue and gold and black and 
crimson ; one of the prettiest she had ever seen. 

It was very strange to see a live butterfly in winter. What 
Robbie found was a chrysalis. 

The caterpillar spins threads around itself, and makes a cradle 
or nest. In this it sleeps all winter, and in the spring is changed 
into a butterfly. But the warmth of the room had made this one 
come out much sooner. 

Robbie's mamma Avas puzzled. She did not like to let the pretty 
creature starve ; and there were no g-ardens in winter for him to 
fly into, and get his breakfast. But her ba} r -window was full of 
house-plants. She caught the butterfly in a glass jelly-dish, and 
carried him to the flowers. So he was very happy as long as he 
lived. 

This strange event really happened. 

MRS. MARY JOHNSON. 






* 



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vMMUfM 



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aa 



O? ^J 3 fee etlef 




Jack's brother Tom save him a 
Chinese-Dragon kite, with wings like 
a great red bird. The boys all said 
that nothing like it had ever been 
seen in town. 
They sent him up, and pulled him in, and 
sent him up again, just for the fun of it. 
But just the last time, when they were going 
to Jet him sail away as far as he would, a. 
cruel telegraph wire caught him by the tail 
and held him fast. Jack tu^ed at the 
string until it broke. Then the boys said it was of no use trying 
any more. One by one they went oil', leaving poor Jack standing 
in the street alone, gazing up at his dear Dragon, flapping help- 
lessly so far above him. He tried hard not to cry, but he could 
not help a vagrant tear that slipped out of his eye. and stole 
down the side of his nose. He put his arms round the pole with 
some wild idea of climbing it. Then he a;ot a lath from a new 
building, and tried to reach the captive. He put that down and 
wiped the tear, which was now very cold, off the end of his nose, 
and swallowed a great lump that would come in his throat. 

Just then a man came along, crying, " Tins to mend ! " It 
sounded like " Hings to bings!" but everybody knew what he 
meant. 

" Hullo, boy ! " he said. " Is that your kite ? " 



THE RED DRAGON. 233 

Jack nodded ; he couldn't speak for the lump in his throat. 

The man looked up at the Dragon, then down at Jack. Per- 
haps he thought of some other little boy, or of himself as a child 
in his poor home far away across the seas. At any rate his face 
looked very kind. 




He took the long lath over to the new building and nailed it 
to a still longer one ; with this he reached the Dragon. 

The tail was now twisted many times around the wire ; and it 
took time and patience to uncurl it, but at last the pride of kites 
was released. 

As it came fluttering to the ground, the man picked up his 



little furnace and was off, crying, 
could even thank him. 



Hincrs to bines !" before Jack 



CLAliA O DOLLIVEK. 



A-ting-a-lirig-a-ling, 

Dame Nature holds the bell ; 
She calls her little wild-flowers 

Their stories sweet to tell. 
The bright-hued scholars pass, 

Their lessons are not long; 
Listen ! the blue-eyed grass 

Repeats his little ^ song. 





I slumbered very late, 

And wakened none too soon ; 
The butterflies were laughing, — 

I saw 'twas really June. 
I opened wide my eyes 

And took a peep around ; 
I saw coy Mrs. Buttercup 

With golden glory crowned. 



I saw a little bird 
A-trying hard to fly. 

I saw a little cloud 
With eyes of violet-blue 

1 said, "Oil, pretty one, 
Come here and kiss me 



ANNIE E. JEROME 




Sammy lived very near the river, and, being a small boy, had little 
else to do than to play. He liked to watch the boats, big and little, 
that plied up and down the broad sheet of water, and had a little 
fleet of his own. He could not make his boats very well. Some 
were too heavy, and some a little one-sided, and they had a way 
of sailing upside down. 



■. 







236 SAMMY'S BOAT. 

One day Sammy was sitting as usual on the shore when he saw a 
little vessel sailing towards him with very different rigging from any 
of his own make. She was well-shaped, with a keel and masts, and 
had been painted, but the water had washed off much of the paint. 
She was, in fact, a toy vessel, such as Sammy had never seen before in 
all his life. It had drifted away from its owner far down the river. 



**?. 




- 



Sammy jumped up, and tried to reach it with a long pole, but it 
was too far out, and he nearly fell into the water. Just then a fishing- 
boat came up, with two men rowing it. One of them was a great 
friend of Sammy's, and often took him out fishing with him. He 
captured the tiny vessel and brought it in shore with him. 

Sammy clapped his hands with delight, and seized his treasure to 
examine it more closely. Some of the rigging was broken, but Sam- 
my's friend mended it up, and the little boat was soon afloat again. 
Sammy fastened a long line to it, so that his prize may not drift away 
from him. 

PINK HUNTER. 




Wul; 1/cr 
7° its sj?e 7^5 

otWrcwea.1: 






Ji^be tj?ft/^\wc 







^ 3 %P^a s l e 5 



J/\|aSHINGTON, cK'NE, 189^^^ 

Dear "Little Ones" _ 

Pet and ] have got the /Measles. Did any of you ever 
have; them? |hey dont hurt much but you get awful tired of stayins in 
one room and having shawls put round you every time you go to the win- - 
dow. i felt pretty sick the other day. mamma took. me on her lap and rocked 
me. [ thought when j sot big enough to wear pants that ] wouldn't want a\am- 
ma to rock me like a baby. but when my head ached so [ thought- it was the 
NICEST THING SHE COULD DO. Pet AND J HAVEN'T SEEN EACH OTHER FOR A LONG TIME 
BUT WE WRITE NOTES TO EACH OTHER. \{tK IS ONE PeT WROTE ME WITH A PICTURE 
SHE DREW HERSELF. /\Y EYES ARE NOT STRONG YET AND |\/uRSE WONT LET ME USE THEM 
MUCH SO J MUST 5T0P NOW. "YouR LITTLE FRIEND, 

FrANKIE 




; 




eaf\ France 



MOW DO YOUR A\EA8LES FEEL 

now? Mine feel bad and I look, just like 

THIS -|lll YOUF\ KWD FP\.END, 



THE THREE LITTLE GOOSEY-GOSLINGS. 



There were once three little yellow and white goslings who had 
no mother. One day they went uut walking and met an old gray 
goose. 




"Good-morn 
ing," said the 
goose. "Where 
are you going 
this fine morn- 
ing?" H^&Sfifil 

" We are hunt- 
ing for a home," 

said the three little yellow and white goslings ; " and we don't know 
where to go." 

"Come with me," said the gray goose. " I have a nice home in a 
barrel up by the barn, and no little goslings to put in it. Come with 
me, and I will be your mother." 

The three little yellow and white goslings bobbed their heads and 
looked so pleased that the old goose wanted to kiss them, only she 
didn't know how. 



240 



THE THREE LITTLE GOOSEY-GOSLINGS. 



So she started off for her barrel and the three little gosling's wad- 
died after. But there was an old fox watching them from behind a 
tree. 

"Ha! ha!" said the fox to himself. "I see three little yellow 
and white goosey-goslings. I think I'll catch one for my supper." 

He crept softly through the 
grass and was just going to 
pounce on one of the goslings 
when the old goose turned 




around and flapped her 
wings right in his face. 

''Boo! boo!" said the goose; 
" away with you ! away with you 
and frightened the fox off into the woods. 

The next morning the old gray goose said to the little goslings, 
"Come, my dears. Let us go down to the brook and swim." 

" Yes, yes," said the yellow and white goslings ; and they all wad- 
dled off together. 

When they came to the brook the old goose jumped in first, and 
the three little goslings followed after — splash ! splash ! splash ! one 
after the other. 

But the old fox was watching them from the bank. 



PLAYING STATION. 



241 



'•Ha ! ha ! " he said to himself. " I spy three little yellow and 
white goosey-goslings. I think I'll catch one for my breakfast." So 
he jumped into the brook, and the little goslings ducked their heads 
into the water and out again, without once looking behind them. 

But the old gray goose was on the watch and she jumped at the fox, 
and flapped her wings in his face. She splashed the water in his 
eyes, and shrieked out at the top of her voice : " Boo ! boo! away with 
you ! away with you !" 

This so frightened the fox that he scrambled up the bank as fast as 
his legs would carry him, ran off into the woods, and never came back 
again. 

The three little goslings went back to live in the barrel, and grew 
up. each of them, to be a big mamma goose, and to have little yellow 



and white goslings of her own. 



E. ANNETTE HILLS. 




PLAYING STATION. 



When Aunt Kate came to make us a visit last spring she brought 
Arthur and James a present of a little hammock. Their papa 
swung it between two trees in the back-yard, and the little boys 
were delighted with it, and took turns swinging each other. 

Every day when it was time for James to take his noon-day nap 



242 



PL A YING S TA TION. 



his nurse put him in the hammock and swung him to sleep. He 
never made a fuss, as was often the case when he was rocked to sleep 
in somebody's arms. 

One afternoon, when the two little boys were in the hammock. 
Aunt Kate came out in the yard. " Let's play station," she said ; 
■' I'll swing you, and you must tell me where you want to go, and 
I'll stop the hammock when we get to the place. Then you must 
pay your car-fare in kisses." 

Arthur said he wanted to go to Washington, and so Aunt Kate 




swung the hammock a few times, and then called out " Washing- 
ton ! " in a loud tone, and said the fare was five dollars. So 
Arthur gave her five kisses, and the hammock began to swing 
again, for James wanted to go to Boston. When Aunt Kate 
called out " Boston ! " James had to pay ten kisses. 

" Now, where do you want to go ? " asked Aunt Kate. 

" I want to go to Mud-top," said Arthur. 

"And I want to go to Dog-house," said James. 

" There is no station on this road named Mud-top, and the train 
never stops at Dog-house," said Aunt Kate, laughing. 

Then the two little boys began to laugh, too, and they laughed 



PL A 1 'IXG S TA riON. 



243 



so hard that when the hammock tipped a little they both fell 
out. 




But they were not hurt, and they liked so much to play sta- 
tion that after that Aunt Kate had to come out in the yard 
every afternoon as long as she stayed. 

FLORENCE B. HALLOWELL. 




SUGARING OFF. 



Connie discovered one morning 

That the sap from the maple trees 

Was dripping where twigs had heen broken, 
And he straightway began to tease. 

Why couldn't he have a kettle, 

Tap a tree, and get it full, 
Then boil it into molasses, 

And have a candy pull ? 

'•Make sugar!" They laughed at his notion. 

" Make sugar in town ! " they cried. 
" You could do it." said Connie, determined ; 

"You could if you only tried." 

The day was beautiful, balmy. 

Although on the lawn still lay 
Great patches of snow that the sunshine 

Had not yet melted away. 




SUGARING OFF. 



246 



SUGARING OFF. 



So a tree was bored with an auger 
To the music of Connie's tongue, 

A tiny trough made, and under 
A little tin bucket hung;. 



Drip, drip, all day until evening 

The great tree's sweet sap run ; 
Drip, drip, till the pail brimmed over ; 

Then the boiling was begun. 

'Twas not outside in a snow-drift, 

As sugar-boiling should be, 
But over the kitchen fire, 

While Bridget got the tea. 

There was just a mere atom of sugar, 

Such a very little bit, 
That nobody else but (Jonnie 

Had even a taste of it. 

CLARA DOTY BATES. 





SENSITIVE PLANTS. 

Some plants do not like to be touched 
at all. There are many ferns that shrink 
up at once if you touch them. The Judas 
tree will do this ; even if an insect flies 
on the leaves they contract, and crush the 
poor creature to death. Under this tree 
you will find all about the ground hundreds of these dead in- 
sects. 

The "Venus fly-trap" has a sweet, sticky juice, which they like. 
The moment they touch it, to sip this juice, the little petals con- 
tract. They put the poor things in prison, and they have to die. 
The odor of the nutmeg the cook uses to flavor your cakes and 
pies is so strong that birds that live about the nutmeg groves 
are made tipsy. They fall to the ground, not able to move. The 
ants that abound in that country come and eat their legs off, and 
leave them to die a most cruel death. 

MRS. G. HALL. 




THE LITTLE DAIRY-MAID. 

Brigiit little Betty, 

Blithesome and pretty. 
Lightly she trips thro' the sweet-scented clover. 

Rosy cheeks, rub}' lips. 

Dainty shaped finger tips, 
Sweet little mouth as one e'er could discover. 

Lithely she skips along. 

Trillins; her carol sono-. 
Calling the kine from the mead o'er the water ; 

Loving and dutiful. 

Modest and beautiful, 
She is a dairy-man's dear little daughter. 



Trim little dairy-maid. 

Mother's own merry maid. 
Scarcely she knows she is winsome and pretty ; 

Who would not be as she. 

Willingly, cheerily. 
Loving and helping all — sweet little Betty? 

ROBERT OGDEN FOWLER. 




^j^ittlepairy/y^icL 




BETTY'S PLAYTHINGS. 

HIS summer Aunt Nancy went to a farm 
where she lived when a little girl. At 
this place were some aged people and 
their great-granddaughter, who was 
only five years old. Her name was 
Betty. She had no playmates, or no 
such playthings as city children have. 
One day Aunt Nancy sat by the 
window and heard Betty say, " Now. 
little chicken, you must lay an egg."' 
Looking out, Aunt Nancy saw that she 
had a piece of glass propped up in an 
old birds' nest. Pretty soon Betty said, 
" There, little chicken, you did lay 
ggs." Then she took three small bits 
of glass from the nest, and seemed as pleased as 
if they were truly eggs. 
Aunt Nancy remembered that she had a number of " Our Little 

Ones " in her valise. She got it, and read to Betty about " Pauline's 

Strange Pets." Betty thought it very funny 

to dress the toads up so, but said she couldn't 

do that, for she had always been afraid of 

toads. 

But one day Aunt Nancy met her in the 

lane, with a wheel -barrow, in which she 

had a little pig, dressed in a long white 

baby dress. Around its neck was one of 

Betty's white raffles, and on its head a 

wreath of golden-rod and red honeysuckle. 

Piggy didn't like the arrangement at all. 

He kept squirming and grunting, but Betty 

had tied him in with an old sash-ribbon. She wheeled him up and 

down the lane for quite a while. When Aunt Nancy went back to 

her city home she bought a lovely doll and doll-carriage, and sent 

them, by express, to Betty. The little girl wrote a letter to her, 




BETTY'S PLAYTHINGS. 



251 




printed with a lead-pencil. The most important sentences were 
these: I. LIKE. MY. DOLL. AND. CARRIAGE.— THE. PIG. IS. 
DEAD. — COME. DOWN. NEXT. SUMMER. 

VIRGINIA C. HOLL1S. 




BUILDING THE NEST. 

" Little Mrs. Robin, let me help, I pray ; 
Will you have a withered leaf, or a wisp of hay ? 

" Here are softest mosses, grasses dry and brown, 
Shreds of lace and feathers, bits of silk}' down. 

"Tell me, Mrs. Robin, what I first shall bring, 
Shall it be a mossy twig, or a bit of string ? " 

" Wait, my little maiden, by the garden-wall. 
Where the warmest sunbeams always seem to fall. 

"I must build so nicely, I can hardly tell; 
All the things you mention answer very well. 



" But if I could choose the best," so the robin said. 
"It would be some yellow curls from your pretty head." 

ELIZABETH A. DAVIS. 




BUILDING THE NEST. 




Frank lay on the wolf-rug, restlessly kicking his 
feet on the carpet. He was watching Ruth assort 
the pitcher full of wild-flowers she had just brought 
from the woods. 

He had not yet quite gotten over the disappoint- 
ment of losing his ride with the rest. When they 
were all ready to start he was nowhere to be found. 
" Don't you want one of these purple spearmint spikes, 
Frank?" said Ruth. 
" Don't care a bit for spearmints." 

" Well, I know you would like this gentian. Such a pretty blue. 
— like somebody's eyes ! " 

" Tain't the fringy kind ; don't want it when it ain't fringy. 
Ruth was smiling under her broad sun-hat. She was glad Frank 
could not see it. She knew how hard it was for a bright, sweet little 
boy to lose his temper and be in the mood Frank now was. 

Pretty soon, as she was disentangling something that looked like a 
fine cord of gold from one of her long flower-stems, she saw Frank's 
blue eyes furtively watching. A happy thought struck her. Taking 
up her flower-scissors, she snipped off the flower and leaves from one 
long straight stem, leaving the cord. It was twisted curiously about 
one end, and trailing down by itself, like a whip-lash. " Here, Frank, 
here is a dodder-whip for you." 

It was too great a temptation. Slowly he got up from the rug, 
and edged along till he could reach the green whip-handle held out 
to him. 



THE DODDER- WHIP. 



255 



" I didn't know it was dodder, and I didn't know dodder made 
whips." 

" It does, though, if you cut it right. You can snap that at a fly. 
and you'll find out." 




"How did you twist the lash on so tight and even? Just two 
twists, and ' edzactly ' even." 

" They twist themselves, Frank. You may have the whip, but I 
want to show you some more of this dodder. Here is one of my 
large yellow flowers. Look at the stem. It is all wound round and 
round with this pretty gold cord. It is kinked and curled in rings 



256 



THE DODDER-WHIP. 



and knots as tightly as I could have wound it, and more gracefully 
done." 

" What's those white flowers' little cups all in a bunch ? I didn't 
know dodder had blossoms." 

" Yes, indeed, blossoms, but not leaves. See, they look like wax 
bells. How pretty the white ball buds are ! I like everything about 
the dodder but just one thing." 

" What is that ? " 

" Do 3'ou see these leaves of my yellow flower ? How they are 
curled and bent up tight towards the stem ? Well, the dodder does 
that. When it first started to grow it had a root of its own ; but 
pretty soon it thought it could just as well live on the yellow- 
flowered plant as by it. So it sent out little tiny roots, and drew its 
own life from the plant it clung to. The better it grew, the worse 
the plant looked. It often kills the plant, and goes on growing and 
curling and blossoming without caring at all about the poor, wither- 
ing plant." 

"I think it's awful selfish, but I like my dodder-whip for all that," 
and Frank went off in search of flies. He pretended they were 
Tom, the driver, who didn't hunt him up when they went to drive, 
and used it in such vigorous efforts as to quite spoil the golden lash." 

JULIA P. BALLARD. 




A Bolted Door 

May keep out tramps and burglars, but 
not Asthma, Bronchitis, Colds, Coughs, 
and Croup. The best protection against 
these unwelcome intruders is Ayer's 
Cherry Pectoral. With a bottle of this 
far-famed preparation at hand, Throat 
and Lung Troubles may be checked and 
serious Disease averted. 

Thomas G. Edwards, M. D., Blanco, 
Texas, certifies : " Of the many prepa- 
rations before the public for the cure of 
colds, coughs, bronchitis, and kindred 
diseases, there are none, within the 
range of my experience and observation, 
so reliable as Ayer's Cherry Pectoral." 

John Meyer, Florence, W. Va., says : 
" I have used all your medicines, and 
keep them constantly in my house. I 
think Ayer's Cherry Pectoral saved my 
life some years ago." 

D. M. Bryant, M. D., Chicopee Falls, 
Mass., writes : " Ayer's Cherry Pectoral 
has proved remarkably good in croup, 
ordinary colds, and whooping cough, 
and is invaluable as a family medicine." 



Ayer's Cherry Pectoral, 

PREPARED BY 

Dr. J. C. Ayer & Co., Lowell, Mass. 

Sold by all Druggists. Price $1 ; six bottles, $5. 




'PEN6ERIAN 
»TEEL PENS 

Are the Best. 



in the essential qualities of Durability, 
Evenness of Points and Workman- 
ship. Sample card containing five leading 
styles of Pens sent for trial, on receipt of re- 
turn postage, 2 cents. Ask for card No. 9. 

man, blakeman & co„ 



753 & 755 Broadway, 



New York. 



ROSES 

ALL THE YEAR ROUND. 

Now that the roses are coming, every lady 
will want to make her own 

POT-POURRI. 

We have elegant jars of our own impor- 
tation at 50 cts. and 75 cts., which we will send 
by mail. Postage and packing 15 cts. extra. 
Larger jars at $1., 1.25, $1.50 and upwards, 
sent by express at expense of purchaser. 

RECIPE IX EVERT JAK. 



JAP^PAIR 



Brilliant Colors, 
I O cts. 

Silvered or Gilt, 
25 Cts. 



May be used as mats or for making fancy 
articles. Much used at dessert, and on eve- 
ning and lawn-party refreshment tables. Gen- 
uine importations. Sent by mail. 

Japanese Importing Co., 

Lock Box, 1825, BOSTON, MASS. 



Best the Cheapest ! 

Corticelli Wash Silk, 




Prepared expressly for Art-needlework on materials which 
require washing. 

Colors warranted not to " run " or to injure in any way the 
most delicate fabrics by using castile soap and warm water. 

Sold in three grades: (1) EE, coarse, for extra heavy outline 
work or solid embroidery. Ten yard skeins ; (2) No. 600, 
medium for ordinary outline work or etching. Ten yard 
skeins; (3) Floss, (sometimes called Filo-floss) a fine size of 
high lustre, sold only on spools owing to its slack twist and 
consequent delicacy. 

Send 6 cts. in stamps for sample, stating grade desired. 



J 

18 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON. 

(SOLE MANUFACTURERS.) 



w 



ANTED. 



Everybody to try our 

Magnificent Collec- 

plants for $1.00. Illus- 



tion of 20 
trated Circular FREE. 

F. E. FASSETT & BRO., 

ASHTABULA, OHIO. 



INK 



BLACK J VIOLET 



PINK 



RED 



CREEN 



You can make; it yourself without the slightest trouble, nnrt nta 
savins of 200 per cent, with WALPOLK INK POWDERS, 
which will yield several quarts of the beat Ink in the world. 
Package of either color 2.1 cents. Liberal discount in large pack- 
ages to" parties desiring to make Ink for sale. Used extensively by 
Schools, Banks, Merchants, and Blank Book Manufacturers. Pull 
information by circular, free by mail. Address. 
WALPOLE DYE AND CHEMICAL COMPANY, 
■ 19 Milk 8t., Boston, Mass.. U. S. A. 



Hi 



X 



PEERLESS DYES 



Are tbe BEST. 

Sold by Druggists. 



THE DINGEE & CONAKI> CO'S 
LEADING SPECIALTIES. 

ROSES 

ALL VARIETIES, SIZES AND PRICES 
FINE EVER-BLOOMING PERPETUAL, 

CLIMBING AND MOSS ROSES. 

NEW AND RARE FLOWER SEEDS. 

HARDY PLANTS, "ew Moon Flower, Clematis, Spring Bulbs, 

JAPAN LILIES, Hew Chrysanthemums, and our Wonderful 

ORNAMENTAL VEGETABLES. «•"»" ) ' safely 

by mall or express '» »« psinis. We otrer Choice NEW 

THINCS »nd STERLINC NOVELTIES 1» »" departments. 

Our NEW GUIDE, l* 1 panes, elegantly illustrated, describes over 

1500 NEWEST and CHOICEST Varieties of ROSES, 
SEEDS, PLANTS and BULBS, end tells how to grow 
them Free. B^~ If you wish to plant anything, send ior it 

20 Years Established. Over 00 Large Greaithouaa. 

THE DINCEE & CONARD CO. 

KOSE GBOWBES, WEST GKOVE, CHESTEE CO., PA. 



INDIAN MOCCASINS 



rj»ROM the "Red Men " of the Wild West, made 
■*• from genuine smoked tanned buckskin, beautifully 
ornamented in various colored bead work patterns 
by the Indian squaws of the different tribes in the 
Rocky Mountains, showing the artistic handiwork of the 
untutored savage." It takes several days of patient 
labor to make one pair. They are valuable as curiosi- 
ties and relics of a fast disappearing race, are also the 
lightest, warmest, softest, stillest foot covering on earth, 
and never blister the feet on long journeys. Comfort- 
able for tired feet and invalids, noiseless for the sick 
room and other house wear. Being useful as well as 
pretty and unique, they are very acceptable presents to 
friends. Every tourist, camper, pleasure-seeker and hun- 
ter should have them. While hunting all kinds of game, 
" the moccasined foot treads the forest as though shod 
with silence." Wholesale terms liberal to persons buy. 
ing to sell again, also to publishers wishing to use them 
as premiums. 

Price per pair, for ladies or gents, postpaid, - - $2.00 

" " children's sizes, 1.50 

" " baby's or infant's sizes, called 

" papoose " sizes, 1.00 

Address, 

G. G. MEAD, Ferris, Wyoming. 



CARNRIGKS^roiJD 



Perfectly nourishes the child from birth, without the addition of cow's milk, 
and digests as easily as human milk. Send for "Our Baby's First and Second 
Years," by Marion Harland, REED &. CARNRICK, New York. 




NIVERSIT Y O R C A N SL- 

They Lead the 'World.— *S5 to *500. 
Sold litest to FimiiUs. No Middlemen. 

Solid "Walnut-r.Octavcs-Double Couplers. 

Guaranteed for Six Years and sent, *AS 
with Stool and Book, for trial in your ftftf 
Own Home before tou buy. Fktarlished 
1859. DIARCHAL & SMITH, 

2S& East 31st Street. Heir York. 



u 



CMCDCHM r 'EVERY PIANO 

^U.'n.C ; l\OUn-'' F M L ^'.,W' ARR ' A NTED. 



SEN b I TO R £AT-A L0 G U E. -' . h I 1 IJ fl 

;EMERSON, PIANO C0.| I I AMU 
' J ' : ^AR*E ROOMS, l,4bA.TR£M0NT.$T. 
ap<"- -:-v U'flOSCTON""- MAS 5 ■ 



^iiiste 



192 Pages; $4 Colored. Maps; 60 Colored Diagrams. Contains 
complete Map of every State, Territory, and Country in 
the world, and statistical tables, etc. Flexible covers, gold 
side stamp and red edges. A marvel of cheapness. Sent, post 
paid, to any address for 35 cts. 5 copies for $1, Postage 
stamps taken. 

E. B. GOODNOW & CO., 
Box 1687, BOSTON, MASS. 



rcERLcSS DTES sold bt druggists'. 



/, Habla V. Espanol ? 
Parlcz-Vous Franrais? 
Sprfchen Sie Pentsch? 
Pariate Italiano? 



I2fl" TIBIST T77". 



IECS 



You can, at your o^n home, by 

Dr. RICHARD S. ROSENTHAL'S MEISTERSCHAFT SYSTEM, 

learn to speak fluently either Spanish, French, Italian or German. 
Speclman Copy, Spanish, French, Ge man, or Italian, 25 Cents. 

All subscribers — $5.00 for each language — become actual pupils of Dr. Rosenthal, 
■who corrects all exercises, and corresponds with them in regard to any difficulties 
which may occur. 



MEISTERSCHAFT PUBLISHING CO., Herald Building, Boston, Mass. 



( "trainers 

(ombound 

For The Nervous 
The Debilitated 
The Aged 




I ORES Nervous Prostration, NervousHead- 
■ ache, Neuralgia, NervousWeakness, 
^Stomach and Liver Diseases, and all 
affections of the Kidneys. 
AS A NERVE TONIC, It Strengthens 
and Quiets the Nerves. 

AS AN ALTERATIVE, It Purines and 
Enriches the Blood. 

AS A LAXATIVE, It acts mildly, but 
surely, on the Bowels. 

AS A DIURETIC, It Regulates the Kid- 
neys and Cures their Diseases. 
Recommended by professional and businessmen. 
Price $1.00. Sold by druggists. Send for circulars. 

WELLS, RICHARDSON & CO., Proprietors. 
BURLINGTON, VT. 




Its superior excellence proven in millions of homes for 
more than a quarter of a century. It is used by tbe United 
States Government. Endorsed by the heads of tbe Great 
Universities as the Strongest, Purest, and most Healthful. 
Dr. Price's the only Baking Powder that does not contain 
Ammonia, Lime, or Alum. Sold only in Cans. 

PRICE BAKING POWDER CO., 

NEW YORK. CHICAGO. ST. LOUIS. 



BOSTON BUREAU OF ADVERTISING, 




36 BROMFIELD ST., Boston, Mass. 



Magazine, 

Newspaper and 
Specialty Advertising. 

Advertisements inserted in any 
publication at publishers lowest 
rates. 

Special attention given to the 
preparation and. illustration of ad- 
vertisements. 



Exclusive Advertising Agents for 

"Our Little Ones and The Nursery," 

Bound volumes" CHATTERBOX," 



and other 
publications. 



Special Agents for 

SCRIBNER'S MAGAZINE, 

"HOUSEHOLD," " COTTAGE HEARTH," 

" BABYHOOD," AND 

"GOOD HOUSEKEEPING." 

Correspondence solicited and estimates furnished for any 
desired line of advertising, 

GEORGE A. FOXCROFT, 

Manager, 



D®RKEE"S 



GAUNTLET BRAND 




SPICES 
* MUSTARD. 

SOLD ONir IN FULL WEIOHT SEALED PACKAGES. 

Guaranteed absolutely pure, and warranted to excel 
all others in strength, richness, flavor and cleanliness. 



DURKEE'S 



SALflDDHESSIHG 

UNEQUALLED FOR 
EXCELLENCE 

Without a rival as a dressing for all Salads, and as a 
sauce for Cold Meats, etc. It is prepared with extreme 
care ; all its ingredients are of the purest and bat; 
and will keep good for years. 

BEWARE OF ALL IMITATIONS 




X \ 

THE JOY OF THE WORKER. 

Oscar Wilde and the /Esthetic School say that all work should be so done as to give joy to the worker. 
The artist Joseph Bail, from whose fine painting in the Paris Salon of 18S7 our picture is copied, has admirably 
depicted the pleasure which even a scullery boy feels in his work — when it is well done. This "joy of the 
worker" can be easily secured by those who are doing any kind of house-cleaning, if they will only use SAPOLIO. 




I 



JNIYERSITUMOS, 
FROM $180 TO $1500. 
FINEST PIANOS IN THE WORLD. I 

f SOLD DIRECT TO FAMILIES,saving 
the enormous expenses of agents.' 
Sent with beautiful cover, stool 
and book, for trial in yon r own 
home beforeyoubuy.Guaranteed 
euc years. Send for catalogue to 
klarehnl As Smith Piano Co., 285 E. Slst St., N T. 




OYS 



Now's your time to get up clubs 
for our celebrated f/oods and pro- 
cure a Beautiful Watch — 
fctem Winder and Stem 

*etter — Imported Swiss Move- 
ment. Just the watch for boys. We have in stock a 
large line of premiums for all. For full particulars 
address The Grea" American Tea Co. 
P. O. Box 289. 31 & 33 Vesey St., New York, N. Y. 




GOLD MEDAL, PARIS, 1878. 

BAKER'S 



Warranted absolutely puro 
Cocoa, from -which the excess of 
Oil has been removed. It has three 
times the strength of Cocoa mixed 
with Btarch, Arrowroot or Sugar, 
and is therefore far more economi- 
cal, costing less than one cent a 
cup. It is delicious, nourishing, 
strengthening, easily digested, and 
admirably adapted for invalids as 
well as for persons in health. 
Sold by Grocers eve rywhere. 

BAKER & CO., Dorchester, Mass, 




HEALTHY 

CHILDREN 

WEAR THE 

PERFECT-FITTING 



good sense 

CORDED CORSET WAISTS 

so B k° LEADING RETAILERS 

Everywhere. $W~Be sure your corset is 
stamped "GOOD SENSE." Take 
no other. Send for descriptive circular. 

FERRIS BROS. Manufacturers, 
341 Broadway. NEW YORK. 



PEERLESS DYES 



Are the l't>T. 

SOU) BY DltUUGiSTS. 



JOSEPH CI LLOTTS 

STEEL PENS 

Sold By ALL DEALERSThroughoutThe WO RLD 
GOLD MEDAL PARIS EXP0SITI0N-I87B. 



CHDY 



Send $1, $2, $3, or $5 for a retail 
box by express of the best candies 
In America, put up elegantly, and 
striotly pure. Suitable for presents. 
Refers to all Chicago. Address 

GUNTHER, Confectioner, 212 State St., Chicago. 




MATCHLESS for the G0MPUEXI0N: 



*& &* 



A Business Talk. 



TO THOSE MOST CONCERNED. 

There is a current notion that a man cannot talk " business " with a woman. But that depends 
— partly on the woman, more on the man, most on the business. It is no special credit to a man or 
discredit to a woman that the former grasps the essence of things he has been familiar with front 
boyhood, and that the latter is t ■ II V ••■■; ^rantof what she has been sedulously kept frorrl knowing any- 
thing about. It is not every man \\ . iear enough head to make a subject intelligible to those 
who hear it from him for the first time. t, 're is a difference between the minutice of a special 
branch and the great broad principles thai t -'*/ business. 

A business talk like that we propose to gi. I -quire any special business training, but just 

ordinary "horse sense " — and women have pleiu_ i ?.. '.espite the sneers of paragraphers. Any 
one who watches them at work in lines for which tt.ch Aing and aptitudes fit them — housekeep- 
ing, shopping, operating in the matrimonial market — and sees the cold, hard, calculating sense many 
■ if them apply to the business in hand, will not easily believe that they cannot or will not apply their 
minds to a matter so vital to their interests as life insurance. 

We address the sex in general, then — experienced married women, young brides, girls who 
hear in fancy the chime of their own wedding-bells in the distance — as follows : 

The thing you need most in your lovely and comfortable homes is something that will make you 
sure of keeping them as near as may be in equal loveliness and comfort under any circumstances, 
isn't it? Now, if your husband dies and leaves nothing (as numbers do right along who have cut 
quite a swell during their lives ), you won't be very likely to do it. You know you can't run a very 
epicurean household by decorating pottery or making shirts; you will not be painfully flush of 
theatre tickets or even car tickets, and you will not buy the children a great many ponies or bicycles, 
nor send them to college when they grow up. A good many of you will be worse off than that, and 
dresses will be turned more than once, and gloves worn very shabby, and the boys will be hurried 
into shops and offices before they are out of roundabouts, and the girls — well, they will put a ejeat 
deal more material into the waists of their dresses than if they had a little more money. 

Now, suppose your husband puts a nice little fortune where he can't get it and yon can, or where 
you can both have it when it is likely to be needed most? Then you needn't worry; you will not 
fall nearly so far nor so hard. You can still keep a nice home, give the boys a start on a supe- 
rior career, and the girls a chance anyway to go where the best young men will see them and feel 
their knees begin to tremble. Well, he can do it with perfect case. THE Travelers INSURANCE 
Co., of Hartford, makes a business of enabling men to do that very thing at the lowest possible 
rates and with absolute security. If he just wants a policy that will keep you from want or drudgery, 
he can get it for a sum that a hod-carrier would hardly miss; if he wants one to mature when his 
brood will need it, they practically give him the insurance and pay him 4 per cent, compound interest 
on his premium money for the privilege of having the money to invest. He can't a^k Utter terms 
than that, can he ? And is he doing his decent duty byj'OM if he doesn't take one or the other sort ? 

And one thing more : Don't you let him fool away his cash on concerns that have no money 
and bind themselves never to have any, and can't pay you a cent till they have passed around the hat 
and got it from a lot of other people, and are in consequence always liable to be broken up by the 
first heavy loss, and which pay on the average less than zo cents on the dollar. You had better have 
no policy than one that you can't rely on, and which leaves you an anxious heart and will probably leave 
you a pauper. Don't'let him be gulled by talk about " cheapness " — a thing you can't get after you 
have paid for it isn't cheap at half a cent. The Travki.krs could pay a $500,000 loss in one day, 
and a loss of ami/lion and a half of dollars in a few days, without closing its doors. It has lived 
nearly a quarter of a century, and has paid back to its policy-holders close on fifteen millions of dollars. 

" Moral : Insure in the Travelers." 



♦fr 



-<* 




Copyright. 188S. by EnssBLl/3 .ismnq Company.! (Entered at the P O at Bostou as second-class matter. 



CONTENTS. 



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A 
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PS 

10 



THE FOURTH OF JULY A. S. Cox 

(Illustrated by the Author.) 

FRESHENING FISH Florbnce B. Hallowbll 

(Illustrated by L. D. Norton.) 

TO BE SUNNY A ' B 

(Illustrated by A. Brennan.) 

WHAT LADY IS SHE George Cooper .... 

(Illustrated by H. P. Barnes.) 

THE FIRE-CRACKER M. A. Haley ...... 

(Illustrated-by H. Winthrop Pierce.) 

.... L. 13. C 



B OO 



Ji a 

o2 



I*- 
# 



JULY 



PAGE 

259 

. 260 

. 263 

. 264 

. 265 

268 



(Illustrated by Lizbeth B. Comins.) 



LUCY'S NEW SHOES 

(Illustrated by Miss V. D. Prentiss.) 



SHEP'S CELEBRATION 

(Illustrated by H. M. Beal.) 

FOUR LITTLE BOBOLINKS 

(Illustrated by Parker Hayden.) 

THE FLAMINGO ....... 

(Illustrated by Carl Hirschberg.) 

FRANKIE'S LETTER. BELLE BURIED IN THE SAND 

(Illustrated by Jessie McDermot..) „ „,_, 

THE CRICKET AND THE WORMS ..... Mrs. G. Hall -79 

(Illustrated by H. P: _Barnes., ARK ^ May S HERWOOD . - . 280 



Katie Kyle 

E. L. V • 

Amanda M. Douglas . . 

Mrs. G. Hall 

Frankie 



269 

271 
274 
277 
278 



HOW TOT WENT TO TH 

(Illustrated by H. P. Barnes.) T TTr.c«w 

THE PANSIE'S SECRET J*™ *»■ J UDS0N ' 

T „r ( nnT edbyH ' P ' Bra&) Christine Stevens 

TENTING OUT ■ • ■ 

(Illustrated by H. W. Tucker.) 

SUMMER S S e>»^™^^A:N^y 

A CHICKEN WITH A WOODEN LEG . 

(Illustrated by Parker Hayden.) 



Aunt Estelle 



282 

283 
28s 

2S6 



The Illustrative Department under the d irection of Mr. G eorge T. Andrew. 

■oijRlJrrTTrONE^AND THE NURSERY, 



(MONTHL Y. 
TERMS (in advance). 



One Year ... 
Sixteen Months 



Two Copies, one year 
Three Copies, 



$1.50. 
2.00. 

CLUB 

$2.80. 
4.00. 



Eight Months $1.00 

Single Copies . . 15 cents. 



RATES. 

Four Copies, one year 
Five Copies, 



$5.00^ 
6.00. 



russell publishingj^o*^^ 

" fineTcomplexion, smooth, soft skin. 

sMillill 



NEW SUMMER BOOKS 

'-oo Dsocim . Bn i.,^ rect Thing 

a ready sa]e as } ts conciseness will re~ 7- E C0ER ECT thing " to do that t„ -u d ° , th,s ' "Me per contr'a 
prehens.ve manual. W1 " rec °mmend it to many who would not take f /'. will t undoubtedly meet with 

* * r- . j- ■ tlme t0 master any more com 

%* First edition exhausted before tuMi^r , 

"^republication, second edition now on the press 

*v r „„«„ owlII „ L , Social Customs. 
-i^f^a's ^j** 611 Companion. 

"'^^tS-S^*"— — tePi „ 

«„„„!.,« Camp Cookery. 

FlrSt » L c°Tii S . Best - I ^ From the Cape. 

"A FASCINATING LOVE STORY" Illustrated. 

. ______^^J^"BRIGHT, BREEZY AND CLEVER » 

Estes & Lauriat, 299-305 Washington St., Boston. 



n 



Painting Outfit for Our Little Ones Free!! 

How to Learn to Draw and Paint in Water 
Colors without a Teacher. 




The foundation of this system, of instruction which is 
amusing as well as instructive, is a little book entitled 

"Introductory Lessons in Drawing and Painting in 

Water Colors," 

which explains everything which is necessary to be done for 
one to learn that is, one is told how to do it and he must prac- 
tice unti he can do it. The book is the instructor and praeu* 
the teacher If one wishes to take lessons from a teacher, this 
took wiU prepare him the better for so doing. Every one m 
beg nning to paint in water colors puts the colors on in patches 
streaks and daubs. This book shows how all that may be 
avoided, and bow a flat even tint can be obtained. 
Price, 50 cents, postage paid. 





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IMPERIAL GRANUM, W. C. Wile, M. D., in the New England Medical Monthly, January, 
CJ 1888 — "In the delicate conditions of the stomach, when every thing else has been rejected 
3 I have saved many lives by giving Imperial Granum. I consider this as one of the very 
best foods the physician can find to assist him in carrying through his patient to recovery; and I 
have found it of inestimable value in the later stages of Phthisis, Gastritis, Gastric Catarrh, 
Dyspepsia and Dysentery. It requires little effort of the stomach to digest and I have never 
known it to be rejected if properly prepared, given in small quantities and at frequent intervals. 
The great care used in its manufacture will lead the physician to expect the same product all the 
time, and we can assure him that he will never be disappointed, as we have fully tested it in our 
extended experience." 

"We speak from experience when we say that the Imperial Granum is both safe and 
nutritions. It has been on the market for many years, and the largely increasing sales show that 
many others havo found like results attending its use. — The Christian Union, N. T. 

As a Medicinal Pood Imperial Granum, which is simply a solid extract from very superior 
growths of wheat, is unexcelled. It is easy of digestion, is not constipating, and is to-day the 
Standard Dietetic preparation for invalids, for the aged, and for the very young. — North 
American Journal of Homoeopathy, N. T., Dec, '87. 

Imperial Granum has now been before the public for many years, and is generally admitted 
to be a standard preparation. There can be no doubt that this is due to its uniformly superior 
quality, and the successful results obtained with it in all cases where an artificial food is 
required. — Popular Science News, Boston, February, '88. 

" Imperial Granum. — A neighbor's child being very low, reduced, in fact, to a mere baby 
skeleton from want of nourishment, as nothing could be found which the child could retain, at the 
urgent request of friends the parents were induced to try Imperial Granum, which proved such a 
benefit to the child it grew and thrived beyond all comprehension. At the same time I had a child 
sick with cholera infantum ; on being presented with a box of Granum, with the high recommend 
from this neighbor, used it and continued its use to raise the child on, and I firmly believe this had 
all to do in saving the former child's life and the greater part in restoring my own child to health. 
A. C. G." — Leonard's Illustrated Medical Journal, Detroit, Mich., Oct., 'ST. 

P. Varnum Mott, M. D., Boston, Mass., in the Microcosm, New Tork, February, 1886. — 
" There are numerous Foods that are much vaunted, and all have their adherents. The ' Imperial 
Granum,' in my hands, seems to be all that is claimed for it, and experience has brought me to 
rely on its use where its special properties are indicated. In infantile diseases it has proved very 
efficacious, and I always direct its use when a child is being weaned." 

The lives of untold thousands of infants have been saved by Imperial Granum, and careful 
mothers aro loud in their praises of this well known food, and pharmacists can safely recommend 
it. — Proceedings Illinois Pharmaceutal Association, 1887. 

" On some other Planet there may be a better Dietetic Preparation than Imperial Granum, 
but not on this." — " The American Analyst," New York. 



SOLD BY DRUGGISTS. 



JOHN CARLE & SONS, New York- 




1SS8 

Copyright, 1888, by Russell Publishing Company. 



No. 9. 



THE FOURTH OF JULY. 



Quack ! Quack ! Quack ! Kut, Kut, Kurdee ! Ducks quacking, 
hens cackling, geese screaming, and all running in every di- 
rection. 

Whew ! what a dust ! What can be the matter ? Don't you hear 
the rattle of the wheels ? 

It is the cavalry coming. Cavalry, you know, means soldiers on 
horseback ; but this time they ride velocipedes instead. 

Who wonders tha,t the poultry are afraid ? 

Rattle, rattle, the wheels ! Toot, toot, the horns ! Snappity bang ! 
go the fire-crackers, and above all come the shouts of those brave 
soldiers. 

"Why do they make such a noise! " you ask. 

Can't you think ? Yes, to be sure ; it is the glorious Fourth of 
July ! One hundred and twelve years ago to-day our great-great- 
grandfathers said they would make a country of their own. They 
would call it the United States, and not be ruled any longer by 
other men in England, a country away across the sea. 

In memory of this event people living in the United States show 
how glad they are for their grandfathers and themselves by making 



260 



FRESHENING FISH. 



a very loud noise, every year when this day arrives. The boy in 
front, with the big fur hat, is the son of an artist, who has many 
queer hats and clothes ; that is where they got those funny things 
to dress up in. 

Isn't it a strange army ? Every one is a great general, not one 
private soldier ! 

First, there comes the boy who calls himself General Sheridan, 
and next to him is General George Washington. Then General 
Grant comes, with so many more behind that I can't remember 
their names. Oh, what a beautiful day this Fourth of July is, and 



how we all long for it to come again ! 



a. s. cox. 




Last summer, when Susie and her mother were in the country, 
her father used to come every Friday to stay until Monday. One 
Saturday morning, as soon as breakfast was over, he and Susie 
started on a fishing excursion. 

Susie carried the minnow pail, and over one shoulder was a rod 
her father had brought her. She looked very proud and happy. 

" You needn't buy any meat for dinner, mamma," she said, " for 
papa and I will bring plenty of fish." 

" Very well," said her mother. " I won't stop the butcher's wagon 
when it comes by. We will have a fish dinner." 



FRESHENING FISH. 



261 



When the river was reached Mr. Dean baited Susie's hook, and in 
less than five minutes she caught a fat cat-fish. Then her papa 
caught a bass, and by eleven o'clock they had nearly twenty fish 
strung on a willow switch, which Mr. Dean had cut for the pur- 
pose. 

Susie was tired sitting still so long, and, throwing down her 
rod, said she would " freshen " up the 

fish by holding 

them in the 

water. 




" I am 

afraid you will let 

them go," said her papa. 

But Susie was sure there was no danger of that ; and she had fine 
fun dipping the string of fish in a little j)ool by a big rock. 

All at once she gave a loud cry. 

" papa, they're gone," she said. " I didn't mean to let them go. 
Oh, I'm so sorry I came ! I wish I had stayed at home ; " and she 
burst into tears. 

Her father poked around the rock with a pole for a long time, 
but could not find the fish, and at last he and Susie went 
home. 



262 



FRESHENING FISH. 



Mrs. Dean laughed when she heard about the loss of the fish. She 
said she would fry some eggs, which must take the place of the meat 




she would have bought but for Susie's promise to bring home plenty 
of fish. 

And the next time Susie went fishing she did not ask to be allowed 
to " freshen " the fish at all. 

FLORENCE B. HALI.OWELE. 




Did you see a little lady 

Pass you by without a bonnet, 

In a robe of crimson satin, 

With some pretty dots upon it ? 

All the day she haunts the garden, 
'Mid the roses, pinks, and lilies. 

Under cooling; leaves she loiters, 
When the drowsy noon so still is. 



Then, on busy cpiest, she hurries 
Till the dewy twilight closes ; 

Bees may hum, and birds may carol, — 
She's as cpiiet as the roses. 



THE FIRE-CRACKER. 265 

Other ladies have their mansions; 

But a lily's lighted chalice 
Is a lovely home to live in, — 

That's my Lady Bug's own palace. 

GEORGE COOPER. 




THE FIRE-CRACKER. 



It was the first Fourth of July that Bertie could remember. 
His mother gave him a box of torpedoes, and told him he might 
sit on the front steps and amuse himself with them. 

Bertie thought this was great fun for a while. Then he became 
interested in some boys in the street who were throwing down 
something different from torpedoes. 

He went into the house, and asked his mother if he might have 
some fire-works such as the boys had. 

" No," said his mamma. " My little boy is not old enough to 
play with fire-crackers." 

" Oh, please, mamma, let me have some ! I will be very care- 
ful," said Bertie. 

His mamma told him he must be contented with torpedoes, and 
if the boys offered him any fire-crackers he must refuse them 
politely. 




THE FIRE-CRACKER. 



THE FIRE-CRACKER. 267 

Bertie went out on the steps again, feeling very unhappy, and 
wondering how his dear mother could be so cruel to her little 
boy. 

By and by a boy passed quite near Bertie. He lighted his fire- 
cracker and threw it at the foot of the steps. It did not fizz and 
explode as the others did, and Bertie went down to look at it. 

Just at this moment his mother called him. He felt that he 
must keep this one fire-cracker, so he thrust it into the pocket of 
his linen dress. 

He heard his mamma call him again. He ran into the house ; 
but instead of going to her side, as he always did, he crowded into 
the farther corner of the window. 

How hot the fire-cracker seemed ! He put his hand slyly into 
his pocket, then screamed, and threw himself into his mother's 
arms. His dress was on fire. 

Mamma caught the burning skirt in both hands, and wrapped 
the woollen curtain around it and held it till the fire was extin- 
guished. Her hands were severely burned as well as Bertie's. 

Whenever afterwards Bertie was tempted to do wrong he would 
think of the scars on his mother's hands, and say to himself, " My 
dear mother has suffered so much for me already, I must not do 
anything more to give her pain." 

M. A. HALEY. 




w 



6UKY 



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T^W I 

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W|k> fi°AtS 

13 / I/O 




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LUCY'S NEW SHOES. 



One day Lucy's papa brought her home a beautiful pair of new 
shoes, with patent-leather tips that shone so brightly Lucy could 
almost see her face in them. 

Lucy was very proud of them. She put them on and tip-toed 
all around the room. While she was admiring them in this way, her 
mamma said, " Lucy, if you go out to play put on your old shoes." 

"Yes'm," replied Lucy, and she 
really meant to ; but her brother 
Harry called her to come to 
the brook with him to 
sail his boat. She for- 
got about her shoes 
till something dread- 
ful happened! 

When they reached 
the brook Harry wanted 
to cross to the other 
side, where it was shady. 
He found some stones, 
which he placed in the 
water for him and Lucy to 
step on. Harry skipped 
over, and Lucy was follow- 
ing, when slip went one of 
the stones, and splash went 
Lucy into the water ! / 

" Harry, I've ruined my new 
shoes ! " cried Lucy, — " my beautiful new shoes ! 
of the water, she sat upon the bank and cried. 

" It's all my fault," said Harry ; " I ought to have helped you 
across." 

" No, it's my fault," said Lucy ; " I ought to have remembered 
what mamma told me." 

Lucy went up to the house and told her mamma her trouble. 
Her mamma didn't scold her, but she said, "I'm very sorry my 




And coming out 



270 



LUCY'S NEW SHOES. 




little girl's memory is so poor. She has spoiled her new shoes in 
consequence. But I'm glad she has come straight to mamma with 
her trouble. Now, it's no use to cry over what is done. Your 
crying won't make your shoes new again. Put on your old ones and 
go back to Harry and sail your boat." 

Lucy put her arms around her mamma's neck, and said, 
"You're the dearest mamma in the world!" And I think she 
was very sweet. 

KATIE KYLE. 




dance and bark 
bright bonfire. 



barn. The clog was 
very watchful, and noth- 
ing could be disturbed while 
he was there. Shep has a 
very good time usually. He w 
a favorite with every one, for 
was very handsome and intelligent. 

Shep was like some boys : be liked 
to be where there was noise, and noth- 
ing delighted him more than to be 
where guns were fired; and he would 
gleefully if he could get where there was a 



« 



272 



SHEP'S CELEBRATION. 



One day the people where Shep lived had a celebration. A cannon 
was brought out and fired in honor of the occasion. Shep was on 




hand, prancing and giving short and excited yelps of joy. He would 
go quite up to the cannon, and watch for the sparks as they flew 
from its mouth. But finally Shep went too close, so that his head 
was directly under the piece when it was fired. 

The loud report stunned him, and made him entirely deaf. He 
knew something had happened to him, and he crept silently away 
and went home. No one saw him again till supper-time. His 
master called him loudly and looked for him everywhere, but he did 
not find him. 

Shep had crawled down into the cellar, and there he stayed for a 
number of days ; when he got very hungry he would creep out, look- 



SHEP'S CELEBRATION'. 273 

ing very sheepish and sorrowful, to get his meals ; but then he would 
go back as soon as he could. His master tried to coax him out, but 
he would not come unless he was very hungry. 

By and by Shep began to get better, so that he could understand 
some things that were said to him ; but it was quite a long time 
before he was really well. Then he seemed to be very happy ; but 




since then he has kept as far away as he can get when any noise 
is made. The lesson was pretty severe, and he never will for- 
get it. 

E. l. v. 




•*£*W£> 



FOUR LITTLE BOBOLINKS. 

Down in the grasses soft and sweet, 
In a cradle dainty and fine, 

Four little bobolinks nestle complete, 
Never making a sign, 



FOUR LITTLE BOBOLINKS. 



275 



Rob goes by, with a whistle gay, 
And a chirp like a bit of song ; 

" It's not our mother," the birdies say. 
But to dinner time seems lontc. 



^SrsK 



'mm&SM 






" Hi ! " cries Rob ; " there's a bobolink. 
And her nest is somewhere around 

Here in the grass — now, let me think, 
In a moment I'll have it found." 

Down with a flutter swift in the air, 
Amid the sweet grasses and clover, 

Bobolink lights, and is here and there — 
Makes of Rob a sad rover. 



Ah ! little robin, your boy's keen wit 
Is no match for mother-care ; 

Though from meadow to field you flit 
You will never find it there. 




•|fAfpK^P|L 



M4\ wL 




Four little bobolinks, safe and sweet, 

Eat their dinner with joy, 
While their mother softly says grace before meat, 

And thinks of the far-off boy. 

AMANDA M. DOUGLAS. 



THE FLAMINGO. 

What a beautiful bird this is, isn't it ? All rosy red from head 
to foot. But the baby flamingoes are dressed in very sober colors 
for more than two years ! 

If you could see them, and the curious way they eat, you would 
laugh. They look as if they stood on their heads, with their long- 
bills down in the mud, like a boat in shape. Their mouths are wide 
open, so as to catch all the worms and small frogs they can find 
there. They put them in the lower part of this boat, and use them 
whenever they are hungry. One flamingo always stands sentinel 
while the rest are getting their food, for fear they may be disturbed. 

But the queerest thing about this queer bird is the length of his 
slender legs. He stands upon one leg, while the other is tucked up 
out of sight, among his feathers. Don't you think the one on the 
ground must be cold while the other is snug and warm ? What can 
they do when the wind blows ? " Topple over," you would say. 
But they never do that. They stand as firmly as you do on your 
two feet and much shorter limbs. 

When the flamingo makes a nest he scoops it out of a high hill 
of mud, because of his long limbs. He sits across it as if it were a 
three-legged stool. 

They live in very hot countries, like the West Indies, and go 
always in flocks ; never afraid of animals, but always of men. B3 
dressing in their skins they can be very easily caught. 

MRS. G. HALL. 





THE FLAMINGO. 




Dear Lslittle Ones,. 

We have been here at this place for two weeks 

AND I LIKE IT VERY MUCH. PeT AND 1 PLAY ALL DAY ON THE BEACH AND SOME 
DAYS WE BATHE IN THE SURE I DONT LIKE MUCH TO BATHE. Anwie HOLDS ON 
TO ME SO TIGHT. BuT IT 15 LOTS OF FUN TO PULL (JOUR PANTS UP AND PADDLE 
ABOUT ON THE WET .SAND. THE OTHER DAY PeT TOOK HER DOLL, BeLLE FaRIS, 
WITH HER DOWN TO THE BEACH. W GOT TIHED OF HER PRESENTLY AND LEFT HER 
LYING ON THE SAND WHILE WE WENT TO BUILD A FORT. \/heN V/E CAME BACK WE 

found poor Belle buried head downward in the sand with only her feet stick- 
ing OUT. I LAUGHED SHE LOOKED SO FUNNY BUT VtT CRIED. /\nN!E SAID SOMEONE HAD 
DONE IT FOR A JOKE WHILE WE WERE AWAY. §HE HELPED US DIG BeLLE OUT. The 
SAND BRUSHED OFF AND SHE WASN'T MUCH HURT BUT PeT WONT TAKE HER OUT WITH 
US ANY MORE NOW. [ DONT SEE WHY LITTLE GIRLS LIKE DOLLS. I MUST STOP 
NOW AND GO DOWN TO THE BEACH,. ^ 

\jOUH JRIEND 

fRANKJE. 




THE CRICKET 





AND THE WORMS 



the bough of a small mulberry- 
tree there lay some caterpillars' eggs, small 
and silvery white. They were no larger than 
the tiniest bead you put around your dolly's 
neck. Pretty soon they swelled and burst, and 
out crawled some very tiny black worms, that 
began to eat up, at once, their cradle walls. 
They would not have asked you for anything 
better ; all the while they are growing stronger 
and stronger upon this funny fare. 

One day a noisy cricket came by ; his voice was so shrill that he 
made the poor caterpillars very nervous ! He was saucy, too, and 
put on a great many lordly airs. He talked much about poor, crawl- 
ing worms and their horrid looks, and wished they could have a hap- 
pier lot ! 

In their quiet, patient way the caterpillars wished so too, for they 
really felt very humble. But after the cricket was gone their faces 
brightened, to think that, at least, they were not so impolite, if they 
could not aspire to his rank in life. 

Just then a kind little sunbeam came along, and wrapped them all 
up in his golden mantle, fondled them, and made them feel quite con- 
tented with their humble lot. 

By and by the cricket appeared again. What was his surprise to 
see these little black worms all transformed into gorgeous crea- 
tures, with beautiful golden wings, in color just like the friendly 
sunbeams. They were about to float away into the air, far above the 
tallest trees. The poor cricket could only jump his length upon the 



280 HOW TOT WENT TO THE PARK. 

ground. " Who would have thought it ? " he muttered to himself. 
" I'd better have held my tongue, for we never know what's coming 
in this world ! " 

And how the sunbeam did laugh to see the surprise of the cricket, 
and thought that it served him just right ! 

MRS. G. HALL. 




HOW TOT WENT TO THE PARK. 

The day Tot was three years old one of her presents was a dear 
baby brother. She loved him very much, but wondered what he found 
to cry about so often, when her mamma was so good to him. One day 
Mary was away ; mamma had to do everything herself, and look 
after Tot and baby beside. She brought Tot downstairs to dress 
her. Before she could do so baby screamed, and she ran upstairs 
again, telling Tot to stay in the room until she returned. Tot 
thought she was a long time, and began looking around for something 
to amuse herself. She saw her papa's boots in the corner. The next 
minute she had them on her feet. Then she went into the hall, and 
with a cane reached his hat, and put that on. She tried to open the 
front door. That being locked, she trotted out to the kitchen. The 
milk-boy had left the back door ajar, as he usually did, and she was 
soon in the street. 

The house stood on a corner, and Tot hesitated a moment as to 
which street to take. At last she thought of the Park. She had 
been there the day before with Mary, and saw lots of bright dande- 
lions. Now she would go and gather some for baby. So off she 
went, though she made slow progress with such large boots, and her 
hat fell off two or three times. 



HOW TOT WENT TO THE PARK. 



281 




She had just reached the spot where the dandelions were the 
thickest, when papa, hurrying home to breakfast, came upon the 



odd-looking little figure. 



He took her up in his arms, with the boots in his hand, and has- 
tened home as fast as he could. Then Tot wondered why papa and 
mamma laughed so heartily. 

LIZZIE MAY SHERWOOD. 




Bright-faced darlings, here you ; 

Looking up so fresh and gay, 
Why purse your pretty lips so tight, 

Won't you tell your secret, pray ? 



The rare bright secret of your bloom, 
Wondrous tints and matchless dyes. 

Did you di*aw it from earth's gems, 
Or was it lent by sunset skies? 

Nod your heads together close, 
Whisper fast as e'er you please, 

Well you know I can't translate, 
Naughty, mocking, gay heart's-ease ! 



Little blue-eyed summer maid. 

Standing straight upon your stem, 

You look gentle, shy, and sweet, 
I'll ask you instead of them. 



Whisper, darling, do not fear ; 

Oh ! indeed I'll never tell. 
Can it be you, too, refuse ? 

How hard-hearted ! Fare you well ! 

JENNIE s. jrnsoN. 




TENTING OUT. 

School was done, and Bob and Dick went to their grandma's 
in the country. 

The very first night they teased grandma to let them sleep out 
in a tent. She basted two sheets together and stretched them 
over the low limb of the early sweet-apple tree in the field. She 




fastened the ends down to the ground with twine and wooden 
pins. 

Bob and Dick thought it just lovely ! But somehow they could 
not go to sleep. The house seemed such a great way off! And 
it was so dark ! And the crickets chirped so loudly ! 

But they were very tired boys, and after a while their eyes 
would not stay open. 

In the night Bob awoke. There was some creature running 



284 TENTING OUT. 

about the tent ! Oh, clear ! Was it a bear ? Bears were fond of 
sweet apples, he had heard grandpa say. He waked Dick. 

Nearer and nearer came the tramping. Crunch ! Crunch ! as 
the apples were eaten. Bob and Dick clung to each other in 
terror, then peeped out from beneath the tent. 

There it was — a great black creature — and it snuffled its nose 
over the ground for more apples. 

" Let's run to the house," whispered Bob. 

" Oh. he'll chase us ! I know he can run the fastest," whimpered 
Dick, under his breath ; " hear his teeth ! " 

" Let's wait till he gets on the other side of the tent," quaked 
Bob. " There — come ! " and out the boys scrambled on the grass, 
then up and away across the field, with the black thing racing on 
behind. 

How the boys screamed ! Grandpa and grandma came out in 
their nightcaps, just as black Jerry scooted through the broken 
fence of his pen and went out of sight. 

Yes, it was only the black pig, who had got out of his pen. 
He was always doing it, and had gone straight to the sweet- 
apple tree. He knew where it was. 

After that Bob and Dick thought the chamber with the sloping 
roof was good enough for them, if they did bump their heads 
on the rafters once in a while. 

CHUISTINE STEPHENS. 




^ri^^Sp 




A CHICKEN WITH A WOODEN LEG. 

Stella and Laura had some little white bantams, which 
were very tame, and of which they were very fond. There were 
two of them, — a rooster and a hen. Neither was larger than 
good-sized pigeons. 




A CHICKEN WITH 



WOODEN LEG. 



287 



The rooster put on far more airs, and held his head higher, 
than the great Cochin-China in the barn-yard, and he always 
managed to be ahead of the latter in getting off the first crow 
in the morning. In the winter the children were fond of coast- 
ing, and they seldom thought of starting out without " Tip " and 
" Ty," as they had curiously named their feathered friends. * 

These chickens really seemed to like to ride. The little girls 




would s;et on the bi^ sled, each 



holding 



her 



pet, and off they 
would start. Sometimes the sled 
would be sent down, carrying the chickens 

alone. "Tip" would generally keep bis balance, but his mate 
always became frightened and jumped off when about half-way 
down. 

The children kept these chickens for over three years. One 
night a weasel got into the hen-house and killed them. 

Some time after this, Stella found a little chicken with its 
leg badly broken. She carried it to Adam, the gardener. The leg 
was so badly crushed that it could never be of any use, and 
Adam cut it off. Then he carefully bound up the stump. After 
a while it healed, and he made as well as he could a wooden leg, 



288 



A CHICKEN WITH A WOODEN LEG. 



which he bound on to the stump. The chicken thrived, and 
seemed to take kindly to its wooden leg. 

Sometimes it forgot, and tried to scratch with it, but it would 
not work. 

It had a peculiar walk, — a sort of a hop, from which the chil- 
dren christened it " Hoppy." At night they put it up in a box 
made on purpose for it, fastened up inside of the hen-house. 
Hoppy lived to a good old age, but never did anything re- 
markable. 

AUNT ESTELLE. 




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'■ I had tried almost everything for 
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77 East Illinois St., Chicago, 111. 



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PREPARED BY 

Dr. J. C. Ayer & Co. Lowell, Mass. 

Sold by all Druggists and Dealers in Medicine. 





PENGERIM 
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in the essential qualities of Durability, 
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ROSES 

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Now that the roses are coming, every lady 
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POT-POURRI. 

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by mail. Postage and packing 15 cts. extra. 
Larger jars at $1., 1.25, $1.50 and upwards, 
sent by express at expense of purchaser. 

KECIPE IN EVERY JAR. 



NESTLE'S 



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Japanese Importing Co., 

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FOR INFANTS IN HOT WEATHER. 

Requires No Milk in Its Preparation, 
and is Very Effective in the Pre- 
vention of Cholera-lnfantum. 

" Ziemssen's Cyclopedia of the practice of Medicine," Vol. 
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ing properties of cow's milk in a digestible form. 

For twenty years Nestle's Food has been used with great 
success when all other preparations have failed in the " fatal 
heated term." 

There are several infant's food's called *' milk foods" which 
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NESTLE'S FOOD 

if you wish to carry your infant safely through the hot 
weather. Sample sent to any mother on application to 

THOMAS LEEMINC & CO., Sole Agents, 

18 College Place, ----- New York. 



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AND THE NURSERY. 




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BOSTON BUREAU OF ADVERTISING, 




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A valuable pamphlet on the Oare of I nf anta 
and Invalids sent on application. 
Sold by Druggists. 25c, 50c.» 8I.OO. 
-J WELLS, RICHARDSON & CO. BURLINGTON, vt. ft 



1888 -BABIES -1888. 

To the mother of any baby born this year we 
will send on*application a Cabinet Photo, of the 
" Sweetest, fattest, healthiest baby in the coun- 
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msing Jjfictatfd Food as a substitute for moth- 
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mother given. Give date of birth, 

Wells, Richardson & Co., 

Burlington, Vt. 



DCCDICCC nVEC Are the BEST. 
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stamps taken. 

E. B. GOODNOW & CO., 
Box 1687, BOSTON, MASS. 




PURE 



p?pRicrs 

CREAM 

lAKlHg 

*pWDE* 

3 T PERFECT MADE, 



Its flnperior excellence proven in millions of homes for 
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Dr. Price's the only Baking Powder that does not contain 
Ammonia, Lime, or Alum. Sold only in Cans. 

PRICE BAKING POWDER CO., 

NEW YORK. CHICAGO. ST. LOUIS. 



BROWN'S FRENCH DRESSING. 

The Original. Beware of imitations. 
PARIS MEDAL ON EVERY BOTTLE 




AWARDED HIGHEST PRIZE AND ONLY 

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HIGHEST AWARD, NEW ORLEANS EXPOSITION. 
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SENSIBLE 
WOMEN 

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Buttons at front instead 
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everywhere. Send for Circular. 

_ FERRIS BROSi'IanufiictnriTS 

341 Broadway, NEW YORK. 




LADY AGENTS SS.ES5 

employment at $50 to $100 per 
month selling Queen City Sup- 
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Address Cincinnati Suspender 
Co.,11 E. Ninth £>t. ( Cincinnati,0. 



INK 



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PINK | RED | GREEN" 



You can make it yourself without the Blightest trouble, and at a 
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information by circular, free by mail. AddreeB, 
WALPOLE DYE AND CHEMICAL COMPANY. 
»■ 1 19 Milk St., Boston, Mass., U. 3. A. 




BOBBY AND MARY JANE. 



The policeman crept quietly into the kitchen 
To court on the sly Mary Jane so bewitching, 
But was startled to view, on all sides around him, 
Other policemen, who seemed to surround him. 



But he very soon found it was but his reflection 
In the pots and pans polished up to perfection. 
And the servant explained how she made such a show 
By the everyday use of Sapolio. 



D U RKEE .3 



GAUNTLET.BRAND. 

w&* SPICES 

* MUSTARD. 

SOLD ONLY IN FULL WEIGHT SEALED PACKAGES. 

Guaranteed absolutely pure, and warranted to excel 
til others in strength, richness, flavor and cleanliness. 




SALAD 
DRESSING 




PEERLESS DYES 



Are the EE&T. 

Sold by Druggists. 



BOYS 

Kow's your time to get up clubs 
for our celebrated goods and pro- 
cure a Beautiful Watch — 
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— — — Setter — Imported Swiss Move- 
ment. Just the watch for boys. We have in stock a 
large line of premiums for all. For full particulars 
address The Great American Tea, Co. 

P. O. Box 289. 31 & 33 Vesey St., New York, JS. Y. 





GOLD MEDAL, PAEIS, 1878. 

BAKER'S 



Warranted absolutely purt 
Cocoa, from which the excess of 
Oil has been removed. It has three 
times the strength of Cocoa mixed 
with Starch, Arrowroot or Sugar, 
and is therefore far more economi- 
cal, costing less than one cent a 
cup. It Is delicious, nourishing, 
strengthening, easily digested, and 
admirably adapted for invalids aB 
well as for persons in health. 
Sold by Grocers eve rywhere. 

W. BAKER & CO., Dorchester, Mass. 



CANDY 



Send SI, S2, $3, or ?5 for a retail 
box by express of the best candies 
in America, put up elegantly, and 
strictly pure. Suitable for presents. 
Refers to all Chicago. Address 



I GUNTHEK, Confectioner, 818 State St., Chicago. 



."BATH NIGHT" OR "THE KNIGHT OF THE BATH." 




I WANT 



PE AR S* SOAP. 



iiirtTirTii 
— — — H 
1 




Lliumiij 



T is sp^cially recommended for Infants and 



Children, because it is perfectly pure, and does not 



irritate their delicate sensitive skin, nor make 



their little eyes smart. It lasts so long that 



// is certainly the CHEAPEST as well as the BEST Toilet Soap. 
It makes Children feel comfortable, and hence happy after 
their bath and by its use the natural softness and bright- 
ness of their complexions are improved and preserved. 
The Great Authority on the Skin, the Late 

+ + jSir Erasmus Wilson, F.R.S. + * 

President of the Royal College of Surgeons of Engl and. 

calls it a '"BALM FOR THE SKIN," and strongly 

recommends its use for the complexion. 



TABLETS 6d. & Is. Each. 

SOLD EVERYWHERE. 



INSIST ON HAVING 

* PEARS' * 



REGISTERED. 



*w- 



■O* 




*f" 



-<* 




Copyright, 1888, by Russbw. Publishing Compaot.] fEntered at tbe P O. at Boston as second-class mattefr 



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CONTENTS. 



HAYING TIME L. A. France 

(Illustrated by Miss E. S. Tucker. ) 

THE NEW FERRY-BOAT Lizzie May Simmiwood . 

(Illustrated by A. Buhler.; 

ONLY WITH ME Geo. S. Burleigh . . . 

(.Illustrated by Jessie C. Shepherd < 

THE HOME-MXDE HORSE M. E. N. Hathaway . . 

(Illustrated by Minnie L. Kirk.; 

PIE-TOWN George Cooper .... 

(Illustrated by Maud Humphrey. J 

FRANKIE'S LETTER No. io ........ . Frankie 

(Illustrated by Jessie McDernioii.i 

THE CHIMNEY SWALLOW Marian Douglas . . . 

(Illustrated by H. P. Barnes.) 

ALL ABOUT A BIG WAVE Johanna Staats .... 

(Illustrated by J. Steeple Davis.) 

WHO IS HE? C. Bei.i 

(Illustrated by H. P. Barnes.) 

AUGUST L. B. C 

(Illustrated by Lizbeth B. Comins.) 

JODIE'S MISTAKE Mrs. S. M. H. Gardner 

(Illustrated by Parker Hay den.) 

WHEN I'M A MAN A.' Giddings Park . . . 

(Illustrated by Carl Hirscbberg.) 

OUT IN A WIND Christine Stephens . . 

(Illustrated by C. Meute.) 

MAMMA'S GOOD-NIGHT Eudora G. Bu.msteau . 

(Illustrated by Louis Meynelle.l 

A LAND VOYAGE C. Emma Cheney . . . 

(Illustrated by L. H. Burr.) 

AFTER THE SHOWER George Cooper .... 

(Illustrated by H. P. Barnes.) 



J 'A'.K 

-'M 

-<)' 



5°4 
306 

3°7 
30S 

31 

3>: 

3«< 
3' 

3-' 



The Illustrative Department under the direction of Mr. George T. Andrew. 



OUR LITTLE ONES AND THE NURSERY, 



One Year .... 
Sixteen Months . 



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TERMS (in advance). 
. $1.50. Eight Months 

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Order, Check, or Registered Letter. Checks, Drafts, and Orders should be made payable to the 

RUSSELL PUBLISHING COMPANY, BOSTON, MASS. 



FINE COMPLEXION, SMOOTH, SOFT SKIN. 

Mention Our Little Onf.s, and send four cents for sample of V ACKER'S TAR SOAR. Use it over; 
night with warm water and rough wash-cloth, and you will be gratified with soft, smooth skin and improves 
complexion. Do not hesitate to use RAVKER'S TAR SOAP on your face. It is absolutely pure. Wand I 
and grateful to the senses. It is adapted and extensively used for washing the delicate skin of infants, and in 1 
the treatment of skin and scalp diseases. It prevents Chapping, Chafing and Redness ; cures Itching. Dandruff, 
Acne, etc., and is an invaluable antiseptic purifier for offensive perspirations, discharges, etc. 25c. Druggists, orl 

THE FiLCKSR 3VEI*C5-. CO., 100 Fulton Street, New York. 




HAYING TIME. 







Vol. VIII. 



1588 

Copyright, 1888, by Russell Publishing Oompany. 



No. 10. 



HAYING TIME. 

The men were in the meadow. 

Busy making fragrant hay> 
And the children went to help them, 

But 'twas in a curious way. 

Perhaps they had forgotten 

That to help they first intended ; 

But no matter how they started, 
In a frolic they soon ended. 

There they ran, and raced, and shouted, 
There they tipped and tumbled over, 

There they hid themselves down deep in 
The heaps of scented clover. 

They are sure that they have never 
Had so nice a place to play, 

As they had down in the meadow, 
When the men were making hay. 



L. A. FRANCE. 




mm'.e&Ji'"J^i"""—'- 



THE NEW FERRY-BOAT. 



The new ferry-boat was papa Todd's old skiff. Ross had gained 
permission to use it because he expected Harley and Alfred to spend 
the afternoon, and he wished to have some " fun " that was new. 

Ross was the captain, Alfred the steam-whistle, while Harley's 
duty was to ring the bell — mamma's dinner-bell — when the boat 
was ready to start or stop. When everything was arranged the skiff 
made two or three trips across the Cove and back again, and was 
declared ready for work. 

Aunt Myra was the first customer. She was carried over safely. 
Though Ross said he would not be mean enough to ask any fee from 
his relations, she insisted upon giving each boy a bright new nickel. 
Wishing that they might earn lots of money during the afternoon, 
she went on her way. 

Bill Smithson came across the bridge just at that moment. Seeing 
the boys he begged to be allowed to join them. But he was a rough, 
rude boy, and the captain refused. 

Now good old Uncle Simms, with his white hair and gold-headed 



THE NEW FERRY-BOAT. 



293 



cane, came in sight. Of course he would patronize the new ferry- 
boat, but the boys must sing for him. So, as they rowed, they sang 
"Three Jolly Fishermen." Uncle Simms gave the captain a dime, 
and told him to treat his crew. 

Next came a little girl, with a basket of eggs in one hand and a 
pail of blueberries in the other. When she got on board she set the 




basket and pail on the bottom of the boat, just behind Alfred, who 
was to row this time. 

The wind blew cpiite hard, and Alfred had to pull with all his 
might. Not being a skilful rower, his oars slipped, and over he 
went backwards, upsetting basket and pail ! Broken eggs and blue- 
berries got sadly mixed, and poor Ada began to cry. 

The boys gave her the nickels and the dime to pay damages, tied 
up the ferry-boat, and went home, feeling that " ferrying" was un- 
profitable business. 

LIZZIE MAY SHERWOOD. 







fc™ 



fl 



ONLY WITH ME. 

Under the boughs of the tupelo tree 

She sat alone, on a mossy stone, 
And sang : " Who'll come and play with me ? 
I have read and said my ABC, 

And fed the biddy, and sleepied Fiddie, 
And I'm just as lonesome as I can be ! " 

Up the bark of the tupelo tree 

There crawled, aslant, a big black ant, 

With a big white egg as large as he, 

And hid it away where none could see ; 

Then, down and back on the selfsame track, 

A hundred times went, "'busy's a bee." 

High in a hole of the tupelo tree, 

At the top of the trunk, a merry chipmunk. 
With a cheek full of nuts and a heart full of glee, 
Came hiding her treasure, and sang " Ker-chee ! " 

As she ran for more to heap in her store, — 
There were twenty loads if there were three ! 

Close clown at the root of the tupelo tree, 

Rolling a ball, not dainty at all, 
Was a tumbling, gold-winged scarabee ; 
And the ball went back with a sudden gee, 

A score and a score of times, and more ; 
It was work to do, but fun to see ! 



ONLY WITH ME. 



295 



" Under the boughs of the tupelo tree, 

On a mossy stone, what do you, alone, 
My bonny Bess ? " — " Alone ? " said she, 
" Oh, no, clear mamma ; — such company ! 
We were all so busy it 
made me dizzy, — 
I just forgot I was only 
with me ! " 

GEO. S. BURLEIGH. 





THE HOME-MADE HORSE. 



When Harry was a little boy his mamma was very ill and could 
not take care of him. His grandma carried him to her home and 
kept him through the summer. He missed his toys, as his grandma 
had not thought to put any of them into her trunk. She had to 
search all her drawers and the upper shelves in her closets to find 
things for him to play with. She brought out a great many articles 



THE HOME-MADE HORSE. 



297 



that he could make useful, and he soon had a wonderful house fit- 
ted up in one corner of the sitting-room. He was quite happy then, 
and said, " I'm having a good time now, grandma ; but I wish you 
would look around again and see if you can't find a horse tor me. ' 




Grandma went into the big garret and found a chair that had been 
broken in such a way there was nothing left of it but the frame of the 
seat and the rockers. She took this and fastened a piece of board 
across the frame for the body of the horse. At one end of the board 
she nailed a block for the head. Then she laid some stuffing on, and 
wound cloth over it, making the body soft and round. 

Harry stood close by watching every part of the work. When 
grandma tacked on a pair of leather ears, and a long tail made of a 



298 



THE HOME-MADE HORSE. 



skein of faded black yarn, lie shouted with delight, eager for his first 
ride. 

" Wait a minute ; he's not quite ready," said grandma. She 
searched once more, and found some straps and buckles, and put them 
together to make a bridle. 

" Now, come," she said. " One, two, three ! up and away ! " 

Then Harry sprang upon the horse's back, and tried him to see 
how he would go. 

" Grandma ! " he exclaimed. " This is the way I shall make 
him trot ; then I shall make him go faster and gallop. He's good 
enough for anybody, and I'm going to have him named Dandy Jim, 
like Uncle Frank's pony." 

Harry was now perfectly contented from morning to night with 
the pleasures and playthings that grandma had provided for him. 
During his summer visit he spent many happy hours riding on the 
queer old home-made horse. 

M. E. N. HATHEWAY. 





PIE-TOWN. 

How is it built ? Of dainty crust ; 

You can't starve there, for eat you must. 

High on the trees, all in a row. 

Peach, pumpkin, mince, and plum pies grow. 






Who is the king ? Jack Horner, — he 
Who is well known in history. 
His throne of pastry fine is reared ; 
By all his people he's revered. 



500 PIE-TOWN. 

What do they do '! Why, eat all day, 
And not one penny have to pay ; 
Pull out the plums, and munch and munch 
Hot pies for breakfast, dinner, lunch. 




Where do they walk ? Through streets of spice, 
Loaf-sugar, citron, — all things nice; 
Or, if a sail they choose to take, 
There is a pretty custard lake. 

Which is the road ? By way of Sleep, 
Beyond Nap-Hill straight on you keep, 
Up Nightmare Lane a mile or so, — 
How do you think you'd like to go ? 

GEORGE COOPER. 







LonsBranch August, izs? 
Dear" Little Ones'' 

Yesterday was mn birthday and in the evening my mam 

MA GAVE ME ft LITTLE PARTY. We PLAYED GAMES AND DANCED AND WE HAD ICE- 
CREAM AND CAKE FOR 5UPP£R "JHREE CHILDREN CAME TO MY PARTY, rET AND A 
LITTLE BOY AND GIRL WHO LIVE IN THE COTTAGE NEXT TO OURS. I LIKE THEAA VE- j 
RY MUCH. The LITTLE GIRL IS SO PRETTY AND HER BROTHER TELLS SUCH NICE STO- 
RIES. Last night when we were tired of playing he told us a splendid one. 
pr was about a man who went to live in a place where all the people were 
giants. Even the children were s ° big that they could pick the man up in 
their hands and play with him just as I would take up one of Pet's little CHI 

NA DOLLS. fJE HAD TO BE VERY CAREFUL NOT TO GET TRODDEN ON OR SWEPT OUT 

WITH the dust when THE maid WAS HOUSE CLEANING. \ LIKED the story so MUCH 
THAT 1 TALKED ABOUT IT ALL NIGHT IN MY SLEEP. /^AM/AA SAID I HAD HAD TOO 
MUCH ICE CREAM AND SHE TOLD AnNIE NOT TO GIVE ME ANY DESERT AT DINNER TO 
DAY. I AM SIX YEA.RS OLD NOW AND NEXT MONTH I AM GOING TO SCHOOL I 
WILL WRITE TO YOU ABOUT IT WHEN ] GET BAO\ TO NaAsHINTON. 

^TOUR FRIENO TraNKIE. 



6r '-** 



1 r>£ Cni^^>cJwdwl)°v/ ^ 




The wide, old house was damp 

and chill; 
The wind's changed voice was harsh 

and hollow ; 
But on the hearth we dared not light 
A fire to make the evening bright. 
For through the casing came the 

shrill. 
Loud chatter of a chimney-swallow. 
" Oh, let him sta}', the dark-winged 

guest," 
I said, " and build with us his nest." 



He came. A social soul was he ; 

His kinsfolk, to his farthest cousins, 

He wanted close to him to be. 

They built by his their nests by dozens. 

We soon could hear, loud overhead, 

The young ones crying to be fed ; 

The clamor of each little brood. 

When back the old birds came with food. 



THE CHIMNEY SWALLOW. 



303 



As if with wings the days new by ; 
'Twas time the birds their wings should try. 
One August morn we heard a sound ; — 
Prom out the fireplace flew a swallow, 

That, like a mad thing, dashed 
around ; 
\i|, y\ i And, from the chimney's 

smoky hollow, 

Close following after, 
shrieking, crying, 
A whole wild flock 
of birds came 

The room was full of . ^-- V> *A \A, % m g- 

them ; they hung 
To chairs and picture-frames ; 

they clung 
Entangled in the curtain's lace, 
And on the peacock's plumes they swung 
That o'er the mantel had a place. 
In vain we set the windows wide ; 

The more we tried to drive them out, 
The more they madly beat about. 
We caught and carried them outside, 
And, one by one, we watched them fly 
Till, when the last was free, we cried, 
" Now, Sooty-wings, good-by ! good-by ! 
Go where you will, the wide world o'er, 
But to our chimney come no more ! " 

MARIAN DOUGLAS. 




11 



M, 






ALL ABOUT A BIG WAVE. 



A blue sky overhead was like a vast umbrella. Miles of soft 
white sand, and the great Atlantic was laughing and dimpling in 
the hot rays of the morning sun. 

The night before there had been a storm. Even now, once in a 
while, a great wave came racing in from out at sea and rolled far up 
on the damp sand. 

Tt was the bathing hour. Many people were ducking up and 
down amid the breakers, laughing merrily when those large waves 
filled their mouths full of the bad-tasting salt water. 

Harold, whom somebody calls " Golden hair," and Marjorie were 
playing horse, and great fun they were having. They would race up 
and down the sands until Marjorie, who was driving, was tired. 
Then she would tie her pony to one of the awning stakes, and lie on 
the rug under the awning until rested. 

A number of people were sitting under these gay-colored awnings, or 
tents, watching the antics of the bathers. Sometimes when the great 
rollers, as the very large waves are called, came in, they were obliged 
to crawl out in a verv funny manner at the back of these little tents. 



ALL ABOUT A BIG WAVE. 



305 



If they did not do so they would get very wet. That is not nice 
at all unless one has a bathing-dress on, and some do not like it even 
then. 

Now, dear little Marjorie, with a great deal of puffing, had just 
managed to tie the reins in a very tight knot, with her fat little 
fingers, when one of these great waves came rolling in to play too. 
Marjorie saw it coming, gave a little gasp, and ran as fast as her 
chubby legs would take her. 

There was Harold tied to the stake, and there was the big wave 




coming nearer, nearer. With a splash it went all over him, wetting 
his dainty frock and taking his breath quite away. 

When the wave went back once more, thanks to Marjorie's hard 
knot, it did not take any little boy with it. But it left a very dis- 
mal one for somebody to untie and soothe. 

The summer is over now, and the children are in their city homes 
once more. When Nurse Gretchen takes Harold to see his little 
friend Marjorie, the first thing she asks is, " Harold ! do you 
remember that big wave ? " johanna staats. 





Who is that man in the field ? 
How still he is ! What is he point- 
ing at ? Does he see us ? 
"Good-morning, sir!" 
He does not move. Perhaps he 
did not hear us. 

Oh. look ! A robin is perched on 
his hat. I do not believe it is a 
man at all. Let us go up to him. 
No, it is not a man. " How do 
you do, Mr. Stick-dressed-up ? Your 
hat has a great hole in it, sir. And you have a bird's nest in 
your pocket. Did you know it?" 

There are three little birds in it. How sweetly they chirp ! 
If you do your duty, Mr. Stick, and scare the crows away, I 
hope the little birds will sing to you some day. 

The crows pull up the farmer's young corn, but the little birds 
will catch insects for him. 

Good-by, Mr. Stick ! You are not handsome, but I hope you 

will be useful. 

c. BEIX. 





• $ 

$#?*■ 

,_ J pray, 
V? » 

, w To dm^tfre 
\tVit rao/S of 

°°reml? till 
It] jA°lv^j| 





. MeTLW ■ 

■\ little ^IH , 
Who vvSKcMt 
o/t Vrrl 0^ k t r 

lor "^krCy ^ 

sVre 3 o0 i 

^01/ &re Very 

<§ux b&cL u 
yoi/g^re WridL 
&■(■. 



Aa.bityfttj'WJ ' 



JODIE'S MISTAKE. 



Master Jodie, six years old, was spending the summer with his 
mother among the Rocky mountains. Very recently he met with a 
comical adventure. 

He had walked with his mamma down a beautiful canon for a great 

distance to see a fine 
waterfall. Here they 
rested ibr some time, but 
the little boy was impa- 
tient to go further. He 
walked alone to the 
front of a toll-house near- 
by. Just as he stepped 
beneath the upraised gate 
a sharp voice shouted, 
" Pay your toll ! " 

Jodie stopped and 
looked about, but saw no 
person and began to 
move on. 
scalliwag ! 

your fifty cents," the 
mysterious voice cried. 

The little boy was 
frightened. He remem- 
bered to have heard that 
the toll on mountain roads 
was very high, and that 
rough people sometimes 
refused to pay and were 
severely punished. He 
turned to go back, but 
the same fierce demand 
was made : " Stand 
still ! Fifty cents ! " 




began 
" Out with it, 
Lay down 



JODIE 'S MISTAKE. 



309 




fjiiil"-: v P' ffl: iH i '"'' 



At last, in despair, he 
grew very calm, and, tak- 
ing off his cap, stood look- 
ing eagerly about while 
he said, " I am sorry, sir, 
that I do not know where 
you are, but I guess you 
will understand me from 
here. I have not got any 
money with me. If you 
will let me go back as far 

as the waterfall, I will find my mother, and I guess she will give it 

to me. Please, sir, do not be cross ! " 

Just as he had finished his little, polite speech, he heard a merry 

laugh. His mamma was standing beside him, pointing to a cage in 

the shed, where a great magpie was perched. 

" There, Jodie, is the voice that troubled you." It was hard work 

for him to believe that such a creature could have deceived him. 

"If it had been a parrot I should have suspected him," the little boy 

said, "but I never thought of that bird talking." 

MRS. S. M. H. GARDNER. 



fV 




WHEN I'M A MAN. 

"When I'm a man," said little Carle, 

"A President I'll be, 
And live in the White House, and have 

Great crowds to call on me ! 

"I'll have a golden chariot, 

And lots of horses fine ; 
Have bon-bons nice for every meal, 

And ask the kings to dine; 

" I'll have a toy and candy shop, 
With splendid sleds and kites ; 

I'll never get up mornings, and 
I'll sit up all the nights ; 

" I'll have a pretty barber's pole, 
With stripes of blue and red. 

Beside my door, and on the lawn 
I'll have my pet calf led. 



WHEN I'M A MAN. 



311 




" When I'm a grown-up man I'll wear 
My best clothes every day, 

I'll play ball in the parlor, and 
I'll always have my way ! 



312 



WHEN I'M A MAN. 

" I'll make each day a holiday, 
With Christmas all the year, 

And every night with toys and things, 
Old Santa Glaus — Oh — dear — 




" 1 guess — I'm — tired ! " The blue eyes close, 

While nods the curly head, 
And mamma's would-be President 

Is kissed and put to bed. 

A. GIDDINGS PARK. 



OUT IN A WIND. 



Aunt Kitty had come to make little Polly's mother a visit. She 
brought with her a red silk parasol, with a' fine black lace border and 
an amber handle. It was very beautiful. 

Now, little Polly had only a poor old gingham one, with a broken 
handle. It would now and then shut right down over her head 
when she didn't expect it, which was very 
provoking. The boys and girls at school 
always laughed and made great sport 
of it. 

One day it entered her heart — poor, 
proud, little Polly ! — to take Aunt 
Kitty's parasol — just for once. 
She would be very careful and 
not let any one lay a finger on 
it. She went into the hall. 
There it hung;, bright and 
shining, on the hat-tree. 

Without stopping to 
think twice she quickly 
caught it down, and 
with her book-bag 
in the other hand 
ran out to school. 
It was in June, and 
there was a high 
wind ; but Polly put 
up the parasol and 
trudged on. 





OUT IN A WIND. 



OUT IN A WIND. 



315 



How the wind blew ! It tossed the parasol about, almost taking- 
Polly off her feet. But she hung on bravely. By and by she turned 
a corner, and the strong wind beat into her face. 

Quick as a wink up went the parasol. It pulled like a cart-horse — 
almost. 

Billy Piper shouted, " Let go ! Let go, Polly ! " 

But Polly would not let go. She was afraid that the wind would 
take it right up in the sky. 

Then something happened, and Billy cried, "I told you so ! " 

Polly still hung to the parasol ; but what a queer-looking thing ! 
Instead of the beautiful silk, the frame-work was on the outside, and 
the handle was right on the top. 

It was all topsy-turvy. Polly gazed a moment in terror, then fled 
towards home as fast as she could, with the odd thing sailing out 
behind. 

Aunt Kitty soon righted it, and poor, little, frightened Polly was 
comforted; but she did not soon forget that it was best not to meddle 
with things which did not belong to her. 

CHRISTINE STEPHENS. 





MAMMA'S GOOD-NIGHT. 



Mamma loosens the baby's frock, 

And takes off each little shoe and sock ; 

She softly brushes the golden hair, 

And pats the shoulders, dimpled and bare ; 

She puts on the night-gown, white and long, 

Humming the while an evening song : 

" Daytime is over ; 

Play -time is closing ; 

Even the clover 

Is nodding and dozing. 
Baby's bed shall be soft and white. 
Dear little boy, good-night ! good-night ! " 



MAMMA 'S GO OD-NIGHT. 



!17 




Mamma kisses the little pink feet, 
And the tiny hands so dimpled and sweet, 
The rosy cheeks, and the forehead white, 
And the lips that prattle from morn till night 
With a last fond kiss for the golden crown 
Gently and softly she lays him down, 
And in the hush that the twilight brings 
She stands by her darling's bed and sings: 

" Over the billow 

Soft winds are sighing ; 

Round baby's pillow 

Bright dreams are flying. 
Here comes a pretty one, sure to alight ! 
Dear little boy, good-night ! good-night ! " 



EUDORA G. BUMSTEAD. 





A LAND VOYAGE. 



Some children playing on the sea-shore one day found an empty 
barrel. After rolling it around a little while, Robert thought of a 
use for it. 

" sister ! " he cried, " I mean to go clown the bluff in this, 
like the man who went over Niagara Falls in a barrel." 

The children clapped their hands. Fanny looked sober. Her 
brother's " 'speriments " sometimes failed. 

Then a dozen little brown hands began to push the barrel up 
the steep bank above the beach. Robert was such a daring fellow 
that everybody liked to help him. 

Once at the top, he explained his plan. It sounded so well that 
Fanny believed Robert could do it, but she wished in her heart 
that he would give it up. 

When all was ready he took off his shoes, hat, and neck-tie. 
He made a low bow to the little company, kissed his sister, and 
crept into the barrel. Fanny tried not to cry, but her heart beat fast. 

The signal was given and off went the barrel. Crashing through 
brush and over stones, it flew down, down, down. Then it shot 
across a strip of smooth beach, out into the sea. 



A LAND VOYAGE. 



319 



The tide was going out, and soon barrel, Robert, and all were 
lightly floating on the waves. This was more than he had thought 
of. He had been ashamed to scream on his rough passage down 
the hill. The touch of cold water loosened his tongue. His cries 
were of little use, however. There was nobody to hear him ; besides, 
the barrel, which was now pretty full of water, was fast sinking. 




Of course the watching children called loudly for help, but 
people thought them only playing, as usual. At last a bather heard 
their cries and hurried to the spot. It was not a minute too 
soon. The barrel, with its precious load, was fast going down. 

Robert was taken home and put in his bed. The sobbing chil- 
dren who followed him thought he would die. He soon began to 
get well, however ; but he was quite ready to give up trying dan- 
gerous " 'speriments." 

C. EMMA CHENEY. 



ilji^vf t e rTb e^ ^ ° Ve r 




Cat-birds, from the wayside bushes, 
Cry, " The shower is clone ! " 

Crickets, in the tangled grasses, 
Chirp to see the sun. 

Hiding bees, from roses peeping, 

Clamber down the stems ; 
Drip, drip, with the freshened breezes, 

What a spray of gems! 

Robin, with his breast of crimson, 

Bobs up in the clover, 
Piping, " Now's the time for frolic ! 

Come ! the rain is over ! " 

" Caw ! caw ! " call the crows so hoarsely, 

Ere they fly in sight. 
Bright Eyes, watching, shouts, " I wonder 

If it washed them white ! " 





When You Need 

An Alterative Medicine, don't forget 
that everything depends on the kind 
xised. Ask for Ayer's Sarsaparilla and 
take no other. For over forty years this 
preparation has had the endorsement of 
leading physicians and druggists, and 
it has achieved a success unparalleled 
in the history of proprietary medicines. 

" For a rash, from which I had suf- 
fered some months, my father, an M. D., 
recommended Ayer's Sarsaparilla. It 
effected a cure. I am still taking this 
medicine, as I find it to be a most pow- 
erful blood-purifier." — J. E. Cocke, 
Denton, Texas. 

" C. H. Hut, Druggist, Evansville, 
Did., writes: "I have been selling 
Ayer's Sarsaparilla for many years. It 
maintains its popularity, while many 
other preparations, formerly as well 
known, have long been forgotten." 

"I have always recommended Ayer's 
Sarsaparilla as superior to any other 
preparation for purifying the blood." — ■ 
G. B. Kuykendall, M.'D., Pomeroy.W.T. 

Ayer's Sarsaparilla, 

PREPARED BY 

Dr. J. C. Ayer & Co., Lowell, Mass. 

Price $1 ; six bottles, $5. Worth $5 a bottle. 




'PENGERIAN 
»TEEL PENS 

Are the Best. 



in the essential qualities of Durability , 
Evenness of Points and Workman- 

ship. Sample card containing five leading 
styles of Pens sent for trial, on receipt of re- 
turn postage, 2 cents. Ask for card No, 9. 

IVIS01, BLAKEMAN & CO., 



753 & 755 Broadway, 



New York. 



A little higher in price, but of unrivalled quality, 




'OUR CONSTANT AIM IS TO MAKE THEM THE 
FINEST IN THE WORLD." 



NESTLE'S 




FOOD 

IS ESPECIALLY SUITABLE 



For Infants in Hot Weather. 

Requires No Milk in Its Preparation, 
and is Very Effective in the Pre- 
vention of Cholera-lnfantum. 

" Zienissen's Cyclopedia of tlie practice of Medicine," Vol. 
VII., the standard authority, says ; "In cases of Cholera- 
ln fan turn Nettle's Milk Food is alone to be recom- 
mended." Because the intestinal disorders to which infants 
are so subject are provided for by presenting only the nourish- 
ing properties of cow's milk in a digestible form. 

For twenty years Nestle's Food has been used with great 
success when all other preparations have failed in the "fatal 
heated term." 

There are several infant's food's called " milk foods " which 
are disastrous failures. Ask for and insist on getting 

NESTLE'S FOOD 

if you wish to carry your infant safely through the hot 
weather. Sample sent to any mother on application to 

THOMAS LEEMINC & CO., Sole Agents, 

18 College Place, New York. 




r"Its superior excellence proven in millions of homes for 
more than a quarter of a century. It is used by the United 
States Government. Endorsed by the heads of the Great 
Universities as the Strongest, Purest, and most Healthful. 
Dr. Price's the only Baking Powder that does not contain 
Ammonia, Lime, or Alum. Sold only in Cans. 

PRICE BAK1NCB POWDER CO.,' 

NEW YORK. CHICAGO. ST. LOUIS. 



DURKErs 



GAUNTLET-BRAND 

&*!*<" SPICES 

* MUSTARD. 

SOLD ONLY IN FULL WEIGHT SEALED PACKAGES. 

Guaranteed absolutely pure, and warranted to excel 
ill others in strength, richness, flavor and cleanliness. 




S A LA D 
DRESSING 




CARHMCK'SWOOD 



Perfectly nourishes the child from birth, without the addition of cow's milk, 
and digests as easily as human milk. Send for "Our Baby's First and Second 
Years," by Marion Harland. REED & CARNRICK, New York. 




GOOD 
SENSE 

CORDED CORSET WAISTS. 

Beautifully made of BEST 
MATERIALS throughout. 
THOUSANDS NOW IN USE 
tiyr~ Be sure your Ooraet is 
stamped "Good Sense." 
FIT AXTi AG ES-Infants 
to Adults. Sold by 

" :A1>IN " retailers 

everywhere. Send for circular. 

FERRIS BROS."''"" 1 ' 1 "''"™' 

341 Broadway, New Vork. 



58 



SiiMfcs 



192 Pages; 94 Colored Maps; 60 Colored Diagrams. Contains 
complete Map of every State, Territory, and Country in 
the world, and statistical tables, etc. Flexible covers, gold 
side stamp and red edges. A marvel of cheapness. Sent, post 
paid, to any address for 25 cts. 5 copies for $1. Postage 
stamps taken. 

E. B. GOODNOW & CO., 
Box 1687, BOSTON. MASS. 



PEERLESS DYES 



Are the BEST. 

Sold by Druggists. 



kYS PEPS I A — Its Causes and Cure sent free. By 
t .T. H. McAlvin, Lowell, Mass., 14 years, City Treasurer 



,-; Habla V. Espanol ? 
Parlcz- Vons Franoais? 
Spre chert Sie Pentsch ? 
Parlate Italiano? 



I3JT TZEIST "WDEIE^ZS 

You can, at your own home, by 

Dr. RICHARD S. ROSENTHAL'S MEISTERSCHAFT SYSTEM, 

learn to speak fluently either Spanish, French, Italian or German. 
Speclman Copy, Spanish, French, Ge man, or Italian, 25 Cents. 

All subscribers — $5. 00 for each language — become actual pupils of Dr. Rosenthal, 
who corrects all exercises, and corresponds with them in regard to any difficulties 
which may occur. 



MEISTERSCHAFT PUBLISHING CO., Herald Building, Boston, Mass. 



PHILDREN WILL BRUSH THEIR TEETH 

ff with the Child's Prophylactic Tooth Brush (made of soft bristles and delicate enough for a 1 year 
w I old babe) because it cleans all the teeth so perfectly. Every Dentist urges more care for the first 
^LM teeth, Nothing for cleaning the teeth has ever had tbe world wide endorsements of this brush. 
^^^ Adults use the Prophylactic for natural teeth and The Florence Dental Plate Brush for artificial. 
For children from the age of 7 to 14 a special youths size is made. Descriptive circulars. 

Florence Manufacturing Company, Florence, Mass. 

Adults', Youths', and Childs' sizes kept by all Druggists and Dentists. 



JOSEPH CILLOTO 

STEEL PENS 

Sold By ALL DEALERSThroughoutThe WORLD 
GOLD MEDAL PARIS EXP0SITI0N-I87B. 



WHOOPING COUCH 

40 years' test of Delavau's Remedy proves its merit. Quickly 
dispels the ■whooping, greatly allays and lessens severe parox- 
ysms of coughing — cutting short the disease. Its peculiar 
anti-spasmodic action insures sleep ; and is absolutely harm- 
less in effect. "When physicians' or domestic treatment fail, 
you can rely on "DELAVAU'S." 50c. a bottle. Sold by 
druggists. Depot 6th and "Wood Streets, Philadelphia, Pa. 



INK 



BLACK 



VIOLET 



PINK 



RED 



GREEN 



You can make it yourself withwut the slightest trouble, mul at a 
saving of 200 per cent, vith WALPOLE INK POWDERS, 
■which will yield several quarts of the host Ink in the world. 
Package of either color 25 cents. Liberal discount in large pack- 
ages to parties desiring to make Ink for sale. Uned extensively by 
Schools, Banks, Merchants, and Blank Book Manufacturers. Full 
information by circular, free bv mail. Address. 
WALPOLE DYE AND CHEMICAL COMPANY. 
■» 1 19 Milk St., Boston, Mass., U. S. A. 




GOLD MEDAL, PARIS, 1878. 

BAKER'S 



Warranted absolutely pure 
Cocoa, from -which the excess of 
Oil has been removed. It has three 
times the strength of Cocoa mixed 
with Starch, Arrowroot or Sugar, 
end is therefore far more economi- 
cal, costing less than one cent a 
cup. It is delicious, nourishing, 
strengthening, easily digested, and 
admirably adapted for invalids aa 
well as for persons in health. 
Sold by Grocers eve rywhere. 

W. BAKER & CO., Dorchester, Mass. 

BOYS 

Now'8 your time to get up clubs 
for our celebrated floods and pro- 
cure a Beautiful Watch — 
Stem Winder and Stem 
Setter — Imported Swiss Move- 
ment. Just the watch for hoys. We have in stock a 
large line of premiums for all. For full particulars 
address The Great American Tea Co. 
P. O. Box 289. 31 & 33 Vesey St., New York, N. Y. 

dccdi ecc nvce Ar< ' tbe rest. 

'CEnLEvO If I CO Sold by druggists. 




s pALDING',s 

PREPARED 

\& KB 1£^ BBH# 

The Famous Adhesive of the World. War- 
ranted seven times the strength of 
any other liquid glue. 
It holds like a vice. It mends everything. 

THE STANDARD FOR THIRTY YEARS. 

2-ounce hottle, 25 cents with brush. 
Sold Everywhere. 



o ECKLCOS DTES Sold by druggists'. 




LADY AGENTS ptJUS 

employment at $60 to $100 per 
month selling Queen City Sup- 
porters. Sample outfit free. 
Address Cincinnati Suspender 
Co.,11 E. Ninth St., Cincinnatl.O, 



LADIES' BOOTS 
ONLY $2.00, 

The best for the Money made. 
RETAIL 

EVERYWHERE 
FOR 
$3.00. 

On receipt of Two Dollars we will send you 
by mail, POSTAGE PAID, a pair of these 
Elegant Button Boots, worked button-holes, 
in either kid or goat, or glove-top kid-foxed, 
any size yon want. Give us a trial. Address 

UNITED STATES SUPPLY CO., BOSTON, MASS. 

P. O. Box 3348 or Wesleyan Building:. 

IgF^Eefer to the publishers of this magazine as to 
our reliability. 




CANDY 



Send $1, $2, $3, or $5 for a retail 
box by express of the best candies 
in America, put up elegantly, and 
strictly pure. Suitable for presents. 
.Refers to all Chicago. Address 



GUNIHEK, Confectioner, 313 State St., Chicago. 







IMPERIAL GRANUM, TV. C. "Wile, M. D., in the New England Medical Monthly, January, 
1_J 1888 — " In the delicate conditions of the stomach, when every thing else has been rejected 
3 I have saved many lives by giving Imperial Granum. I consider this as one of the very 
best foods the physician can find to assist him in carrying through his patient to recovery ; and I 
have found it of inestimable value in the later stages of Phthisis, Gastritis, Gastric Catarrh, 
Dyspepsia and Dysentery. It requires little effort of the stomach to digest and I have never 
known it to be rejected if properly prepared, given in small quantities and at frequent intervals. 
The great care used in its manufacture .will lead the physician to expect the same product all the 
time, and we can assure him that he will never be disappointed, as we have fully tested it in our 
extended experience." 

"We speak from experience when we say that the Imperial Granum is both safe and 
nutritious. It has been on the market for many years, and the largely increasing sales show that 
many others have found like results attending its use. — Tlie Christian Union, N. T. 

Asa Medicinal Pood Imperial G ranum, which is simply a solid extract from very superior 
growths of wheat, is unexcelled. It is easy of digestion, is not constipating, and is to-day the 
Standard Dietetic preparation for invalids, for the aged, and for the very young. — North 
American Journal of Homoeopathy, N. Y, Dec, '87. 

Imperial Granum has now been before the public for many years, and is generally admitted 
to be a standard preparation. There can be no doubt that this is due to its uniformly superior 
quality, and the. successful results obtained with it in all cases where an artificial food is 
required. — Popular Science News, Boston, February, '88. 

" Imperial Granum. — A neighbor's child being very low, reduced, in fact, to a mere baby 
skeleton from want of nourishment, as nothing could be found which the child could retain, at the 
urgent request of friends the parents were induced to try Imperial Granum, which proved such a 
benefit to the child it grew and thrived beyond all comprehension. At the same time I had a child 
sick with cholera infantum; on being presented with a box of Granum, with the high recommend 
from this neighbor, used it and continued its use to raise the child on, and I firmly believe this had 
all to do in saving the former child's life and the greater part in restoring my own child to health. 
A. C. G." — Leonard's Illustrated Medical Journal, Detroit, Mich., Oct., '87. 

P. Varnum Mott, M. D., Boston, Mass., in the Microcosm, New York, February, 1886. — 
"There are numerous Poods that are much vaunted, and all have their adherents. The 'Imperial 
Granum,' in my hands, seems to be all that is claimed for it, and experience has brought me to 
rely on its use where its special properties are indicated. In infantile diseases it has proved very 
efficacious, and I always direct its use when a child is being weaned." 

The lives of untold thousands of infants have been saved by Imperial Grauum, and careful 
mothers are loud in their praises of this well known food, and pharmacists can safely recommend 
it. — Proceedings Illinois Pharmaceutal Association, 1887. 

"On some other Planet there may be a better Dietetic Preparation than Imperial Granum, 
but not on this." — " The American Analyst," New York. 



SOLD BY DRUGGISTS. 



JOHN CARLE & SONS, New York- 




A LUXURY FOR SHAVING." 



4- 



■i> 



I 




It is conceded by 
the trade that the 

SNOWBLACK 

are the best black 
Half- Hose in the 
market. They are of 
a fast and unfading 
color, and have the 
advantage, from the 
peculiar method of 
dyeing them, of not 
being tender. They 
are soft and glossy 
and of extra fine tex- 
ture. 

t:h::e 

SNOWBLACK 

AEE 

SHAWKNIC, 

which are the best- 
fitting and most dur- 
jS^He of Half-Hose. 



■> 



/he genuine 
stamped 



art 



s 



SHAWKNIC 

on the toe, and arc 
put up in boxes la- 
belled 

SNOWBLACK. 

For sale by the 
trade generally 
throughout the coun- 
try, and to be obtain- 
ed direct from the 
manufacturers, who 
will send post-paid 

PARCEL PRICE-LIST on 

I application. 

^JTXr STOCKIITG- CO., 



♦ffl- 



■r 



i 



, 



J.,. 




Copyright, 1888, by RusseMi Publishing Company.] fF.ntered at the P. O. at Boston ag second-class matter* 



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CONTENTS. 



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ISADORE'S GOAT Ei 

(Illustrated by Carl Hirschberg.) 

THE SINGING MICE Elizabeth A. Davis . .'. 

(Illustrated by F. S. Church.) 

THE CROW THIEF Katie Kyle 

(Illustrated by A. Kuhler.) 

SEPTEMBER L. B. C 

(Illustrated by Lizbeth B. Comins.) 

THE HELPFUL BOY F. P. Chaplin- 

(Illustrated by L. D. Norton.) 

THE CHICK AND THE DUCK Clara G. Dollivf.r . . . 

(.Illustrated by Carl Hirschberg.) 

FRANKIE'S LETTER No. n Frankie 

(Illustrated by Jessie McDermott.) 

NISSIE AT THE LAKE S. A. E. Crowe 

(Illustrated by A. Buhler.) 

WIND SONGS . , Geo. S. Burleigh .... 

(Illustrated by H. P. Barnes.) 

EVER SO MANY HATS Alice D. Churchill . . . 

(Illustrated by H. M. Ileal.) 

SEPTEMBER , Full-Page Illustration 

(Illustrated by Minnie L. Kirk.) 

FRISKY , Katie Kyle 

(Illustrated by Carl Hirschberg.) 

WHAT I WOULD DO Annie Douglass Bell . . 

(Illustrated by Louis Meynelle.) 

THE YOKED KITTENS . Helen C Larned .... 

(Illustrated by F. T. Merrill.) 



Pagb 
323 

326 

3 2 8 

33 

33 

33' 

33 



333 
340 



34= 
345 
34 r 
343 

35 



The Illustrative Department under the direction of Mr. George T. Andrew. 



OUR LITTLE ONES AND THE NURSERY, 



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ISADORE'S GOAT. 







Copyright, 1888, by Russell Publishing Company. 



No. 11. 



ISIDORE'S GOAT. 



A friend sent my little neighbor, Isadore, a beautiful white 
kid for a playmate. 

It was so gentle and frolicsome that it soon became a great pet, 
and was named Darling. 

By the time Isadore was five years old, Darling had grown to 
be such a big, awkward fellow that Isadore could no longer play 
with him. 

Two short, strong horns had appeared on his forehead, which 
were enough to frighten any one. Darling was always good-natured, 
and used them only in fun. 

He would chase the little Jersey cow all around the lot, and 
drive the old house-dog into his kennel. ' 

People forgot he was named Darling, and began to call him Jumbo. 

Isadore's papa bought a little carriage and harness, and tried to 
teach Jumbo to take the little boy riding ; but the goat was so 
full of pranks it had to be given up. 

When the goat was small he was allowed to go into the house 
with his little master, and he never forgot those days. 

Frequently he alarmed visitors by dashing through the house, 
knocking dewn everything he came near. 

He could run up-stairs as cpiickly and easily as he could clamber 
up a hill-side. 



324 



JSADOBE'S GOAT. 




A number of times he was found sleeping on the best bed . 

At last, Isadore's mamma became so provoked, she said he must 
be got rid of. 

Before he was sold a large package came to Isadore's mamma. 



IS ADO RE'S GOAT. 



325 



all the way from Dakota. When opened it was found to be the head 
of a mountain goat, prepared for an ornament. 

It was placed over the mantel in the hall, above the shelves and 
cabinets full of china and bric-a-brac. 

Soon after it was put in place the family sat down to dinner. 

While they were dining they were startled by a great noise in 
the hall, and the sound of broken glass. 

" Jumbo ! " cried mamma. 

" That confounded goat ! " exclaimed papa. 

Knives and forks were dropped, and every one ran to see what 
was the matter. 

It was Jumbo. 

With broken crockery about the floor, he stood with his fore-feet 
firmly planted on the mantel-shelf. His horns were tightly twisted 
in those of the mountain goat, and he was in a fight with that 
poor, stuffed head, the first of his own kind he had ever seen. 

Jumbo was on board the train that very afternoon, on his way 
to the farm from which he had come. 

He had been so very naughty that nobody was sorry to lose 
him. 

ELLEN L. KNOX. 





THE SINGING MICE. 

A little family of mice 

Lived in a hole as snug and nice 

As ever mice could wish to live. 

They'd plenty, and a grain to give 

To any poorer little mouse 

That chanced to come about the house. 

But one day — 'twas the strangest thing — 

They fancied they must learn to sing ; 

Then such a racket as begun ! 

From early morn till set of sun 

The mother mouse grew wild with dread ; 

She said such actions turned her head, 

That mice were never made to sing, 

And surely 'twould a trouble bring. 

At this the mousies only laughed, 

They thought their mother merely chaffed ; 

But still they sung, and sung, and sung. 

Till every beam and rafter rung, 

And good old farmer Brown declared 

He'd have to have his house repaired: 

" It's old and shaky, and the wind 

Comes searching every crack to find." 



THE SINGWG MICE. 



3^7 



"Not so," then Mistress Brown replied ; 
" It's rats and mice that sneak and hide, 
And keep up such a frightful din 
You'd think the house had tumbled in ; 
But I've a remedy for that, — 
I'll get a good and faithful cat." 
Next morning came, and Mistress Brown 
An early journey took to town, 




Returning with her friend, the cat, 

An animal so sleek and fat 

She looked as though she'd fed on mice, 

Or something else as sweet and nice, 

Her whole life long. And, oh ! her eyes 

So green, so sleepy, and so wise ! 

She crept along the kitchen floor, 

And sniffed at every closet door, 

Across the hall, and through the house, - 

'Twas evident she smelt a mouse ; 



328 



THE CBO 



THIEF. 



At length she disappeared from view — 

What follows now is strictly true — 

Beneath the crazy garret floor 

She found the mice — they numbered four — 

All in their hole, and quite content, 

Unthinking of the punishment 

Their mother said would find them out 

When they began to sing and shout. 

So, little children, give an ear 
When wise ones counsel danger near. 

ELIZABETH A. DAVIS 




THE CROW THIEF. 



Charley Martin had a pet crow, which he called Jet, because he 
was so black. 

Jet was A'ery fond of Charley, and would follow him every chance 
he had. 

Often he would light on Charley's shoulder and go to school with 
him. 

Sometimes, when Charlej' did not want Jet to go with him, he 



THE GROW THIEF. 



329 



shut him up. Jet didn't like to be shut up and would make an awful 
cry. 

The crow had one very bad trick, — he would steal, and hide the 
things in the strangest places. This gave Charley, his mother and 
sister, a great deal of trouble hunting for them. 



A MM 



WJAkLa 




One day Charley's grandma came to visit his mother. After din- 
ner she thought she would have a nap, so she took off her cap and 
laid it upon the table. 

Jet had perched himself in an open window, and was watching 
grandma's cap very closely. He had never seen one before, and new 
things had a great attraction for him. Jet watched till he was alone, 
and then he flew to the table, caught the cap by one of the strings, 



330 



THE CROW THIEF. 




and flew out of the window 
with it. 

When grandma awoke, her 
cap was not to be found anywhere. 
Charley took Jet into a corner, and 
tried to make him understand that 
they knew he had taken it. Unless 
he would show him where he had hidden 
it he would have to go without his 
supper. 

But Jet just winked and blinked his 
eyes, and grandma had to go home with- 
out her cap. 

One day Charley and his little sis- 
ter went to the orchard for apples. 
Charley climbed the tree and shook 
the branches, while his sister held 
her apron to catch the apples as they 
fell. Something white came floating- 
down into her lap. 
What do you think it was? Grandma's cap! Jet had hung 
it on the apple-tree. 

KATIE KYLE. 



<r*l 




§ci>tttvW,5 

£vd F° ur " ^ 

Air it's tresc- 




plv// v U,A\dl°w' 
1 $ r j PACK'S 

of fc>otb' 

pi/rpk &jvd 

Ta3L r<^d v5 
it 5ht eT3 



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HO 

«o 



LffUJ. 1 BY. 



Jimmie Gale's father was a carpenter. One winter, when the 
little boy could not go to .school, he was much of the time in his 
father's shop, and learned how to use many tools. He made a spool- 
box for his mother, a cradle for his sister's doll, and a footstool for 



lame Mrs. Prio-sins. 




In the spring his father made him a little, low wagon. It had 
four wheels and a crank. By turning the crank Jimmie could go 
fast or slow. 



THE HELPFUL BOY. 



333 



'•I feel foolish just to ride all clay." he said; "can't I help some- 
body? " 

" To be .sure.'' answered his wise mother. " To-morrow go and 
visit grandma. See if her door-latches are all in order ; and, if she 



- »': V 1 , 'u . ;!:. JNlJ ZVi» , ' 




needs it, set a pane of glass. You know how, and your lather will 
lend you the tools." 

Jimmie came home singing. He had really helped somebody ! 
Hardly a day went by that he did not do some kind act with his 
tools. Manjr thanks he had from neighbors up and down the road, 
and baskets of fruit for his mother. 

Jimmie's birthday came round in nutting-time. His mother had 



384 



THE (■HICK AND THE DUCK. 



roast chicken and his favorite rice-pudding with raisins. Dear 
grandma and Hetty and baby Nell were all there to enjoy it. 

Jimmie's school-mates came in the evening;. All of a sudden there 
was a loud rap at the door. Nobody was in sight, but on the broad 
step was a box : — 

" Tools for boys," was printed on it. 

On a card was written, — 

" For Jimmie Gale, from his friends up and down the road." 

F. P. CHAPLIN. 



i '"'"^m 




THE CHICK AND THE DUCK. 



Said a downy young duck 
To a fluffy young chick, 
" Come down to the water and swim ! 
Bv a fine bit of luck, 

o J 

The right path I can pick, 
And the horse-trough is full to the brim." 

" I really don't dare ! " 

Was the prudent reply ; 
" I have often been cautioned, you know, 

With the greatest of care, 

To walk where it was dry. 
And with giddy young ducks never go." 



THE CHICK AND THE DUCK. 



335 



She replied with a sneer, 

" To me it is clear, 
To your mother's tail-feathers you're tied ; 

You run at her cluck ! " 

Said this naughty young duck, 
" I don't think you have very much pride." 







The chick hung his head, 

While with blushes he said, 
"I never have learned how to swim, ■ 

You see that by my toe ; 

But I would like to go, — 
I suppose I can walk on the rim." 



"With his thin yellow legs, 
Like long scaly pegs, 



386 



THE CHICK AND THE DUCK. 



He walked on the perilous rim ; 
He watched his friend dive, 
And come up still alive, 

Though she paid no attention to Mm. 




His mother, the hen. 

Ceil led again and again. 
But her darling child never replied. 

With a motion too quick. 

He had slipped. — the poor chick, — 
And he fell in the water, and died. 

CLARA G. DOLLTVER. 




\t» "1 r» " Washington D C September, 

MjEaR Lsjttle Unest 

1 AM GOING TO SCHOOL NOW AND J HAVE A 5PELLING BOOK AND 
A GEOGRAPHY AND* A BIG SLATE AND PENCIL AND A READING BOOK. T CARRY THEM ALL 
IN A BAS EVERY MORNING TO SCHOOL. pET GOES TOO BUT SHE CANT SPELL SUCH 
LONG WORDS AS j DO YET AND SHE. DOESN'T KNOW HOW TO READ AS WELL. WE 
HAVE A NICE CADY TO TEACH US AND WE SING SONGS AND PLAY ALL KINDS OF 
GAMES WITH LONG WANDS AND WOODEN RINGS, Jt IS FUN. AnNIE COMES FOR US 

ATS.TWELVE O'CLOCK AND , TAKES US HOME. pET DOESN'T LIKE TO STUDY HEP, LES- 
SONS AND SHE SAYS SHE IS SORRY SHE™ GROWN OLD ENOUGH TO GO TO SCHOOL. TJv\ 
NOT. J WANT TO BE TWELVE YEARS OLD. 'ThEN T CAN HAVE A REAL BICYCLE AND 
THEN J CAN STRAP MY BOOKS ON BEHIND AND RIDE TO SCHOOL ON IT EVERY MORN- 
ING. pET SAYS 6HE IS GOING TO HAVE A BICYCLE™ BtJTGIRLS DONT RIDE. ON BICYCLES.' 
)\/OW WE WALK TO SCHOOL WITH p\NN\(. EVERY DAY "pERE ARE THREE OTHER LIT- 
TLE BOYS AND FIVE LITTLE GIRLS IN MY CLASS AND J AM NEXT TO THE HEAD IN READ-! 
ING AND THERE ARE THREE ABOVE ME IN SPELLING. J AM GOING TO BE AT THE 
HEAD OF THE CLASS ONE OF THESE DAYS. PET IS AT THE FOOT OF HER SPELLING 
CLASS. f^AMMA IS GOING TO 6H0W MlE HOW TO BOUND (MASSACHUSETTS WHICH IS 
MY GEOGRAPHY LESSON FCH TOMORROW 50 J MUST STOP NOW AND GO TO HER. 
(iOODBYE TILL NEXT MONTH. (JOUR. LITTLE FRIEND, 

F^ANKIE. 



i» | i >jui) , ww Bl 



MMimmmmiwmKfWfmMmmmtwim 



NISSIE AT THE LAKE. 

• It was one day in the early summer that Nissie began to have 
a queer little cough. At first her mamma thought it was only 
a cold her baby had taken. She gave her a few doses of medicine, 
hoping that her little one would be well in a day or two. The 
remedy did not prove to be what Nissie needed, and her mamma 
decided it was best to see the doctor. He said the little girl was 
taking that dreaded disease so many other little ones had in the 
same city, — whooping-cough. He declared that a change of air was 




the very best thing for the little invalid, and her mamma took her 
to the lake one day. 

It was ever so nice, Nissie thought, to run along in the white sand, 
throw stones, and watch the water dash up and see the bubbles 
disappear. 

All at once one of the largest waves came rolling in so fast that 
Nissie did not see it. Away slipped the smooth sand from under 
her little feet. When her mamma looked around, the child was 
sitting down in the water, dripping wet. 

Now, what was to be done with a sick baby, ever so many miles 
from home, in wet clothes ? At last her little coat was thought of. 



NISSIE AT THE LAKE. 



339 



The wet garments were removed, the little girl was wrapped in the 
coat, and put down on the warm, dry sand. Here she had a nice 




time digging wells and building forts, till the warm sun dried her 
clothes. Then she was dressed again, and after watching the children 
for a while flying past in the merry-go-round she went home all 
the better for her wetting in the lake. 

s. A. E. CROWE. 



WIND SONGS. 



341 





Poor Robbie ! he could not go out with mamma because 
that horrid dog, Don, had chewed up his hat ! To be sure, he 
had thought it great fun yesterday, when Don had it between 
his teeth, and had even helped him to spoil the hat. Then he 
had been very happy this morning when he heard mamma tell 
papa to get him a new one. Now, when she had gone out with 
Auntie May, and left him at home, it did not seem either funny 
or nice. Mamma felt sorry to leave her little boy behind, but, 
still, she thought it would teach him to be more careful in the 
future. 

Mamma and auntie went first to papa's office, but found he 
had been suddenly called out of town for the day. Mamma, 
thinking he would forget about the hat, went to a store (after 
Auntie May had started for home), and bought Robbie a pretty 
new one. 

On her way home, however, Auntie May, thinking of Robbie's 
disappointment, for a surprise bought him a hat, which she or- 
dered to be sent immediately. 

In the meantime, grandpa, from the next room, heard Robbie 
crying, and came in to see what was the matter, and Robbie 



EVER SO MANY HATS. 



343 



told him the whole story. Grandpa was very sorry for him. 
Telling him not to cry, for he should have a hat, he went to 
buy him one. On his way to the store, meeting Uncle Ed, he 

told him about it ; and he, also, bought Robbie a hat. 

i 




At noon, when mamma came home with her new hat, thinking 
how pleased Robbie would be, she saw him playing in the yard, 
with one on his head ; so she called him, and asked if papa had 
come home and bought the hat. He told her no ; that Uncle Ed 
had given it to him, and there were two more in the house from 
Auntie May and grandpa. 



344 



EVER SO MANY HATS. 



"And I have brought you one, too!" said mamma. "I think, 
now. you will have enough." 

She put them all away except one, and when papa came home 




started to tell him the story. He interrupted her by bringing 
in the hat which she told him to get. 

So Robbie had five hats instead of one ; and, as Don was never 
allowed to touch any of them, they lasted a long time. 






ALICE D. CHURCHILL. 




SEPTEMBER. 



FRISKY. 

Katie lived in the country. She had a great many pets that she 
wouldn't have had, had she lived in the city. The one she loved best 
was a little lamb her papa gave her for her very own. She named 
him Frisky, because he was so playful, and would skip and jump all 
clay long. Katie tied a yellow ribbon around his neck with a pretty 
bow on top. The yellow was very bright and pretty in the green 
field. 




Once a week Katie would give Frisky a bath in a tub, and scrub 
him with soap and a brush. This kept his wool very white and soft 
and curly. 



FRISKY. 



347 



One day Katie had some little friends to see her. She took them 
in the field to play with Frisky, but when they went back to the 




house Katie forgot to put up the bars again. Frisky wandered out of 
the field and got lost. 

Katie did not miss Frisky till after her little friends had gone, 
when she went to the field to give Frisky his supper. Then she 
found the bars down and no Frisky in the field. How badly she felt ! 
She began to call loudly, " Frisky ! " " Frisky ! " but Frisky was far 



348 



WHAT I WOULD DO. 



away and didn't hear her. Then she ran to the house and found her 
brother Harry, and they both went in search of Frisky. They walked 
till they were both tired. It was getting dark, and Harry said they 
must turn back homeward. But Katie coaxed, " Harry, let's go 
just a wee bit farther ; I think we shall find him." They hadn't gone 
far when they heard a familiar little bleat. Katie bounded ahead, 
and found Frisky l}'ing by the roadside. She was so glad to see him 
she cried for joy. Poor Frisky was so weak after his long walk that 
Harry had to carry him home. 

Katie never forgot to put back the bars again. She used to laugh 
and say, " Frisky won't let me forget, for he always runs after me, 
saying, ' Bar ! ' ' bar ! ' though he spells it Baa." 

KATIE KYLE. 




WHAT I WOULD DO. 



If I were a rose 
On the garden wall, 
I'd look so fair. 
And grow so tall ; 
I'd scatter perfume far and wide, 
Of all the flowers be the pride. 
That's what I'd do 
If I were you, 
little rose! 




WHAT I WOULD DO. 



350 WHAT I WOULD DO. 

If I were a bird, 

With a nest in a tree, 

I would sing a song 

So glad and free, 
That birds in gilded cages near 
Would pause my wild, sweet notes to hear. 

That's what I'd do 

If I were you, 

gay wild bird ! 



Fair little maid, 
If I were you, 
I should always try 
To be good and true ; 
I'd be the merriest, sweetest child 
On whom the sunshine ever smiled. 
That's what I'd do 
If I were you, 
Dear little maid ! 



ANNIE DOUGLAS BELL. 




THE YOKED KITTENS. 

I suppose there never was a little girl who had such an odd doll's 
carriage, or such a queer pair of ponies to drag it, as Flossie had. 
Her brother Tom had made a little yoke, all by himself, just like the 
big yokes they use to work oxen. 

When it was finished he put it on the two little black and white 
kittens, who were so much alike you could scarcely tell one from the 




other. After training them every clay for a week, so they would pull 
together, and not try to get their heads out of the yoke, he hitched 
them into a small ox-cart John, the coachman, had made for him. 

Then Flossie lent him her black doll, Pompey, to stand up in front 
and drive. Of course Tom really drove them himself, and walked 
beside them to see that they kept in the path. 

As an ox-cart has no seats, the dolls were placed side by side in the 
bottom. Fixed in this way, one pleasant day, Antoinette, the French 
doll, and Jason, with large blue eyes and long golden hair, started 
out for a drive. 



THE YOKED KITTENS. 



When they started, a big 
gate, straight towards 
party. Flossie and 
all their might tow- 
The little kittens, 
most to death, 
first tree, and 
with the wagon 
heels. 

The noise 
the coachman, 
trembling;, lit- 
stable. 




black dog bounded through the 
the happy little 
Tom ran with 
ards the house, 
frightened al- 
darted up the 
began to climb, 
dangling at their 

brought out John, 
who took the poor, 
tie kittens to the 
picked up the doll- 
Antoinette had lost 
and Jason's head was 
but Pompey seemed 
as fresh as when 
they started on 
the drive. 

HELEN C. LAKNED. 






The Lady 

Who has fine Hair, and desires to pre- 
serve its color, abundance, and lustre, 
should use Ayer's Hair Vigor as a 

dressing. It keeps the scalp clean and 
cool, and is by far the most exquisite 
toilet preparation in the market. 

B. M. Johnson, M. D., Thomas Hill, 
Mo., says: "I have used Ayer's Hair 
Vigor in my family for a number of 
years, and regard it as the best hair 
preparation I know of. It keeps the 
scalp clean, the hair soft and lively, and 
preserves the original color. My wife 
has used it for a long time with most 
satisfactory results." 

Mrs. S. A. Rock, of Anderson, Texas, 
writes : " At the age of 34, in Monroe, 
La., I had a severe attack of swamp, or 
malarial, fever. After I got well my 
hair commenced coming out, and so con- 
tinued until it had well nigh all gone. 
I used several kinds of hair restorers, 
but they did no good. A friend gave me 
a bottle of Ayer's Hair Vigor. Before 
finishing the first bottle my hair began 
to grow, and by the time I used three 
bottles, I had a fine head of hair." 

Ayer's Hair Vigor, 

PREPARED BY 

Dr. J. C. Ayer & Co., Lowell, Mass. 

Sold by Druggists and Perfumers. 



DURKErS 



G AU NT1XTLBRANO. 

* MUSTARD. 

SOLD ONLY IN FULL WEIGHT SEALED PACKAGES.'* 
Guaranteed absolutely pure, and warranted to excel 
all others in strength, richness, flavor and cleanliness. 




SALAD 
DRESSING 





TENGERIAN 
•TEEL PENS 

Are the Best. 



in the essential qualities of Durability, 
Evenness of Points and Workman- 
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styles of Pens sent for trial, on receipt of re- 
turn postage, 2 cents. Ask for card No. 9. 

IVISOH, BLABIAN & CO., 



753 & 755 Broadway, 



New York. 



NESTLES 




FOOD 

IS ESPECIALLY SUITABLE 



For Infants in Hot Weather. 

Requires No Milk in Its Preparation, 
and is Very Effective in the Pre- 
vention of Cholera-lnfantum. 

" Ziemssen's Cyclopedia of the practice of Medicine, "Vol. 
VII., the standard authority, says : " In cases of Cholera- 
lnfantum Nestle's Milk Food is alone to be recom- 
mended." Because the intestinal disorders to which infants 
are so subject are provided for by presenting only the nourish- 
ing properties of cow's milk in a digestible form. 

For twenty years Nestle's Food has been used wifh great 
success when all other preparations have failed in the " fatal 
heated term." 

There are several infant's food's called " milk foods " which 
are disastrous failures. Ask for and insist on getting 

NESTLE'S FOOD 

If you wish to carry your infant safely through the hot 
weather. Sample sent to any mother on application to 

THOMAS LEEMING &. CO., Sole Agents, 
18 College Place, New York. 



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Parlez - Vons Francais ? 
Sprechen Sie Peutsch ? 
Parlate Italiano? 



You can, at your own home, by 

Dr. RICHAKD S. ROSENTHAL'S MEISTERSCHAFT SYSTEM, 

learn to speak fluently either Spanish, French, Italian or German. 

Speciman Copy, Spanish, French, Ge man, or Italian, 25 Cents. 

All subscribers — So.OOfor each language — become actual pupils of Dr. Rosenthal, 
who corrects all exercises, and corresponds with them in regard to any difficulties 
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MEISTERSCHAFT PUBLISHING CO., Herald Building, Boston, Mass. 



WEBSTER 




BROWN'S FRENCH DRESSING. 

The Original. Beware of Imitations. 
PARIS MEDAL ON EVERY BOTTLE 



3000 more Words and nearly 2000 more Illus- 
trations than any other American Dictionary- 

Among the supplementary features, unequaled 
for concise and trustworthy in formation, are. 

A Biographical Dictionary 

giving brief farts coneerning 9,700 _ Noted Per- 
sons of ancient and modern ximes, 

A Gazetteer of the World 

locating and describing 25,000 Places; and a Vo- 
cabulary of the names of Noted 

Fictitious Persons and Places. 

The latter is not found in any other Dictionary. 

Webster excels in SYNONYMS which are appro- 
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Sold by all Booksellers. Pamphlet free. 

G.& C. MERR1AM &. CO., Pub'rs, Springfield, Mass. 



TO SUBSCRIBERS OF 

Our Little Ones 

AND THE NURSERY. 




WE have had inquiries for a Binder for our Magazine, 
and to enable us to meet the wants of our subscri- 
bers, we have had manufactured a supply of the Common 
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find to be the best in use. Those furnished by us are in 
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ings being the same as the bound volume. In this Bind- 
er the numbers of the Magazine can be placed each 
month as fast as thev are received, thus making a bound 
book all the year. Having had a large number of these 
Binders made, we can offer them at one-third less than 
the regular retail price, and every reader of Our Littli. 
Ones should have one. 

Price, 50 cents, postage paid. 



RUSSELL PUBLISHING COMPANY, 

36 Bromfif.i.d Street, Boston, Mass. 




6iI|HMhI 



AWARDED HIGHEST PRIZE AND ONLY 

MEDAL PARIS EXPOSITION, 1878. 

HIGHEST AWARD, NEW ORLEANS EXPOSITION. 
Against all Competitors. 



PcEnLtSS DTES sold by druggists'. 



I YS PEPS I A — Its Causes and Cure sent free. By 
" J. H. McAlvin, Lowell, Mass., 14 years, City Treasurer. 



BOSTON BUREAU OF ADVERTISING, 

36 BROMFIELD ST., Boston, Mass. 




Magazine, 

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Specialty Advertising. 

Advertisements inserted in any 
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Bound volumes " /*»TJ A T'TTD 15 f\V " and other 
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"HOUSEHOLD," "COTTACE HEARTH," 
" BABYHOOD," AND 
"COOD HOUSEKEEPING." k 

Correspondence solicited and estimates furnished for any 
desired line of advertising. 

GEORGE A. FOXOROFT, 

Manager, 



PHILDREN WILL BRUSH THEIR TEETH 

U with the Chilli's Prophylactic Tooth Brush (made of soft bristles and delicate enough for a 1 year 
■ I old babe) because it cleans all the teeth so perfectly. Every Dentist urges more care for the first 
^Lm teeth. Nothing for cleaning the teeth has ever had the world wide endorsements of this brush. 
^^ Adults use the Prophylactic for natural teeth and The Florence Dental Plate Brush for artificial. 
For children from the age of 7 to 14 a special youths size is made. Descriptive circulars. 

Florence Manufacturing Company, Florence, Mass. 

Adults', Youths', and Childs' sizes kept by all Druggists and Dentists. 



JOSEPH CI LLOTtS 

STEEL PENS 

Solo By ALL DEALERSThroughoutThe WO R LD 
GOLD MEDAL PARIS EXP0SITION-I878. 



WHOOPING COUCH 

40 years' test of Delavau's Remedy proves its merit. Quickly 
lispels the whooping, greatly allays and lessens severe parox- 
ysms of coughing — cutting short the disease. Its peculiar 
anti-spasmodic action insures sleep ; and is absolutely harm- 
less in effect. "When physicians' or domestic treatment fail, 
you can rely on "DELAVAU'S." 50c. a bottle. Sold by 
druggists. Depot 6th and "Wood Streets, Philadelphia, Pa. 



INK 



BLACK ; VIOLET* 



PINK | REP | GREEN 



You can make it yourself without the slightest trouble, and at a 
saving of 200 per cent, with 'WALPOLB INK POWDERS, 
which will yield Beveral quarts of the beat Ink in the world. 
Package of either color 25 cents. Liberal discount in large pack- 
ages to parties desiring to make Ink for sale. Used extensively by 
Schools, Banks, Merchants, and Blank Bouk Manufacturers. Full 
information by circular, free by mail. Address. 
WALPOLE DYE AND CHEMICAL COMPANY, 
j* I 19 Milk St.. Boston, Mass., U.S. A. 




GOLD MEDAL, PARIS, 1878. 

BAKER'S 



Warranted absolutely pure 
Cocoa, from -which the excess of 
Oil has been removed. It has three 
times the strength of Cocoa mixed 
with Starch, Arrowroot or Sugar, 
and is therefore far more economi- 
cal, costing leas than one cent a 
cup. It is delicious, nourishing, 
strengthening, easily digested, and 
admirably adapted for invalids aa 
well as for persons in health. 
Sold by Grocers eve rywhere. 

V. BAKER S CO., Dorchester, Mass. 



** PREPARED 

GLUE. 

The Famous Adhesive of the World. War- 
ranted seven times the strength of 
any other liquid glue. 
// holds like a vice. It mends everything. 

THE STANDARD FOR THIRTY YEARS. 

2-ounce bottle, 25 cents with brush. 

Sold Everywhere. 

dccpi est nvce Ar< ' <>'<• best. 

rCEIILEOV UIEO Sold by Druggists. 



LADY AGENTS "SJSS 

employment at $50 to $100 per 
month selling Queen City Sup- 
porters. Sample outfit free. 
Address Cincinnati Suspender 
Co.,11 E.Ninth St.,Cincinnati,0, 





OYS 



Now's your time to get up clubs 
for our celebrated goods and pro- 
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Stem Winder and stem 

Setter — Imported Swiss Move- 
ment. Just tile watch for boys. We have in stock a 
large line of premiums for all. For full particulars 
address The Grea* American Tea Co. 

P. O. Box 289. 31 & 33 Vesey St., New York, N. Y. 

dccdi eee nvce a™ the best. 

rCEnLCOO UIEO Sold by Druggists. 



LADIES' BOOTS 
ONLY $2.00. 

The best for the Money made. 
RETAIL 

EVERYWHERE 
FOR 
$3.00. 

On receipt of Two Dollars we will send you 
by mail, POSTAGE PAID, a pair of these 
Elegant Button Boots, worked button-holes, 
in either kid or goat, or glove-top kid-foxed, 
any size you want. Give us a trial. Address 

UNITED STATES SUPPLY CO., BOSTON, MASS. 

P. O. Box 3348 or Wesleyan Building. 

B3P"Refer to the publishers of this magazine as to 
our reliability. 




CANDY 



Send $1, $2, S3, or $5 for a retail 
box by express or tbe best candies 
in America, put up elegantly, and 
strictly pure. Suitable for presents. 
Refers to all Chicago. Address 



GUNrHEE, Confectioner, 212 State St., Chicago. 



COMPARATIVE WORTH of BAKING POWDERS. 

ROYAL pure) nHEBHHBBBmSHIHGHS&EISKXHBBfl 

RUMFORD'S, when fresh. . ■aHHBHHBHHSHHHSHm 
HANFORD'S, when riv<i>...,BHB9HHBBHBHi 
REDHEAD'S HamamBBHunnB 

! > .in I !n' l »....BBHHBHBHBBi 
.11 A /ON , Aium # . . .■■HBSi^nMBBHBHHB 

DAMS', O.K. BBHH^BHBHHHMB 

New York, (Alum Powders. )-J; 

CLEVELAND'S ' .---HmHsaHHmHBB 

PIONEEP. Fraiieise(»...BBHHHBHB 

CZAR 

DR. PRICE'S 

SNOW FLAKE (Graff's)... 
LEWIS' 

PEARL (Andrews & Co.). . . . 

HECKER'S 

GILLET'S 

ANDREWS & CO. "Regal' 

Milwaukee, (Contains Alum). 

RUMFO RD'S, when not fresh M 

REPORTS OF GOVERNMENT CHEMISTS 

As to Purity and Wholesomeness of the Royal Baking- Powder. 

"I have tested a package of Royal Baking Powder, which I purchased in the 
open market, and find it composed of pure aud wholesome ingredients. It is a cream 
of tartar powder of a high degree of merit, and does not contain either alum or 
phosphates, or other injurious substances. E. G. Love, Ph.D. 

"It is a scientific fact that the Royal Baking Powder is absolutely pure. The 
Royal Baking Powder is undoubtedly the purest and most reliable baking powder 
offered to the public. H. A. JIott, Ph. D. 

"The Royal Baking Powder is purest in quality and highest in strength of any 
baking powder of which I have knowledge. Wji. McMubtrie, Ph.D. 




The Royal Baking Powder received the highest award over all competitors at 
the Vienna World's Exposition, 1873 ; at the Centennial, Philadelphia, 1876 ; at the 
American Institute, New York, and at State Fairs throughout the country. 

No other article of human food has ever received such high, emphatic, and uni- 
versal endorsement? from eminent chemists, physicians, scientists and Boards of 
Health all over the world. 

Note. — The above Diagram illustrates the comparative worth of various Baking 
Powders, as shown by Chemical Analysis and experiments made by Prof. Schedler. 
A pound can of each powder was taken, the total eavening power or volume in 
each can calculated, the result being as indicated. This practical test for worth by 
Prof. Schedler only proves what every observant consumer of the Royal Baking 
Powder knows by practical experience, that, while it costs a few cents per pound 
more than ordinary kinds, it is far more economical, besides affording the advant- J 
age of better work. A single trial of the Royal Baking Powder will convince any , I 
fair minded person of fhese facts. 

* While the diagram shows some of the alum powders to be of a comparatively i-> 
high degree of strength, it is not to be taken as indicating that they have any value. 
All alum powders, no matter how high their strength, are to be avoided as dangerous I 



questionably a£«^ as 4 % u" 
a ^d trebly && ^ey are doubly 
skm of t^ go us to the delicatf 
but Pears' Soar, £ nd young- child 
mended by ?£> f« US S d awS 
gent mothers te ands of intelh- 
ihzed world Wo^bont the civ 
» a dSrSf^a while serving 
emollient nm^ and cleanser itf 
*f n g l n f °a^ s f Prevent"' thl 

^W E 8 *? ffia 1 * WhiCh 

PILET SOAPS °r+ mical of all 
mness of a w^f er h fl ^ ars to **» 



*$• 



■i» 




*m- 



'<* 




[Copyright 1888, by Kisskli. Publishing Company.] [Entered at the P. O. at Boston as second-class matter.] 



CONTENTS. 



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" 



MISS FLIPPETTY FLOP-PET Emma L. Cass 

(Illustrated by Carl Hirschberg.) 

A CURIOUS TRAVELLER Julia P. Ballard . . . 

(Illustrated by A. Buhler.) 

A PIECE OF SPONGE Mrs. G. Hall 

(Illustrated by A. Buhler.) 

BUILDING A ROCKERY R. W. Lowrie 

(Illustrated by Miss K. S. Tucker.) 

THE BASKET BOY Pink Hunter 

(Illustrated by H. W. Tucker.) 

ROBBY IN THE TUNNEL Ellen L. Knox .... 

(Illustrated by H. M. Beal.) 

ONLY A CRICKET CHIRPING AWAY . . . Elizabeth A. Davis , . 

(Illustrated by Parker Hayden.) 

FRANKIE'S LETTER No. 12 Frankie 

(Illustrated by Jessie McDermott.) 

MRS. BUSSFUSS'S PARTY Louise Thrush 

(Illustrated by Carl Hirschberg.) 

OCTOBER ' L. B. C 

(Illustrated by Lizbeih U. Comins.) 

HOW GEORGE RAN AWAY C. Emma Cheney . . . 

(Illustrated by L. H. Burr.) 

PATTY AND THE BUTTERFLY Aunt Olive 

(Illustrated by H. P. Barnes.) 

BESS Robert Ogden Fowler 

(Illustrated by Louis Meyuelle.) 

WHAT INSECTS ARE GOOD FOR Mrs. G. Hali • 

(Illustrated by Parker Hayden.) 

BUMBLE-BEES Marion Douglas . . . 

(Illustrated by H. P. Barnes.) 

AUTUMN Full-Pace Illustration 

(Illustrated by Miss E. S. Tucker.) 



TAti 
35 

35<j 

35 

3<; 
3^ 
36J 

3'3i 

359 
37o| 



374 
377 
37S 
380 
382 
384 



The Illustrative Department under tiie direction of Mr. George T. Andrew. 

OUR LITTLE ONES AND THE NURSERY, 



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CLEANFAST-BLACK STOCKINGS 



(F. P. ROBINSON CO. DYE. ) 
For Men, Women and Children. Money refunded if they stain or fade. 

THE CLEANFAST HOSIERY CO., 

ftff Broadway owl 2 West 14tb Street, New York ; 107 Statu Street, Chicago. 

*4i) "West Street, Boston. 




MISS FLIPPETTY FLOPPET. 



To 




Vol. VIII. 



1SSS 

Copyright, 1888, by Russell Publishing Company. 



No. 12. 



MISS FLIPPETTY FLOPPET. 

Miss Flippetty Floppet, a maiden of five, 

As playful as any young monkey alive, 

I'm just going to tell you about what she did : 

She spied grandma's band-box, — she took off the lid, 

And what should she see but a new Sunday bonnet ; 

'Twas quite to her taste, so she thought she would don it. 

She prinked it up high, then she smoothed it down flat, 

'Twas a shocking bad fit, but she didn't mind that ; 

"And now I must get me a tall, growed-up dwess, 

Aunt Belle's is as pretty as any, I guess." 

And so on it went — it was glossy and fine, 

Oh ! with such a lono; train, and as red as red wine ! 



" Now, with grandpapa's speckles, and grandma's mankilla, 
I'll make two free calls with my dolly, Priscilla." 
Just then grandmamma came to look for her pet, 
And the sight that she saw, she will not soon forget ; 
No wonder, — just fancy this mite of a maid, 
In spectacles, bonnet, and long gown arrayed ! 

EMMA M. CASS. 




TV* 



21 



To 



" I tiiixk vour grasses are almost 
prettier than your flowers," said little 
Flora, as she watched her sister arrang- 
ing her " wood treasures " after a drive 
to the South woods. " You always find 
so many odd things, too." 

" Like these brown balls," said Helen. 
smiling, as she held up some curious 
oak-balls ; " these have little insects shut up in them, that will 
come walking out some bright day." 

" Oh ! " exclaimed Flora, suddenly, " your grasses aren't waiting 
for some fine day. See ! One of them is walking off, truly and 
really ! " 




ji » 



' IT S \V^ 




I ,. ■ f * 



;■',:■ ii 



A CURIOUS TRAVELER. 



Sure enough, there it went, a 



: ' walking-stick " in earnest. 



357 

But 

the " stick " had life of a different kind from the rest of the sticks, 
and Flora and Helen both laughed as they watched the curious 
walker, lifting one little stem and then another, and putting them 
down slowly as it stepped along on the table among the grasses and 
golden-rod. 

"Oh, one little branch is broken off!" said Flora. And she was 
right. One of the six " little branches " was missing. One straight 
stem, five branches, and two very delicate long twigs were all this 
" Walking-stick " could boast. So this is the way he looked. 




Helen looked at him very carefully with her microscope. " The 
joints look just like the joints of rushes," she said. " There is the 
head and then twelve more parts in all, to the body. The lower 
half of the long legs has four or five little joints, counting from the 
foot. The eyes are the funniest things about it. You can only see a 
round rim, just like a knob on the grasses. If there is a bright eye, 
that sees, it is so far in that I can't find it with my microscope." 

" It would not be easy to find these walkers," said Flora. 



358 



A PIECE OF SPONGE. 



"No," said Helen, "I do not believe yon could by limiting for 
them. We should not have seen this if it had kept still. There are 
a good many insects that are protected, by looking almost exactl}' 
like the bush or tree on which they live, and this is surely one." 

" I'm sorry if we knocked off that one branch," said Flora ; " but 
he seems to get on pretty well without it." 

" He shall have an airing in my fernery," said Helen, as she lifted 
off the glass shade and with a stick carefully lifted the five-branched 
walker on to some tiny plants and mosses. 

" Only see a stick eat! " said Flora, as they both watched the curious 
mouth open and shut, sucking the juices from a slice of ripe pear. 

And if you could peep into Helen's fernery you might see him 
now, taking a nap after his dinner from the pulp of a Concord grape. 

JULIA P. BALLARD. 




A PIECE OF SPONGE. 

Did you ever look at a piece of spong'e and see what a 
curious thing it is ? Do you know by whom it was made ? One 
of Nature's smallest children did it. It was once alive and stow- 
ing on the rocks in some of the far-away seas. It lived, breathed, 
and grew just as you do. 

Some sponges are like round cups. Some are like branches 
of trees. Others are thin, and spread out like a fan. They 
are of almost every color, from orange to a dingy brown. 
When they are on the beautiful floor of the ocean, with seaweed 
and fish all about, they are veiy pretty. 



A PIECE OF SPONGE. 



859 



As long as the sponges are alive it is not easy to catch them. 
They can only be torn from the rocks by men called " divers," 
who, for the sake of getting the little skeleton, destroy the creat- 
ure itself. All sponge animals cannot build a " toilet sponge," for 
that is the kind you al- 
ways use. You know 
how full of holes all 
sponges are. Well, if 
there were not a fresh 
supply of water, full 
of living things, all 
the time passing- 
through these queer 
holes, these little creat- 
ures could not live a 
moment. This is all 
done by little whip- 
like hairs inside their bodies, which 
move to and fro, and do all the 
work and do it well. 

You must examine your piece of 
sponge after what I have told you, 
and see if you can tell how strangely 
it is made ! There are many common 
kinds, but we use the very best lor 
bathing. 






BUILDING A ROCKERY. 

We're building a rockery, Susie and I, 

Of pebble, of moss, and of shell ; 
We've chosen a place quite under the shade, 

And close by the old-fashioned well. 

We plan it, we build it, we tear it all clown ; 

As busy as beavers or bees ; 
We're brown as the berries, and hearty and hale, 

And happy as sailors on seas. 

And the days are as short as the days well can be ; 

And Susie is lovely and dear ; 
I wish every day and I wish every hour, 

'Twere summer the whole of the year. 



For we're building a rockery, Susie and I, 

Of pebble, of moss, and of shell ; 
And the loveliest of ferns, and grasses, and vines 

Shall grow by the old-fashioned well. 

k. w. LOWRIE. 




THE BASKET BOY. 



Frank Smith is a little boy, so lame from rheumatism that he 
cannot walk without crutches. He makes baskets with strips of 
white oak, and sells them to his neighbors. 

When he has made a great many, his father lends him his buggy 
and horse to take his baskets around, and so he is called the " basket 
boy." 

One day he met a woman driving a pig home, and with her apron 
full of apples. She held a long string in one hand, the end being 
fastened around the pig's neck, but he ran from one side of the road 
to the other, and gave her much trouble. Frank felt sorry for her, 
and handed her one of his baskets. 



THE BASKET BOY. 



363 



" Take this," he said, " and put the apples into it. Then you can 
carry them on your arm, and manage the pig better." 




The woman thanked him a thousand times, and Frank was as 
much pleased as if he had sold his basket. 

Some days afterwards the same woman brought him a dozen fresh 
eggs and as many large red apples. 

PINK HUNTER. 




One day the Horticultural Society met at our 
house. 

Robby came ; he was just as big as I, only fatter, 
and I was four and a half. 

Robby's papa made a speech ; it was not a nice 

story at all, so Robby and I went out to dig a well. 

The ground was so hard we could not dig a very 

deep well. We rolled some big sewerpipes clown that were just 

as tall as I was, and awful big around. 

Robby said, " Come on, Oscar, let's put them in a line and play 
tunnel ! " 

There were six of them. I went into the tunnel first ; but it was 
not so much fun as I thought. I tried to back out, but I couldn't. 
Somehow, when I drew my elbows up to push, I was too big. 




BOBBY IN THE TUNNEL. 



365 



It was awful dark in there, and I cried ; but I could not wipe 
my eyes, 'cause there wasn't room. 

I believed I'd never get out, it was so long, and so dark, 
and so tight. I yelled, too ; but I guess nobody heard me. When 
I got out I hollowed, I tell you. 

And then I looked for Robby. He was not getting along 
very fast. He was in the very first piece of the tunnel, and 
could not get out. He was too fat. 




I rolled the next piece of the tunnel away, and scratched 
Robby's face, for he had just got his head into it. When I asked 
him why he didn't come out, he screamed out that " he was 
stuck." 

When I took hold of his feet and pulled, he hollowed so I got 
scared, and ran in to call his mother. 

Robby's papa was still reading, but I did not care. I just 
called as loud as I could : " Come out here, Robby's stuck in the 
tunnel ! " 



366 



BOBBY IN THE TUNNEL. 



Robby's mother just gave one scream and ran out. My 
mamma ran, too. 

When we got out there Robby was still yelling. He looked 
just like a turtle, with his face all red, and black, and spotty, 
sticking out at one end, and his muddy feet, kicking as much 
as they coald at the other. 




His mother just cried ; but my ma got down and pulled off 
his dirty boots. My ! what faces she made ! 

And then he slid through just as easy! 

He was so dirty he had to have on one of my suits ; and 
it was so tight for him I thought the buttons would burst off. 
His face kept getting redder all the time. 

I wanted to take him to my play-room to plaj^ blocks and 
things, but they made us sit in the parlor till the folks went 
home. It was so hot tbere that I fell asleep, and that is all 
I can remember. 

ELLEN L. KNOX. 




ONLY A CRICKET CHIRPING AWAY. 



I'm only a cricket chirping away, 

In the fading light of an autumn day. 

When the flowers are dead, and the grasses dry, 

And the shrill, bleak winds go whistling by, — 

Then I sing my song with a louder cheer, 



For I know old Winter's hovering near. 



368 



ONLY A CRICKET CHIRPING AWAY. 




ll..-tt?iV*?*S, 



I sing of the fireside's calm delight, 

When friends draw near with the lamps alight ; 

And I tell my tales in the humblest cot, 

And sing of the joys that are half forgot. 

For though only a cricket chirping away, 

In the fading light of an autumn day. 

I come and go with my song of cheer. 

To hush the cry of the dying year. 



ELIZABETH A. DAVIS. 




sty? 



JJEP^llP 




^shinstonI). C. October 

~ > TLe0nES ' As soon as T HAVE FINISHED THIS LETTER Hrt * TeTTE,' 

She always gets us something nice— ice-cream soda water maybe or perhaps 

SOME BUTTERCUP CANDIES AT }{uYLERS STORE. SHE LET3 US LOOK IN THE WIN- 
DOWS Of STORES AND TELLS US ABOUT THE PICTURES WE SEE IN THEM. UNE DAY 
SHE LE.T ME CHOOSE A SILVER THIMBLE FOR A BIRTHDAY PRESENT FOR /1MNIE. 
-TNEHE WAS A WHOLE BLACK VELVET TRAY FULL OF THEM AND IT WAS HARD TO 
KNOW WHICH YOU WAMTEO BUT AT LAST J CHOSE ONE WITH A BOG ENGRAVED ON 
ONE SIDE WD A CAT ON THE OTHER AND A PLACE FOR /\nNIE3 NAME /\NNIE 

SAID IT WAS BEAUTIFUL AND SHE USES IT ALL THE TIME. "^HIS IS THE LAST LET- 
TER T SHALL WRITE TO YOU AND T AM VERY SORRY TO SAY GOODBYE. /WBE 
WHEN J AM A BIGGER BOY T WILL WRITE TO YOU AGAIN AND PET SAYS THAT 
PERHAPS WE SHALL MEET 30ME OF YOU ONE OF THESE PATS. J HOPE SO, AND 
TILL THEN Pet AND J SEND YOU OUR BEST LOVE. 

v /OUR LITTLE FRIEND, 

/RANKIE. 



Y c 



MRS. BUSSFUSS'S PARTY. 




Louie shut the door of the 
room where her dolls were 
She was in a 
great hurry, and had left them 
all upside down, but no sooner 
had the door closed than a 
wonderful thing happened. 

Mrs. Bussfuss, the oldest 
doll of all, stood up on her 
feet, exclaiming, " Dear, dear ! 
I thought she never would 
leave us alone ; and this is 
the night of the party too ! 



MRS. BUSS FUSS'S PARTY. 



Ml 



Mr. Bussfuss, my dear, get up, or you won't be ready;" and she 
helped him to stand alone and pulled on his coat, for Louie 
had dropped him where he lay, half-dressed. 

Then she bustled around, seeing that each dolly had her best 
gown on, and telling them where to sit or stand ; for the party 




was to be a fine affair, and they must not forget the good man- 
ners Louie had so carefully taught them. 

As soon as all the people were in bed and the house quiet, 
the fun for the dolls began. 

Did any one ever see such a noisy set ? Mr. Bussfuss danced 
up and down the room with the rag baby, that had lost all of 
its hair. 

Mrs. Bussfuss tip-toed wildly back and forth with the Chinese 
boy Louie's Uncle Torn had brought her from China. The long 



372 



MRS. BUSSFUSS'S PARTY. 



braid of hair on the Chinaman's head hit the furniture, as 
he went around and around ; while all the little Bussfusses 
whirled and bumped into each other, to the great disgust of 
Louie's Paris doll, who sat on a chair in a beautiful silk dress. 
She told, in a loud voice, what she did when she lived at home. 
No one took any notice of her, for all were having too good a 

time. 

Just in the midst of the fun a strange 

noise was heard, and two great fiery eyes 

looked into the doll-house. 

It was Louie's kitten, who had been left 

in the room over night ; but how could the 

dolls know that ? They were sure it was 

some wild animal. 

The kitten walked into the house and 
curled itself up in Mrs. Bussfuss's bed, and that was the end of 
the party. 

When Louie came in the morning she wondered who had 
mussed up her dolls' house. But the dolls all looked so solemn 
that she never suspected they had had a party, and they have 
never told to this day. 

LOUISE THRUSH. 





1 A\e^N to tit 




, OCfoker; 

' ]ovtkst , 
\i&.$ S 0C W tici 
a i up \hT 

IS? tkir I°a£ 
wiVters 
mt- 

U&G. 




v » 



HOW GEORGE RAN AWAY. 

The story that Alice was reading was " Whittington and his Cat." 
George thought it rather hard when his mamma asked him to put it 
by to do something for her. I am afraid he was naughty ; for all the 
time he kept thinking how nice it would be to do just as he pleased. 
After a while he said : — 

" Mamma, I think I'll run away." 

" I do not understand you, dear," she answered. 

" Well, I don't like to be bothered," he said, " and I want to be 
like Whittington." 

« Very well, you may go if you are not happy in your home," re- 
plied the mother. " I will help you to get ready. You need not 
run away." 

Then she tied some of his clothes in a large handkerchief, and put 
the bundle on a stick, over his shoulder, like the picture of Whitting- 
ton. She kissed him good-by when she opened the street door for 
him. George looked pretty solemn as he went down the steps. In 
a minute he went back and rang the bell. Mary let him in, and he 
ran to his mamma's room. 



HOW GEORGE RAN AWAY. 



375 



"May I sleep on the back porch to-night?" he asked. His lips 
trembled a little. 




" No, dear, your papa doesn't like to have tramps sleeping on the 
porch," she replied. 

" Then can I stay in the stable with John ? " 



376 



HOW GEORGE BAN AWAY. 



" Oh, no ! You had better run away at once, a long way off, 
where you can do as you please." 
Poor George was in tears now. 
''0 mamma, mamma!" he cried, throwing himself in her arms, 




" I do love you so, and I don't want to run away. I hate to do as I 
please. May I come home again to live ? " 

" Dear little boy ! Mamma is glad you have learned your lesson 
with so little heart-ache," answered the mother, as she took her sob- 
bing boy in her loving arms. 

George never wanted to run away again. 

0. EMMA CHENEY. 




PATTY AND THE BUTTERFLY. 



Patty is three years old. Her mamma was very busy one day, 
and so let her go into the garden to pick some flowers. 

Patty had gathered some pinks and rosebuds, when her mamma 
heard her sobbing and crying. 

" "What is the matter, Patty ? " asked mamma, in alarm. 

" See," said Patty, " my prettiest flower has got some wings, and 
has flown away ! " 

Then mamma smiled and took Patty in her arms and kissed 
her. She told her that in the garden to-morrow she might see 
the same beautiful butterfly on another flower. 

That is how Patty mistook the butterfly for a flower. 

She knows now that butterflies have wings, but flowers do not. 

AUNT OLIVE. 




BESS. 

Bess plucked me a rose 

From her own little garden; 

Oh, my failing she knows ! 

Bess plucked me a rose 

As white as blown snows 

When they glitter and harden ; 

Bess plucked me a rose 

From her own little garden. 

Bess's face is so white, 

Like a blossom in Maytime ; 

Though her cheeks are pink quite, 

Bess's face is so white, 

And her eyes are as bright 
As the dawn or the daytime; 

Bess's face is so white, 

Like a blossom in Maytime. 



Bess is a sweet little miss, 

Eight years old last October ; 
When I call her it is 
To beg for a kiss ; 
She grows bashful at this, 



BESS. 



379 




And looks downward quite sober ; 
Bess is a sweet little miss, 
Eight years old last October. 



ROBERT OGDEN FOWLER. 




S^i: 









>~Kl\£at 



^ t 



tim 



Wfm 



^M 







WHAT INSECTS ARE GOOD FOR. 



How would you like to have insects for food ? In Africa people 
eat ants well stewed in butter. In Sweden they put them with rye, 
to give a flavor like brandy. Pressed ants' eggs make a mixture 
very much like chocolate paste with milk. They taste like caramels, 
that you buy so often at the candy store. Think of that ! 

The large white ants, or termites, are roasted, too, in iron pots, by 
the African children. They are eaten by handsful just like sugar- 
plums, and they are said to taste like sweet almond paste. 

As for the locusts that we should run away from, they think it is 
just so much bread and butter. They smoke and boil, or salt and 



WHAT INSECTS ARE GOOD FOR. 



581 



stew them. Sometimes they grind them into a sort of meal, 
fat in eating the bread made out of it. 

In New California there is a spider nearly an inch long, 
roasted over the fire as a very choice bit. The eggs of a sort 
fly the Mexicans shake in a kind of 
cloth, set them to dry, and grind 
them like flour. They sell in sacks, 
to make a peculiar kind of cake. 
These eggs, unground, are used, 
too, for the feeding of chickens. 

How would you like such food ? 
I am afraid not very well ! But 
the children of these far-away coun- 
tries learn to like these insects as 
much as you would a piece of roast 
beef. 



and set 



that is 
of boat- 



JVIKS. G. HALL. 




-Jfw^MA 



BUMBLL 







itrrtf 







Tiik brown and yellow Bumble- 
bees ! 
When winds are warm and skies 

are sunny, 
And brightest are the summer 

hours, 
They spread their wings, and 

hover over 
A million heads of purple clover ; 
And each head has a hundred flowers ; 
And each flower has its hoard of honev, 
That just too deep within it lies 
For common bees and butterflies ; 
But is all waiting kept for these 
Big, jolly, feasting Bumble-bees ! 



BUMBLE-BEES. 



383 



The brown and yellow Bumble-bees ! 

When winds are warm and skies are sunny, 

They make of waxen cells a store 

To fill with purple-clover honey. 

Their houses in the grass are hid, 

The thick, warm, sheltering moss amid. 

And if of one of them the door, 

By chance, a footstep comes too near, 

" Buzz ! Buzz ! " a war-cry straight you hear ; 

A crowd rush out with whirring wings : 

" Stand back, or you will feel our stings ! 

This little homestead is our own ; 

We're peaceful if we're let alone ; 

But, if upon our rights you seize, 

You'll find how brave are Bumble-bees ! " 

MARIAN DOUGLAS. 





AUTUMN. 



OUR LITTLE ONES 



AND 



THE NURSERY: 



Illustrated Stories and Poems 



FOR 



LITTLE PEOPLE. 



WILLIAM T. ADAMS 

(Oliver Optic), 
IS tutor. 



WITH 384 ORIGINAL ILLUSTRATIONS. 



BOSTON: 
RUSSELL PUBLISHING COMPANY. 

1888. 



Copyright, /SSS, 
By Russkll Publishing Company. 



OUR LITTLE ONES 

AND 

THE NURSERY: 

AN ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE FOR LITTLE PEOPLE. 

PUBLISHED EVEKY MONTH IN THE YKAK, 

AT $1.50 A YEAR, 

jjy tub 

RUSSELL PUBLISHING COMPANY, 

36 Bkomfield Street, 

Huston, Mass. 



FRKSS OF 

ROCKWELL AND CHURCHILL, 

BOSTON, 



r-&~ 




CONTENTS. 



Subjects. 
A Paper House 
A Small Guide 
A Queer Birthday-Present . 
A Gossip with the Moon 
A Funny Dinner . 
A Message from Santa Claus 
A Christmas Ride Fifty Years ago 
A Christmas Hymn 
A Riding Bear 
A Turtle Ship 

April ..... 
A New Use for Clothes-pins 
A New Cure 
A Small Philosopher . 
A Race and who won it 
A Fairy Cradle 

A Chicken with a Wooden Leg 
All about a Big Wave 
August . 

A Land Voyage . 
After the Shower . 
A Curious Traveller 
A Piece of Sponge 
Autumn 



Betsy Jane . 
Bears at School . 
Bubbles 
Betty's Playthings 



Authors. 

Nina Stevens Shaw 
Clara 0. Bolliver 
V. S. B. 



R. W. Lowrie 
Otto Brey 
Egbert G. Bangs 
F. P. Chaplin 
V. Stuart Mosby 
Jennie S. Judson 
Kham . 
L. B. C. 



Mrs. M. N. Sanford 
Mrs. Frances Smith 
Lucy Willing 
Louise B. Baker . 
Mrs. Mary Johnson 
Aunt Estelle . 
Joanna Staats 
L. B. C. 



C. Emma Cheney . 
George Cooper 
Julia P. Ballard . 
Mrs. G. Ball 
An Illustration 



F. P. Chaplin 
Lucy B. Fleming 
E. S. T. 



Virginia C. Hollis 



Page. 

15 

17 

28 

32 

64 

79 

82 

84 

125 

164 

167 

178 

184 

220 

221 

228 

286 

304 

307 

318 

320 

356 

358 

384 

30 

48 

96 

251 



IV 



CONTENTS. 



Subjects. 

Building the Nest 
Building a Rockery 
Bess .... 
Bumble-bees 

Caught in their own Trap 

December 

Eddie to the Moon 
Ernestine's Tooth 
Edgar's Soldier Lesson 
Ever so many Hats 



Frankie's Letter, No. 
Fishing for Birds 
Frankie's Letter, No. 



Five Cents for Candy . 

Frankie's Letter, No. 4 

Februaiy 

Freddie's Valentine 

Frankie's Letter, No. 5 

Flowers that love the Sun 

Frankie's Letter, No. 6 

Flowers that hide from the Sun 

Frankie's Letter, No. 7 

Fred's Stolen Ride 

Frankie's Letter, No. 8 

Freshening Fish . 

Four Little Bobolinks . 

Frankie's Letter, No. 9 
" 10 
" 11 

Frisky .... 

Frankie's Letter, No. 12 

Guinea Eggs 
Grandma's Surprise 
Grandma's Christmas Gifts 
Grandmother's Story . 



How Doll got through the Snow . 
How Nan earned Christmas Money 
Helen's Birthday .... 
How Grandpa kindled the Fire . 
How the Babies rode . 
How we Girls helped . 



Authors. 

Elizabeth A. Davis 
R. W. Loivrie 
Robert Or/den Fowler 
Marian Douglas . 

M. C. W. B. . 

L. B. C. 

Nellie M. Garabrant 
Anna M. Pratt 
C. Bell . 
Alice D. Churchill 

Frankie 

Mrs. Frances Smith 

Frankie 

Blanche Douglass . 

Frankie 

L. B.C. 

M. D. H. 

Frankie 

Mrs. O. Ball 

Frankie 

Mrs. G. Hall 

Frankie 

Florence B. Hallowell 

Frankie 

Florence B. Hallowell 

Amanda M. Douglas 

Frankie 



Katie Kyle . 
Frankie 

Pink Hunter 
Mrs. D. P. Sanford 
Christine Stephens 
J. D. E. 

Kham . 

Christine Stephens 
Anna M. Pratt 
Kale True 
Emma C. Dowd . 
A.M. . 



CONTEXTS. 



Subject*. 

How Noah's Ark went to School 

How Tom took Care of Dot 

Hawks and Hollyhocks 

How Tot went to the Park 

Haying Time 

How George ran away . 

I wonder if Baby ever think 
Isadora's Goat 

January, 1888 

Jessie and the Goat 

June 

July .... 

Jodie's Mistake . 

Little Christmas Carollers 
Little May's Jewels 
Lucy's New Shoes 

Motherless Dollies 

Mother's Story of Christmas 

My Valentine 

March . 

Mollie and her Kid 

March . 

Mistress Kitty 

May . . . 

Mamma's Good-Night 

Miss Flippety Floppet 

Mrs. Bussfuss's Party 

Nannie's Gift 

November . 

Not at Home 

Nell's Idea of the Stars 

Night-Flowers 

Nissie at the Lake 

Our Pet Goat 

One Christmas Night 

Our Baby Year 

Our Brigand 

On the Race-Course 

Only with Me 

Out in the Wind . 

Only a Cricket chirping away 

October .... 



Authors. 


Page. 


J. K. Ludlum 


. 204 


Kalie Kyle . 


. 212 


Lavinia S. Goodwin 


. 214 


Lizzie May Sherwood . 


. 280 


L. A. France 


. 291 


C. Emma Cheney . 


. 374 


II. W. L. 


. 137 


Ellen L. Knox 


. 323 


L. B.C. 


. 75 


Mrs. C. 0. Harrington . 


. 19G 


L.B.C. 


. 237 


L.B.C. 


. 268 


Mrs. S. M. II. Gardner 


. 308 


L. A. F ranee 


. 67 


George S. Burleigh 


. 195 


Katy Kyle 


. 269 


H. G. L. . . . 


. 37 


Katharine Hull 


. 88 


Mary McGwire 


. 99 


Sydney Dayre 


. 131 


Anna M. Pratt 


. 152 


L.B.C. 


. 157 


Emma C. Dowd . 


. 177 


L. B. C. 


. 217 


Eudora G. Bumstead . 


. 316 


Emma L. Cass 


. 355 


Louise Thrush 


. 370 


C. G. D. 


22 


L. B. C. 


. 27 


Kham .... 


. 40 


May M. Anderson 


. 50 


Mrs. G. Hall 


. 192 


S. A. E. Crowe . 


. 338 


E. L.F.P. . 


. 58 


Katharine Hull 


. 68 


Emma C. Dou-d . 


. 72 


" . . 


. 163 


Francis Coe . 


. 171 


Geo. S. Burleigh . 


. 294 


Christine Stex>hens 


. 313 


Elizabeth A. Davis 


. 367 


L.B.C. 


. 373 



VI 



CONTENTS. 



Subjects. 
Pictures of Baby Lou . 
Playing Mother . 
Peter the Cobbler 
Prince Charles's Lesson 
Polly's Pupil 
Playing- Noah's Ark 
Prompt Payment . 
Pretty Polly . 
Playing Station 
Pie-Town 

Patty and the Butterfly 
Robby in the Tunnel . 

Sing Fan 

Seven Little Pigeons . 
Sue's Dandelion Greens 
Spring .... 
Sammy's Boat 
Sugaring Off 
Sensitive Plants . 
Shep's Celebration 
Summer Days 
September . 
September . 

The Silhouette Party . 

The Wild Geese . 

The Turkey Buzzard . 

Tommy's Cart-load of Biscuits 

The Milkman's Horse . 

The Scissors-Grinder . 

The Snow Castle . 

The Pop Family . 

Three Little Maids from Canada 

The Creepmouse . 

The Story of the Gander 

The First Snow-Storm . 

Toboganning 

The Shipwreck of November 

The Funny Man from Funny-Lan 

The Bird's Baby-Show 

Teddy and Joe 

The Sea's Harvest 

The Bed Dragon . 

The Three Little Goose}' Goslings 

The Little Dairy Maid . 

The Dodder Whip 

The Fourth of July . 



Authors. 

Virginia C. Hollis 
George Cooper 
E. M. Chapman 
Kham . 
Sydney Dayre 
Uncle Felix . 
Catharine S. Holmes 
S. Fanny Gerry Wilder 
Florence B. Hallo well 
George Cooper 
Aunt Olive . 
Ellen S. Knox 

Clara G. Dolliver . 

Gussie P. DuBois . 

Alary A. Sawyer . 

Emma C. Dowd . 

Pink Hunter . 

Clara Doty Bates . 

Mrs. G. Hall 

E. L. V. 

An Illustration 

L. B.C. 

An Illustration 

Mrs. 0. Howard . 
Marian Douglas . 
Mrs. 0. Howard . 
Tommy's Mamma 
A.M. . 
L. A. France 
Kham . 
Perm Andinck 
An Illustration 
Anna M. Pratt 
E. M. A. 

Mrs. Annie D. Bell 
Laura Bell . 
G. E.W. 

Marion Manville . 
George Cooper 
Agnes G. Gray 
Lavinia S. Goodwin 
Clara G. Dolliver . 
E. Annette Hills . 
Robert Ogden Fowler 
Julia P. Ballard . 
A. S. Cox . 



Subjects. 
To be Sunny 
The Fire-Cracker 
The Flamingo 
The Cricket and the Worms 
The Pansie's Secret 
Tenting Out 
The New Ferry-Boat . 
The Home-made Horse 
The Chimney Swallow 
The Singing Mice 
The Crow Thief . 
The Helpful Boy 
The Chick and the Duck 
The Yoked Kittens 
The Basket Boy . 

"What the Snow did 

What Roots are for 

What happened to Lloyd's Toad 

What the Blue Eyed Grass saw 

What Lady is She 

Who is He . 

When I'm a Man 

Wind Songs 

What I would do 

What Insects are good for 



CONTENTS. 




vii 


Authors. 


Page. 


. A. B 


2o3 








M. A. Haley . 


265 








Mrs. G. Hall 


277 
279 








Jennie S. Judson . 


282 








Christine Stephens 


283 








Lizzie May Sherwood . 


292 








M. E. N. Halheway 


296 








Marian Douglas . 


302 








Elizabeth A. Davis 


326 








Katie Kyle . 


328 








F. P. Chaplin 


332 








Clara G. Dolliver 


334 








Helen C. Lamed . 


351 








Pitik Hunter 


362 








George Cooper 


46 








Mrs. G. Hall 


63 








Emma C. Dowd . 


132 








Annie E. Jerome . 


234 








George Cooper . ' . 


264 








C. Pell .... 


306 








A. Giddings Park 


310 








Geo. S. Burleigh . 


340 






Annie Douglas Bell 


348 








Mrs. G. Hall 


380 





LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



The Illustrative Department under the direction of Mr. Geoi«;k T. Andrew. 



No. Subjects. 

1. Pictures of Baby Lou (full page). 

2. " What a pretty picture " 

3. " What a sad picture " 

4. " The picture of peace now " 

5. " Out on the porch " 
G. -'I'll be the mother" . 

7. " Write a letter to you every month "' 

8. " Saw her take an iron spoon " . 

9. "A nest hidden under sonic bushes " 

10. " A bright flame covered the mass " 

11. " A little bent figure came " 

12. " The old woman that swept " 

13. "Jack and Jill" .... 

14. " Little Bo-peep " 

15. "Little Miss Muffet" . 

16. " His name is Sing Fan " 

17. " One summer in my porch " 

18. " When we hear the wasps humming" 

19. " A bright, black-eyed little boy " 

20. " A number of naughty boys came up " 

21. " The wild geese going by " (full page) 

22. " She passed a candy store every daj r " 

23. " Nannie's eyes opened wide" 

24. " The buzzard is a kind of vulture " . 

25. " Silting with their wings half open " . 

26. " Picketed the bird near his door " 

27. November (full page) .... 



Artists. 

H. Winthrop Pevri 



Maud Humphrey 

Jessie McJJermvtl 
W. L. Slieppurd 

W. kit. J. Harper 



J. H. Snow . 
Parker Haydcn 

H. Winthrop Peiroe 

a ii 

Irene E. Jerome 
Minnie L. Kirk 

J. Oliver Nugent 



Lizbeth B. Voinins 



Page. 



s 

9 
JO 

11 
11 
11 
11 

12 
13 
15 
16 
17 
18 
21 
22 
23 
25 
25 
26 
27 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



IX 



No. Subjects. 

28. " Here in these Florida woods " . 

29. " It was a land-turtle " 

30. " When I found him in the pit " . 

31. " Her home was a large wire cage " 

32. " In a pier-glass she could arrange her feathers 

33. " I met the moon the other night" 

34. " Lilla put the doll's wig on his head 

35. " Their mothers are not here " 

36. " Cried until their eyes were red " 

37. " You have torn your new dress " 

38. " Ben played camel for the dolls " 

39. " Your laughing face " 

40. " Dear St. Nick is nigh " . 

41. " He has a little red cart " . 

42. " No one came but a little dog " . 

43. " Mother's boy, and her rosy-joy " 

44. " You have changed him so " 

45. Bears at School (title) 

46. " All the boys and girls ran " 

47. " Where the dinner pails and baskets were kept' 

48. " Held bottles of milk in their paws" 

49. " With grandma knitting" . 

50. " Why, that is old Peter" (full page) 

51. " We could draw her on board " . 

52. " Just like a sickle thin" 

53. " I fell flat on my face " 

54. " And stand by the stove " . 

55. " Walk up to a passing baby carriage 

56. " In front of the long mirror " 

57. " A gig in which Eddie could ride " 

58. What Roots are for (full page) . 

59. " All roots have little mouths " . 

60. " Is bird's nest soup " . 

61. Little Christmas Carollers (full page) 

62. " One Christmas night" 

63. " A small child crouching " . 

64. " Around a beautiful green tree " 

65. " She was growing very, very sleepy' 

66. "Together they flew up to the shining stars 

67. " Welcome, sweet Baby Year " . 

68. "To see them skim over the hard crust 

69. January. 1888 (full page) . 

70. How Doll got through (title) 

71. " She could walk upon the snow " 

72. " A pony on snow shoes " . 

73. A Message to Santa Claus (full page) 
^4. " October saw the red leaves fall " 
75. " In leaden-skied December " 



Artiste. 
Parker Hayden 



G. Hirschberg 

II . P. Barnes 

H. Winthrop Peirce 

Maud Humphrey 

G. Hirschberg 

hizbeth B. Cornins 

F. T. Merrill 

H. P. Barnes 

H. M. Beal . 



Minnie L. Kirk 
G. Hirschberg 
W. L. Sheppard 
Maud Humphrey 
Jessie McDermoll 
C. Hirschberg 



Parker Hayden 

W. L. Sheppard 

Maud Humphrey 
W. Si. J. Harper 
W. SI. J. Harper 



Maud Humphrey 
E. W. McDowell 
Lizbelh B. Comins 
II. M. Beal . 



Edith F. Foster 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



No. Subjects. 

76. " They travelled in a sleigh " . 

77. " Sang together the song of the long ago " 

78. " The little girl hard at work " . 

79. " Took them down to the hotel " 

80. " Such a baby as this " 

81. " One winter's night " 

82. " Telling a beautiful story " 

83. " Jesus was once a baby, too " . 

84. "I had to stay in bee) all day" . 

85. " I'm so mis'able " 

86. " Her mother felt the tooth " 

87. " It wasn't so bad, after all " . 

88. " Bubbles is a boy " . 

89. " Shows him pictures new " 

90. My Valentine (full page) . 

91. The Milkman's Horse (title) 

92. " A man went into the road to stop him " 

93. " When he came near the trough" 
91. " Prince seized the broomstick " 

95. The Scissors-Grinder (full page) 

96. " Admit one to the barn " . 

97. " Out came Mother Goose " 

98. " She sat down on a tuft'et " 

99. " Bo-Peep looking for her sheep " 

100. " It snowed all one day " . 

101. " What a splendid house it will make 

102. " Elephants, lions, and camels" 

103. " The elephant in his letter " 

104. Seven Little Pigeons (title) 

105. " To the golden West " 

106. " Two flew South" . 

107. " Two flew North " . 

108. " One left alone "... 

109. " Handed her five blight pennies " 

110. " I don't want the candy now " . 

111. How Grandpa kindled the Fire (title) 

112. "Big, deep fireplaces " (initial) 

113. " A good mairy years ago " 

114. " Packed into ox-wagons " 

115. " Fired right into the middle of it' 

116. February (full page) . 

117. " Carried him gentty to his chamber" 

118. " Where he could see them " 

119. " To draw a small wagon " 

120. " On the back of a monster bear" 

121. " And sometimes playful " 

122. " He would go into the water " . 

123. " He was dressed in his new suit" 



Artists. 

J. Steeple Davis . 
Jessie C. Shepherd 
F. T. Merrill 

J. E. Hatfield 



Jessie MrDermott 
Maud Humphrey 
it ii 

Miss E. S. Tucker 

Maud Humphrey 
H. M. Beal . 



W. L. Sheppard 

J. E. Snow . 
Maud Humphrey 



H. P. Barnes 
Jessie McDermott 

lb (( 

E. P. Dames 

ft it 

It If 

Minnie L. Kirk 
i t ct 

//. M. Deal . 



Lizbelh B. Comins 
Julia Robinson 

a (t 

Carl Eirschberg 



F. T. Merrill 



LIS T OF ILL US TRA TIONS . 



XI 



Xo. Subjects. 

124. " There he was, pants and all " . 

12.5. March (full page) 

126. " Pulling his skin up over his head " 

127. " They were carried into the kitchen ' 

128. " Swept out of doors "' (full page) 

129. " I wonder if baby ever thinks " 

130. " I wonder if baby ever laughs " 

131. " The time to wake and rub her eyes 

132. " We met a little boy " 

133. " Let's make a fire and roast 'em out 

134. " How those boys did sweat" 

135. " When baby in the morning" . 

136. " Creep-mouse, creep " 

137. ' "Our farm" .... 

138. Grandmother's Story (title) 

139. " And milk my pail full " . 

140. " A black snake ! " 

141. " And how did the}' ride ? " 

142. " A perverse little lassie " . 

143. " Now play I was Polly " . 

144. Three Little Maids from Canada 

145. " Nannie in a crotch " (full page) 

146. " So tight she could not move " . 

147. " Came a gander" (initial) 

148. " After Amy is tucked into her little, bed" 

149. " He caught up a stick " . 

150. March (full page) 

151. How we Girls Helped (title) 

152. " As a wandering Italian family " 

153. " Maggie at the hospital" . 

154. " This answer for an organ " 

155. " Every one laughed to see us" 

156. Our Brigand (full page) . 

157. A Turtle Ship (title) . 

158. " You could not fly like a crane" 

159. " He tumbled over and over " . 

160. " On the turtle's back stood a crane " 

161. April (full page) .... 

162. "Man}' wonderful plants grew wild" 

163. " He was very generous with his sleigh " 

164. " Some flowers love the sunlight " 

165. " His steed a rocking pacer " 

166. " Kitty is postilion " . 



Artists. 
F. T. Merrill 
Louis Meynelle 
W. L. Sheppard 
Maud Humphrey 
it t( 

Jessie C. Shepherd 



Jessie McDermott . 
F. T. Merrill 

Miss E. S. Tucker 

II. M. Beal . 



F. T. Merrill 
Julia Robinson 

Miss E. S. Tucker 
Carl Hirschberg 
tt i'. 

F. W. Freer . 



Lizbeth B. Comins 
J. II. Hatfield and 

Mallhcws 
J. H. Hatfield and 

Matthews 
J. H. Hatfield and 

Matthews 
J. II. Hatfield and 

Matthews 
J. II. Hatfield and 

Matthews 
J Steeple Davis . 
H. M. Beal . 



Lizbeth B. Comins 

Louis Maynelle 
< < (< 

Mrs. O. Hall 
F. T. Merrill 



■ilfred 
Alfred 
Alfred 
Alfred 

ilfred 



Xll 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Xo. Subjects. 

167. " All driven a-la-tandem " 

168. Playing Noah's Ark (full page) 

169. "Mistress Kitty, dainty and pretty" 

170. " With thirteen dollies " . 

171. " Two talking pollies " 

172. " And pussy-cats all in a row " . 

173. A New Use for Clothespins (title) 

174. " Held up one of the clothes-pins " 

175. " Pinched by a clothes-pin" 

176. " Mrs. President knelt down " . 

177. " Rockets are flashing " 

178. " Bonfires are glowing " 

179. " Down the steep snow-slide" . 

180. " And wondrous starlight " 

181. " Light from a realm of dreams " 

182. " A very bad habit of crying" . 

183. " Sew on your hair ! " 

184. " If I pay you in kisses " . 

185. Tlie Shipwreck of November (title) 

186. " Sailing it on the river V . 

187. " As fast as he could fly over the bri 

188. " He tells of ' Goo, ah Goo ' " . 

189. The Funny Man from Funny-Land (title) 

190. " Flowers that never see the sun " 

191. Little May's jewels (full page) . 

192. " Mr. Ravvson's goat was pastured there ' 

193. " Climbing upon the fence " 

194. " Lying buried in the deep grass" 
195.' " She was completely hidden " . 

196. " When the family were eating" 

197. " Climbed up on the bed" . 

198. The Bird's Baby-Show (full page) 

199. " She picked him up in her arms " 

200. Sue's Dandelion Greens (title) . 

201. " Sue opened the gate " 

202. " Sue and the boy worked" 

203. " Joe the professor and Teddy the boy ' 

204. " How fond some flowers are of the 

205. " He is a Chinese nobleman " 

206. How Tom took care of Dot (title) 

207. '• He began to rock the boat" . 

208. " Safe in their .arms again" 

209. " That large one watching for a chance " 

210. " Standing soberly among the hollyhocks 

211. " Hollyhocks and chickens " 

212. May (full page) .... 

213. " Fred sat down on the front steps " . 

214. " A woman lie had never seen before" 



bt' 



Artists. 

F. T. Merrill 

H. Winlhrop Peirce 

Julia Robinson 



Edith F. Foster 



Jessie McDermotl 
J. H. Hatfield 



Maud Humphrey 



H. M. Beal 



F. T. Merrill 

H. P. Barnes 
Miss E. S. Tuckc 

Carl Hirschberg 



Miss V. D. Prentiss 

Irene E. Jerome 
H. P. Barnes 
J. H. Snow . 



F. P. Merrill 
Louis MeyneUe 
Jessie MeDcrmotl 
L. D. Norton 



Edith F. Foster 



JAzbeth B. Comins 
J. H. Hatfield 



Page. 
173 

175 
177 
177 
177 
177 
178 
178 
179 
180 
181 
181 
181 
182 
183 
185 
186 
187 
188 
188 
189 
190 
190 
192 
194 
196 
197 
198 
199 
200 
201 
203 
204 
'206 
207 
208 
209 
210 
211 
212 
212 
213 
214 
215 
216 
217 
218 
219 



LIS T OF ILL US TEA TIONS . 



Xlll 



No. Subjects. 

215. " Teddy's blue eyes sparkled " . 

216. A Race and who won it (title) . 

217. "And away they ran " 

218. " Tossed the boy over his head " 

219. " Jack the donkey whinnied " . 

220. The Sea's Harvest (full page) . 

221. " Robbie found some queer things " 

222. " And carried him the flowers " 

223. Spring (full page) 

224. The Red Dragon (title) . 

225. " Looked up at the dragon " 

226. What the Blue-eyed Grass saw (title) 

227. " Dame Nature holds the bell " . 

228. Sammy's Boat (title) . 

229. " Sitting as usual on the shore " 

230. " A fishing-boat came up " 

231. June (full page) 

232. " Pet and I have got the measles " 

233. "I look just like this" 

234. " ' Come with me,' said the gray goose " 

235. " The old goose Happed her wings '" 

236. " Nurse put him in the hammock " 

237. " The two little boys began to laugh ' 

238. " A tree was bored with an auger '" 

239. " Nobodj' else but Connie" 

240. " Over the kitchen fire " . 

241. " Some plants do not like to be touched ' 

242. The Little Dairy Maid (full page) 

243. Betty's Playthings (initial) 

244. " I like my doll and carriage " . 

245. " In which she had a little pig" 

246. Building the Nest (full page) . 

247. The Dodder Whip (title) . 

248. " Frank lay on the wolf-rug " . 

249. The Fourth of July (full page) . 

250. Freshening Fish (title) 

251. " You needn't buy any meat, mamma ' 

252. " Oh, papa, they're gone" 

253. To be Sunny (full page) . 

254. " All the day she haunts the garden " 

255. The Fire-Cracker (full page) 

256. July (full page) 

257. " A beautiful pair of new shoes " 

258. " She was very proud of them " 

259. " Shep's master kept a livery stable " 

260. " He would go quite up to the cannon' 

261 . " There he staid for a number of days ' 

262. " In a cradle dainty and line " . 



A rtists. 
Maud Humphrey 
II. M. Beat . 



Edmund II Garrett 
Miss E. S. Tucker 



Edith F. Foster 
F. T. Merrill 

Irene E. Jerome 

L. D. Norton 

Lizbeth B. Comim 
Jessie McDermott 
it n 

Parker Hayden 

a tt 

./. //. Hatfield 



II. P. Barnes 
Alice Ilirsrhbcrg 
F. W. Freer . 



Louis Meynelle 
Miss E. S. Tucker 
it it 

A. S. Cox . 
L. D. Norton 



A. Brennan . 
II. P. Barnes 
II. Winlhrop Peircc 
Lizbeth B. Cornins 
Miss V. D. Prentiss 

II. M. Beat . 



Parker Hayden 



XIV 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



No. Subjects. 

263. " Rob goes by with a whistle gay " . 

264. " No match for. mother-care " 
2G5. " "What a beautiful bird " . 

2G6. " Catch all the worms and small frogs " 

2G7. " I pla}' all day on the beach " . 

2G8. " On the bough of a small mulberry" 

2G9. " And look after Tot and baby besides " 

270. The Pansies' Secret .... 

271. " To let them sleep out in a tent " 

272. " It was only the great black pig " 

273. Summer Days (full page) . 

274. " Adam made a wooden leg" 

275. " The rooster put on far more airs " . 

276. Haying Time (full page) . 

277. " The new ferry-boat was an old skiff" 

278. " Over he went backwards " 

279. " She sat alone on a mossy stone " 

280. " A merry chipmunk " 

281. " She had to search all her drawers " 

282. " Harry sprang upon the horse's back" 

283. " Who is the king?" 

284. "Where do they walk?" . 

285. " Three children came to my party " 

286. " The wide old house was damp and chill ' 

287. " On the hearth we dared not light a fire" 

288. " On the peacock's plumes they swung" 

289. " Harold and Marjorie were playing horse 

290. " With a splash it went all over him " 

291. "Who is that man?" 

292. August (full page) .... 

293. " Down a beautiful canon " 

294. " His mamma was standing beside him " 

295. " When I'm a grown-up man " . 

296. " Is kissed and put to bed " 

297. " She caught it down" 

298. " Up went the parasol " 

299. " Baby's bed shall be soft and white " 

300. " Some children found an empty barrel" 

301. " Lightly floating on the waves " 

302. After the shower .... 

303. " Cat-birds from the buslies cry " 

304. "Come! the rain is over" 

305. Isadore's Goat (full page) . 

306. " He was in a fight witli that stuffed head 

307. " lie could run up stairs " . 

308. " An} - poor little mouse " . 

309. " They fancied the}' must learn to sing" 

310. " Thought she would have a nap " 



Artiste. 

Parker Hayden 

Carl Hirschbenj 

Jessie McDennott 
H. P. Barnes 



H. W. Tucker 

Miss C. A. XorUiam 
Parker Hayden 

Miss E. S. Tucker 
A. Buhler 



Jessie C. Shepherd 

Minnie L. Kirk 

Maud Humphrey 

Jessie McDcrmott 
H. P. Barnes 

J. Steejde Dae is 

H. P. Barnes 
Lizbclh B. Cumins 
Parker Hayden 

Carl Hirschberr/ 

C. Meute 

Louis Meynelle 
L. 11. Burr . 

H. P. Barnes 

Carl Hirschberg 

F. S. Church 
A. Buhler 



Page. 

274 
275 
277 
277 
278 
279 
281 
282 
283 
284 
285 
28& 
287 
290 
292 
293 
295 
295 
296 
297 
299 
300 
301 
302 
302 
303 
304 
305 
306 
307 
308 
309 
311 
312 
313 
314 
316 
318 
319 
320 
320 
320 
322 
324 
325 
326 
327 
329 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



XV 



No. Subjects. 

311. " Had hung it on the apple-tree" 

312. September (full page) 

313. The Helpful Boy (title) . 

314. " Learned how to use many tools" 

315. " For Jimmy Gale " . 

316. " With giddy young ducks " 

317. ■ " I never have learned to swim " 

318. " He walked on the perilous rim " 

319. " I am going to school now " 

320. " The child was sitting down in the water 

321. " She had a nice time digging wells" 

322. Wind Songs (title) . 

323. " I'm shaking the trees, lad " 

324. " And the squirrel laughs" 

325. " Up, ho ! 'tis spring ! " 

326. " Haste, my mariner ! " 

327. " That Zephyr has taught the bees " 

328. Ever so many Hats (title) 

329. " Don had chewed up his hat " . 

330. " So Robby had five hats " . 

331. September (full page) 

332. " Give Frisky a bath in a tub " . 

333. "Harry had to carry him home '" 

334. What I would do (full page) 

335. " Hitched them into a small ox-cart" 

336. " The little kittens darted up the first tree 

337. Miss Flippetty Floppet (full page) 

338. A Curious Traveller (title) 

339. " Prettier than your flowers " 

340. "One straight stem, five branches'' 

341. " Some of the far-away seas " . 

342. " It is not easy to catch them " . 

343. Building a Rockery (full page) . 

344. " He made baskets " . 

345. " And put the apples into it " 

346. ltobby in the Tunnel (title) 

347. " We rolled some big sewer-pipes " 

348. " When we got out there " 

349. "He looked just like a turtle " . 

350. " In the fading light of autumn day " 

351. " And the grasses dry " 

352. " We will drop the letter" 

353. " This is the night of the party " 

354. " The fun for the dolls began " . 

355. " Two great fiery eyes " 

356. "The kitten curled itself up " . 

357. October (full page) . 
35S. " As he went down the steps " . 



Artists. 
A. Buhler 
Lizbcih B. Comins 
L. D. Norton 



Carl Hirschberg 



Jessie McDermoll 
A. Buhler 

H. P. Barnes 



H. M. Beal 



Lizbeth B. Comins 
Carl Hirschberg 

Louis Meynelle 
F. T. Merrill 

Carl Hirschberg 
A. Buhler 



Elizabeth S. Tucker 
II. W. Tucker 



H. M. Beal 



Parker Hayden 

Jessie McDermolt 
Carl Hirschberg 



Lizbcih B. Comins 
L. II. Burr . 



XVI 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 



No. Subjects. 

359. " I don't want to run away " 

360. '.' Into the garden to pick some flowers 

361. " My prettiest flower lias got wings " 

362. " Bess is a sweet little miss " 
563. " Bess plucked me a rose " 

364. " In Africa people eat ants " 

365. " The large white ants, or termites" 

366. Bumble-Bees (title) .... 

367. " And brightest are the summer hours 

368. Autumn (full page) .... 





Artists. 


Page 


. I.E. Burr . 


376 




H. P. Barnes 


. 377 
. 377 




Louis Meynelle 


. 378 
379 




Parker Hay den 


. 380 
. 381 




H. P. Barnes 


. 382 
. 383 




Elizabeth S. Tucker 


. 384 





mi %&*■. W/ -<o> 



"A Dry Cough" 

Is dangerous as well as troublesome. 
It renders the patient liable to the rup- 
ture of a blood vessel or to other serious 
injury of throat and lungs. To allay 
bronchial irritation and give immediate 
relief, the best medicine is Ayer's 
Cherry Pectoral. 

" I was recently troubled with a dry 
cough which seemed to be caused by an 
irritation in the throat. My physician 
prescribed for me, but no relief was ob- 
tained. A little over a week ago, my 
attention being called to Ayer's Cherry 
Pectoral, I concluded to try it, and pur- 
chased a bottle. After taking this med- 
icine only one day, I could see a change 
for the better, and, by the time I had 
used it a week, my cough had entirely 
disappeared." — H. W. Denny , Franklin 
square, Worcester, Mass. 

"Ayer's Cherry Pectoral leads all 
other medicines as a sure, safe, and 
speedy cure of throat and lung troubles." 
— AV. H. Graff & Co., Druggists, Carson, 
Iowa. 

Ayer's Cherry Pectoral, 

PREPARED BY 

Dr. J. C. Ayer & Co., Lowell, Mass. 

Bold hy all Druggists. Price $1 ; six bottles, $5. 




•FENGERIAN 
•TEELPENS 

Are the Best 



in the essential qualities of Durability, 
Evenness of Points and Workman- 
sJiij). Sample card containing five leading 
styles of Pens sent for trial, on receipt of re- 
turn postage, 2 cents. Ask for card No. 9. 



fflSOH, BLAKEMAN & CO. 



753 & 755 Broadway, 



- New York. 



wrn^mm 



GAU NTLE"LB RAND, 

as* 6 * SPICES 

* MUSTARD. 

SOLD ONLY IN FULL WEIGHT SEALED PACKAGES. 

Guaranteed absolutely pure, and warranted to excel 
all others in strength, richness, flavor and cleanliness. 




36 BROMFIELD ST., Boston, Mass. 



DRESSING 




Magazine, Newspaper and 
Specialty Advertising. 

Adverti3erapnts inserted in an? 
publication at publishers lowest 
rates. 

Special attention given to the 
preparation and illustration of ad- 
vertisements. 

Exclusive Advertising Agents foi 

"OUR LITTLE ONES AND THE NURSERY,'' 

Bound volumes" PIT A TTUD 'O f\ V " an r l other 
of LrlAl 1 HfVljUAj publications. 

specials SCRIBNER'S MAGAZINE, 
"THE CHAUTAUQUAN." 

" Household," *' Cottage Hearth," 
" Babyhood," and 

" Good Housekeeping." 

Correspondence solicited and estimates furnished for any 
desired line of advertising. 

GEORGE A. FOXCHOFT, 

Proprietor. 




Its superior excellence proven In millions of homes for 
more than a quarter of a century. It is used by tbe United 
Males Government. Endorsed by tbe beads oi the Great 
Universities as the Strongest, Purest, and most Healthful. 
]>r. Price's tbe only Baking Powder that does not contain 
Ammonia, Lime, or Alum. Sold only in Cans. 

PRICE BAKING POWDER CO., 

NEW YORK. CHICAGO. ST. LOUIS. 



M«N$fe 



192 PAGES: 

94 Colored Maps: 

60 Colored Diagrams. 

CONTAINS COMPLETE RAILROAD MAP OF 
EVERY STATE, TERRITORY AND COUNTRY 
IN THE WORLD, WITH STATISTICAL 
TABLES, ETC. 

Flexible covers, gold side stamp and red edges. A marvel of 

cheapness. Sent postpaid, to any address for 25 cents. 

5 copies for 81.00. Postage stamps taken. 

E. B. Coodnow & Co., 

Box 1687, BOSTON, MASS. 



PEERLESS DYES 



Sold by Druggists. 



EMERSON 



EVERY PIANO 
FULLY WARRANTED. 



"ij?7/Lo>»®| 



SEND FOR CATALOGUE PIAMO 

EMERSON." PIANO CO.] TIAIlU 

' WAREROtiMS, KbA.tREMONT.S.T. 

.:' -BOSTON '•'.- MASS- "-' ■'■, 



Our Club Rates with other Publications. 



Any person desiring to subscribe to other publications in connection with Our Little Ones can do 
so at a greatly reduced rate, by sending direct to this office. We will club One Little Oxrs with any publica- 
tion, but have only space enough to mention a few of the more prominent: 



Christian at Work ? 4 00 

Independent . 



Scribner's Magazine, 04 00 

Harper's Monthly Magazine 4 75 

Harper's "Weekly 4 75 

Harper's Bazar 4 75 

Harper's Young People ■ 3 00 

The Century 5 00 

St. Nicholas 4 00 

Atlantic Monthly 4 75 

Lippincott's Magazine .' 4 00 

"Wide Awake 3 75 

Golden Days 4 0D 

American Teacher 2 25 

New England Journal of Education 3 50 

Christian Union 4 00 

Babyhood 2 CD 

Good Housekeeping 3 CO 

The prices given above are for Our Little Oxes and any of the publications named, for one year, includ. 
ing postage on both. If the paper or magazine you wish to club with Our Little Ones does not appear on 
this list, then write to us for terms, before subscribing. Both publications most beordered at the same time 
but both need not necessarily go to one address, or commence with the same issue. 

RUSSELL PUBLISHING COMPANY, 

36 Bromfleld Street, Boston, Mass 



4 00 

Scientific American 4 00 

Sunday School Times 3 00 

Demorest's Monthly s m 

Arthur's Home Magazino 3 00 

Godey's Ladies Book 3 0:) 

Peterson's Magazine 3 00 

American Agriculturist 2 CO 

The Cottage Hearth 2 a 

The Household 2 CD 

Chatterbox 2 00 

Littell's Living Age 8 °° 

Dorcas 

Ct. Louis Magazino 



2 25 
2 00 



HILDREN WILL BRUSH THEIR TEETH 

with tlie Child's Prophylactic Tooth Brush (made of soft bristles and delicate enough for a 1 year 
old babe) because it cleans all the teeth so perfectly. Every Dentist urges more care for the first 
teeth. Kothing for cleaning the teeth has ever had the world wide endorsements of thi3 brush. 
Adults uso the Prophylactic for natural teeth and The Florence Dental Plato Brush for artificial. 
For children from the age of 7 to 14 a special youths size is made. Descriptive circulars. 

Florence Manufacturing Company, Florence, Mass. 

Adults', Youths*, and Childs* sizes kept by all Druggists and Dentists. 



JOSEPH CI LLOTTS 

STEEL PENS 

Sold Br ALL DEALERSThroughoutThe WORLD 
GOLD MEDAL PARIS EXP0SITION-I87B. 



WHOOPING COUCH 

40 years' test of Delavau's Remedy proves its merit. Quickly 
dispels the whooping, greatly allays and lessens severe parox- 
ysms of coughing— cutting short the disease. Its peculiar 
anti-spasmodic action insures sleep ; and is absolutely harm- 
less in effect. When physicians' or domestic treatment fall, 
you can rely on "DELAVAU'S." 5Qc. a bottle. Sold by 
druggists. Depot Cth and "Wood Streets, Philadelphia, Pa. 



INK 



BLACK T VIOLET 



PINK | RED \ CREEN 



You enn make it yourself -without tlie slightest trouhle, and ata 
saving of 20O per cent, with "WALPOLB INK POWDERS, 
whicft will yield several quarts of the best Ink in the world. 
Package of either color 25 cents. Liberal discount in large pack- 
ages to parties desiring to make Ink for Bale. Used extensively by 
Schools, Banks, Merchants, and Blank Book Manufacturers. jTutl 
information by, circular, free by mail* Address, 
W At. POLE DYE AND CHEMICAL COMPANY, 
* 1 19 Milk St., Boston, Mass., U. S. A. 




GOLD MEDAL, PAEIS, 1878. 

BAKER'S 



gpALDINp's 

PREPARED 

The Famous Adhesive of the World. War- 
ranted seven times the strength of 
any other liquid glue. 
7/ holds like a vice. It mends everything. 

THE STANDARD FOR THIRTY YEARS. 

2-ounce bottle, 25 cents with brush. 

Sold Everywhere. 



Warranted absolutely purm 

Cocoa, from which the excess of 
Oil has heen removed. It has three 
times the strength, of Cocoa mixed 
with Starch, Arrowroot or Sugar, 
end is therefore far more economi- 
cal, costing less than one cent a 
cup. It ia delicious, nourishing, 
strengthening, easily digested, and 
admirably adapted for invalids aa 
well as for personB in health. 
Sold by Grocers eve rywhere. 

W. BAKER & CO., Dorchester, Mass. 




OYS 



Now's your time to get up clubs 
for our celebrated froods and pro- 
cure a Beautiful Watch — 
Stem Winder and stem 
Setter — Imported Swiss Move- 
ment. Just the watch for boys. We have in stock a 
large line of premiums for all. Tor full particulars 
address The Great American Tea Co. 
P. O. Box 289. 31 & 33 Vesey St., New York, N. Y. 



PEERLESS 



UllEt) Sold by Druggists. 




LADY AGENTS SEnHH 

employment at $50 to ?1U0 per 
month selling Queen City Bup- 
porterH. Sample outfit free. 
Address Cincinnati Suspender 
Co.,UE.NinthSt.,CincinuaU,0, 



PEERLESS DYES ^ re thc BEST 



Sold by Druggists. 



LADIES' BOOTS 
ONLY $2,00, 

best for the Money mads. 
RETAIL 

EVERYWHERE 
FOR 
$3.00. 

On receipt of Two Dollars we will send yon 
by mail, POSTAGE PAID, a pair of theso 
Elegant Button Boots, worked button-holes, 
in either kid or goat, or glove-top kid-foxed, 
any size you want. Give us a trial. Address 

UNITED STATES SUPPLY CO., BOST/N, MASS. 

P. O. Box 3348 or Wesleyan Building. 

Jgir-Ref er to the publishers of this magazine as to 
our reliability. 




CANDY 



Send 81, $2, $3, or $5 for a retail 
box by express of the best candies 
in America, put up elegantly, and 
strictly pure. Suitable for presents. 
Refers to all Chicago. Address 



GVNIHER, Confectioner, 213 State St., Chicago. 



Twtfserv&nfs fa two „ 
neighboring houses dwelt "' ' 

But differently theiy 
tally laiior fe|j 

J&ded &nd wees; 



of her life w&s?m 





^ Jw&ys at work and 

r et twas never done 

e other walked 

" out nightly with 

j^ her beau - But 

then she cleaned 

house with Sapolio. 




the LARGE DEMAND 

FOR 

GOOD SENSE 

CORDED CORSET WAISTS 

For Ladies, Misses and Children 
gives an opportunity to unprincipled 
dealers to offer 

INFERIOR IMITATIONS 

under various names, upon 

which they can make a larger 

profit, saying they are"about 

as good as the GOOD 

SENSE Waist." 
THEY ARE NOT AS GOOD. 

B^^Be sure your Corset is 
stamped "Good Sense." 

Sold by all Leading Retailers. 
Send for Circular. 

CCDDIC DPDQ Manufacturers, 

rtnnlo onuoi newyokk 



Sf'THE DELIGHT. OF .EPICURES" v'.<K; ' 

ggf Tbmatorvctchup- :|^ 

5fik THE FIRST MAMUFAETUREO FROM p." : \ 



DELICIOUS WITH H0T&CO.LD ; CUTS,OySTER STEWS, FISH &c. 

GIVES A SUPERIOR FLAVOR TO GTIAVIE5 -.«* AMY PREPARATlOM or MEAT 
"cf UAJJAon A m 87 HUDSON ST. N,Y. ;■ 2oj Bott«e. Sent Free 
.C.lj.nHXMKU «LU. . SOLE PROPRIETORS' ! MFNTH1N Tun PiiRi r.JTiON 



YOU CAN ADD TO THIS LI3I CF TEE USES OF 

SAPOLIO 



EVERY ONE FINDS A NEW VSE. 



To clean tombstones. 
To polish knives. 
To renew oil-cloth. 
To brighten metals. 
To scour bath-tubs. 
To whiten marble. 



To scrub floors. 
To renovate paint. 
To wash out sinks. 
To clean dishes. 
J o scour kettles. 
To remove rust. 



EVERYBODY USES IT. 



Dentists to clean false teeth. 

ftnrseons to polish their instruments. 
Confectioners to scour their pans- 
Mechanics to hrighten their tools. 

Engineers to clean parts of machines. 

Ministers to renovate old chapels. 
Sextons to clean the tombstones. 

Hostlers on brasses and -white horses. 
Painters to clean off surfact s. 

Soldiers to brighten their arms. 

Artists to clean their palettes- 
Cooks to clean the kitchen sink. 

Housemaids to scrub the marble floors 
Chemists to remove some stains. 

Carvers to sharpen their knives. 

Shrewd ones to scour old straw hats. 



_ .nrvwwwi. 
TAYLOR'S 



SS ElSFrtATT A G H I N G 



DRESSSTAJ^ 

One dozen can be fastened to dress or Jersey in 
2 minutes by pressure of a Uot iron. No Sewing. 
Cannot break, or wrinkle, or (/it loose. Sample 
dozen by mail, S5 cents. 

TAYLOR'S FULL MESS FOLDING BUSTLE. 
ia the caMtst, lightest, and most 
practical Folding bustle ever made. 
Lasts longer, and gives better sat- 
isfaction tban any dollar bustle. 
Can't get out of shape. By mail, 25c 
. fastens perfectly and pcrman* 
\ ently by pressure of a hot iron. 
'Free from Odor. No stitches nor 
needle-holes. No "wrinkles nor 
creases. The perfection of Dress 
"Shields. By mail, 20 cen ts a pair. 
Dress-Makers and Canvassing Agents Supplied. 
THOS. P. TAYLOR, Bridgeport, Conn. 




PLEASE REMEMBER THAT 

ESPEY'S FRAGRANT CREAM 

Is the finest and best preparation in the wonfi fof 
i hupped Huntln and Routrh si.in. Has the 
largest sale, gives better satisfaction than any 
oiher article. Beware of imitations claiming to b€ 
the same thing or Just as groct Sold everywhere. 



<•, Habla V. Espanol ? 
Parle?: -Vons Francais? 
Sprechen Sie Peutsch ? 
Parlate Italiano? 



IZST TE1T "^7"E!E3IZS 

You can, at your own home, by 

Dr. RICHARD S. ROSENTHAL'S MEISTERSCHAFT SYSTEM, 

learn to speak fluently either Spanish, French, Italian or German. 
Speciman Copy, Spanish, French, German, or Italian, 25 Cents. 

All subscribers — $5. 00 for each language — become actual pupils of Dr. Rosenthal, 
who corrects all exercises, and corresponds with them in regard to any difficulties 
which may occur. 



MEISTERSCHAFT PUBLISHING CO., Herald Building, Boston, Mass. 



Pears' Soap 

Fair white hands. 

Bright clear complexion 

Soft healthful skin. 

"PEARS' -The Great English Complexion SOAP, — Sold Everywhere." 

TF common soaps are irritating* to 
the skin of adults, as they un- 
questionably are, they are doubly 
and trebly injurious to the delicate 
skin of the infant and young child ; 
but Pears' Soap is used and recom- 
mended by thousands of intelli- 
gent mothers throughout the civ- 
ilized world, because, "while serving 
as a detergent and cleanser, its 
emollient properties prevent the 
chafing and discomfort to which 
infants are so liable. 

Pears' is the best, most elegant 
and the most economical of all 
TOILET SOAPS. It wears to the 
thinness of a wafer, has been estab- 
lished in London 100 years, has 
received 15 international awards, 
and is sold in every city in the 
world. 





*&- — ; ■ w* 

A LETTER FROM MARION HARLAND. 

[FAC SIMILE.] 

<?&k*J t gZeZT~ &t^6C JLz^ey 
&-^&-£4*s I p-*^f- /b&d 4-eztsLs a^. ^c^tAe^cT 

-^-4^^, G/iszi-^^ d^L^^y j^^r 42*t24&j^L^**. 

*B fa 




M Thos 



Nelson and Sons, London. 



[Copyright 1888, by Russell Publishing Company.] [Entered at the P. 0. at Boston as second-class matter.] 



CONTENTS. 





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,d O 1- 





A GREAT DAY IN PARIS Oliver Optic 

(Illustrated by Edmund H. Garrett.) 

WONDERLAND : Annie Douglas Bell . . 

(Illustrated by Parker Hayden.) 

PET IN THE COUNTRY — I J. McD 

(Illustrated by Jessie McDermolt.) 

WHERE THE CANDLES GO Mattie P. Banks .... 

(Illustrated by Louis Meynelle.) 

THE LITTLE ACTORS A. S. C , 

(Illustrated by A. S. Cox.) 

A GOOD GIANT George Cooper 

(Illustrated by H. P. Barnes.) 

EVA'S DANCING LESSON Penn Andinck 

(Illustrated by Louis Meynelle.) 

THE LADY OF THE TRICYCLE Lavinia S. Goodwin . . 

(Illustrated by Carl Hirschberg.) 

BETSY'S DOOR PLATE M. A. Haley 

(Illustrated by Miss V. D. Prentiss.) 

ROVER'S STORY Auntie May 

(Illustrated by Carl Hirschberg.) 



J 



iS 



THE CHAMOIS MOTHER Mrs. Mary Johnson . . 

(Illustrated by Carl Hirschberg.) 

JACK AND THE PARASOL Aunt Ida 

(Illustrated by L. D. Norton.) 

SEE-SAW Amanda M. Douglas . , 

(Illustrated by Minnie L. Kirk.) 

LITTLE JOE'S TEMPTATION Christine Stephens . . 

' (Illustrated by H. W. Tucker.) 

The Illustrative Department under the direction of Mr. George T. Andrew. 



22 

24 

26 
2S 

30 



OUR LITTLE ONES AND THE NURSERY, 



One Year .... 
Sixteen Months . 



Two Copies, one year 
Three Copies, " 



{MONTHLY.) 

TERMS (in advance). 
. $1.50. Eight Months . . 

2.00. Single Copies . . 

CLUB RATES. 
$2.80. Four Copies, one year 



$1.00 



15 cents. 



4.00. 



Five Copies, 



$5.00. 
6.00. 



Subscriptions: — Change of post-office address can be made by giving the old as well as the 
new address, but not without this information. Notice should be received the first of the preceding 
month. 

Remittances are at risk of the publishers only when sent by Postal Order, American Express 
Order, Check, or Registered Letter. Checks, Drafts, and Orders should be made payable to the 

RUSSELL PUBLISHING COMPANY, BOSTON, MASS. 

CLEANFAST-BLACK STOCKINGS 

(F. P. ROBINSON CO. DYE.) 
For Men, WOMEN and Children. Money refunded i£ they stain or fade. 

THE CLEANFAST HOSIERY CO., 

927 Broadway and 2 West 14th Street. New York ; 107 State Street, Chicago. 

40 West Street, Boston, 






a/^ 



1£E_ A 5HE.PARQ PUBLISHERS' BOSTON.; 



the works it represents. 



ALL AROUND THE YEAR 

A charmingly illustrated calendar for 1889. By J. 
Pauline Suntek. Consists of beautiful original de- 
signs, on heavy board, in sepiatint and gold, gilt edges, 
ornamented with rings and chains in silver, with silk 
tassel, and boxed. 

In the artistic grouping of a year's progress as -pre- 
sented in Mrs. Sunter's Sepiatint Calendar a series of 
illustrations of the flight of time form the prominent 
attractive features of mis exquisite boudoir almanac in 
which the successive dates of the months appear in plain 
figures on tablets twelve in number and with other illus- 
trations form a beautiful souvenir. The entrance to 
"all the vear round" introduces two rustic "tots" by 
t\ oU c\d the wayside looking out with curious eyes. Opening the 

ZVJL/^" \r, cover, we find the winged ringers of " the New Year's 

0/ ™ ^ft\o Ve^r bells." Ohen come the emblematic figures of the months. 

The shivering little figure of January bending over the 
fire has a smiling "Happy New Year" for the visitor. 
The extremely youthful lovers of February will provoke 
a smile, Little Miss March looks as though she might 
blow away and enjoy it. The' drenched figure of April 
frolics in tiny showers. The herald of spring is enjoying 
a Maying. The rustic maid of June is "like roses sweet and fair." The youthful rogue July 
chases the butterfly. The heated little maid of August is charming. The disconsolate little figure 
of September causes us to regret that her last vacation is over. Miss October frolics under the Har- 
vest Moon. Miss November ushers in Thanksgiving Day, and December comes with its "Merry 
Christmas." Each is a touch of genius in the originality of its conception and in its application to 
As might he expected the " tots" at the end of the year are snugly tucked away in a hammock for rest. 



To Every Purchaser of Two Volumes of 
The New Stories in the 

"PRUDY, DOTTY and FLAXIE" 

Style, which all the Little Folks say are 
"Just as Nice." 



PENN SHIRLEY'S NEW STORY 

LITTLE MISS WEEZY'S BROTHER 



By the author of "Little Miss Weezy." Cloth, illustrated, */ 

7S fifints. -V> 



LITTLE MISS WEEZY 

Illustrated, 75 cents. 

In which bright children are shown with their quaint sayings 
and amusing doings. "Written by the sister of Sophie May. 



LITTLE CANARY STORIES 



By Mrs. M. A. Osgood. 4 volumes, illustrated. Price 75 cents 
each. Sold separately. 

Little Canary Herself Little Canary's Cousin Eugene 

Little Canary's Daisy Little Canary's Black Cato 

Four of the nicest books ever written for little folks. There 
are many things to make them laugh. The funny sayings of 
"Black Cato," and "Wee Daisy and Little Canary. Many 
things to make them wonder, and many more to make them 
happy. 



We will send any two volumes of the "Little Miss Weezy " 
or "Little Canary" Books, postpaid by mail, on receipt 
of One Dollar and Fifty Cents, or one copy of the 
Sepiatint Calendar sent on receipt of Fifty Cts. 

Illustrated Catalogues of a long- list of Holiday Books 
mailed free. 




4 Once there was a dandy." 

— Little Miss W$ezy. 



LEE AND SHEPARD Publishers Boston 



Painting Outfit for Our Little Ones Free!! \ 



How to Learn to Draw and Paint in Water f 
Colors without a Teacher. 




The foundation of this system of instruction -which is 
amusing as well as instructive, is a little book entitled 

"Introductory Lessons in Drawing and Painting in 
Water Colors," 

which explains everything which is necessary to he done for 
one to learn, that is," one is told how to do it and he must prac- 
tice until he can do it. The book is the instructor and practice 
the teacher. If one wishes to take lessons from a teacher, this 
book will prepare him the better for so do ng. Every one in 
beginning to paint in water colors puts the colors on in patches, 
streaks and daubs. This book shows how all that may be 
avoided, and how a flat even tint can be obtained. 
Price, 50 cents, postage paid. 




The above box contains the following ten moist colors : In- 
digo, Vermilion, Cobalt% Gamboge, Prussian Blue, Crimson 
Lake, Vandyke Brown, Yellow Ochre, Sepia and Light Red, 
also, three brushes, and directions for mixing these ten colors 
po as to make any colors required. We also wish to say that 
these are not toy colors, but the true artist colors, and will 
be all any beginner will require. 

Price, 50 cents, postage paid. 




In order that those who may not care to learn to draw may 
have an opportunity to practise painting, we have prepared 
the following six books of outline designs. 
SEVFV TIMES ONE ARE SEVEN. Poem by Jean 

Ingelow. And other pictures to paint. Drawn by M. M. B., 

and G. B. J. Size of pictures, 6 X 6i in. Price, 50 cents. 
OUTLINES OF FLOWERS. 

Size of pictures, 6 X 6£ inches . . Price, 50 cents. 
GOOD-NIGHT AND GOOD-MORNING. Poem by Lord 

Houghton. And other pictures to paint. Drawn by M. M. 

B., and G. B. J. Size of pictures, G x 6£in. Price, 50 cents. 
JACK IN THE PULPIT. 

Size of pictures, 6xGJ inches . . Price, 50 cents. 

OUTLINES OF LANDSCAPES. 

Size of pictures, 6x6i inches . . Price, 50 cents. 

TWENTY-FOUR PICTURES from MOTHER GOOSE. 

Size of pictures, 6 x 6£ inches . . Price, 50 cents. 




We offer any of the above as Premiums for new subscribers. 

For One new subscriber and $1.50 we will send the Color Box Free. 
« Two " " 3.00 " " " and one book free. 

" Three " u 4.50 « " " " t wo books free . 

«* Four " " <J.OO «■ « « " three " 

" Six " " 9.00 « " " " all the " 



Each book contains eighteen outline pictures, prepared 
especially for practice work in water color painting, and full 
instructions for painting, 

These books while affording the best practice work for be- 
ginnerSj will be an infinite source of amusement for young peo- 
ple, ano while occupying their time will be instructive. 



RUSSELL PUBLISHING CO., Boston. Mass. 



Habla V. Espanol ? 
arlez-Voiis Francais? 
prechen Sie Peutsch? 
arlate Italiano? 

MEISTERSCHAFT 



You can, at your own home, by 

Dr. RICHARD S. ROSENTHAL'S MEISTERSCHAFT SYSTEM, 

learn to speak fluently either Spanish, French, Italian or German. 
Speciman Copy, Spanish, French, Ge man, or Italian, 25 Cents. 

All subscribers — 85.00 for each language — become actual pupils of Dr. Rosenthal, 
who corrects all exercises, and corresponds with them in regard to any difliculties 
which may occur. 

PUBLISHING CO., Herald Building, Boston, Mass. 



RELIABLE GOODS. 

3n every hand in eacli and all lines of goods we see constant 
d unceasing effort being made to improve on former ideas and 
produce what nearest approaches perfection. The tendency 
the present day has been to a large degree toward the produc- 
>n of the greatest quantity for the least money; but it has been 
und that- it is a false and mistaken idea, and one that bears 
or fruit. Hence the success of the few who have had the 
resight to see a slow but sure profit in making nothing but 
e best. It is but a few years ago that Ferris Bros, com- 
enced the manufacture of the "Good Sense " corsets and 
rset waists. Their endeavor w-as to build up a trade for the 
ture, and that they have succeeded is shown by their im- 
ense trade, which is continually increasing, and the high 
timation in which the goods are held by the leading dry 
-ods houses throughout the country. "We call attention to 
e ladies' " Good Sense " corset waist which we illustrate, 
is buttoned in front and laced all the way up the back, sizes 
to 30 inches, The waists are made to suit all ages from the 
iby up, and possess many special improvements originated 
id patented by this firm. — Ex. 



wlife 



192 PAGES: 

94 Colored Maps: 

60 Colored Diagrams. 

CONTAINS COMPLETE RAILROAD MAP OF 
EVERY STATE, TERRITORY AND COUNTRY 
IN THE WORLD, WITH STATISTICAL 
TABLES, ETC. 

Flexible covers, gold side stamp and red edges. A marvel of 

cheapness. Sent postpaid, to any address for 25 cents. 

5 copies for $1.00. Postage stamps taken. 

E. B. Goodnow & Co., 

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Vol. IX. 



15S8 

Copyright, 1888, by Russell Publishing Company. 



No. 1. 



A GREAT DAY IN PARIS. 



Fred Barnes and his sister Ella were living; with their father and 
mother at the Hotel du Mont Blanc, in Paris. 

"Where is Fred?" asked Mr. Barnes. 

"Here I am!" shouted that young gentleman, coming out of the 
dining-room, holding a paper bag, which Maria, the waitress, had 
filled with pieces of bread. 

A carriage was engaged, and Mr. Barnes, who spoke French, told 
the coachman to drive on. 

" This is the Fourteenth of July, which is the Fourth of July of 
France. Ninety-nine years ago to-day the people of Paris captured 
the Bastile, — a great prison where men who were against the rulers 
were kept. This was the beginning of the French Revolution. The 
people have celebrated the event to this clay." 

"Is it Independence Day?" asked Ella. 

" It is called the Fete Nationale." 

" We are in the Champs Elysee now. On the other side of the 
river is the Champ de Mars, where about thirty thousand soldiers 
will be reviewed this afternoon," continued Mr. Barnes. 

When the carriage came to the Arc de Triomphe it turned to the 
left, and soon passed into the Bois de Boulogne, which is the great 
park of Paris. 



4 A GREAT DAY IN PARIS. 

It is a very beautiful place, and for an hour the family rode 
through its grand avenues, looked at the two lakes, with bridges 
and boats, saw the waterfall, and ate ice-cream in the Swiss cot- 
tage. 

At last they came to the Jardin d'Acclimatation. This is a big 
word, and the children did not understand it. 

" Tbe name in English would be the Garden of Acclimation," said 
Mr. Barnes. 

"I don't know what that means any better," pouted Fred. 

" Acclimate means to get used to the climate, as you would have 
to do if we moved to Cuba. They bring plants and animals here 
from all parts of the world, and get them used to the climate of Paris, 
if they can." 

They left the carriage, and took a queer hor,se-car to the middle of 
the garden. Here they were much pleased. 

Mr. Barnes took Ella, and Mrs. Barnes, Fred. It required several 
hours to see all the strange creatures, and to visit the stables where 
the finest cows are kept, the milk from which is sold in the city. 

There was an elephant with a houdah, or car, on his back, in 
which were six children. The funniest turnout was a buggjr drawn 
by an ostrich, with two ladies and two children in it. 

Patient camels, with little boys and girls on their backs, amused 
Fred. He and his sister rode on the elephant, in the ostrich buggy, 
and after a team of deer. 

At one of the ponds they fed the swans with the bread Maria had 
given them. Though they were very tired by this time, it was hard 
work for papa and mamma to get them into the carriage. 

They rested till nine o'clock, when papa took them to see the 
dancing in the Rue de Buci. The music was very lively, and a 
gentleman asked any lady he saw to dance with him on the pave- 
ment. 

In the Boulevard St. Michael they saw all the trees hung with 
paper lanterns, of a red and yellow color, so that they looked 
like big oranges. By this time they were tired enough to go to 
bed. 

OLIVER OPTIC. 



WONDERLAND. 

Above in the tree sings a robin, 
I lie here on the ground; 

I wonder how he learned that song, 
And where his wings he found. 




I could become a 

robin, 

And sing the livelong 
day, 

I wonder if things that 

puzzle me 
Would roll like the 

clouds away. 



What is it makes the stars so bright ? 

What makes the sky so blue ? 
Do the angels, I wonder, up in their homes, 

See me as they look through ? 



WONDERLAND. 

And the brilliant rainbow colors. 

After the shower is o'er, 
Puzzle my brain with a wonder, 

Making me wish to see more. 



But God is up in heaven, 
And the robin sings for 

He knows why he made 
all things, 
And made me only a 



PARKEK HAYDEN. 





>..*!>"-■' 




PET IN THE COUNTRY. — I. 

PET'S MISTAKE. 

ET had come into the country to spend the sum- 
mer with her grandmother. She was a very 
happy little girl as she stood on the steps of 
the big old farmhouse in the morning sun- 
shine and wondered how she should begin to 
enjoy her first day. 

" Grandpa said there was something alive 
up at the barn that I might have for my very 
own," she was thinking. " Guess I might as 
well go and see what it is." 

So. clearing three steps with a bound, she 
ran as fast as her fat little legs would carry her toward the barn-yard. 
" Grandpa said it wasn't a chicken," she said to herself, as she passed 
the gray ben scratching away for her twelve peeping chicks. " And 
it isn't a kitten, I know, for there are two up in the laundry already. 
I wonder — oh. there it is ! Oh, you dear, sweet, little thing ! " 

The next minute Pet was scrambling through the bars of the 
barn-yard gate after the prize she had seen in the distance. 

Grandma was hulling strawberries in a cool corner of the sit- 
ting-room, when she heard a queer, squeaky noise, getting louder 
and louder as it came along the hall outside. 

She looked up as the door flew open, and there stood Pet, with 
a torn apron and a very red face, holding tight in her arms a 
little white, squealing pig. 

" grandma, I found the live thing at the barn ! Isn't it 
beautiful ? Isn't grandpa just splendid to give me a dear little 
■pig;?" cried Pet. delighted. 



8 



PET IN THE COUNTRY. 



" Well, of all things ! " said grandma, slowly. Then she sat 
back in her chair and laughed till she cried. When she did 
stop at last, she turned to Pet, who was still standing holding piggy 

and looking very sober, and 
said : — 

"Helen, dear, take the pig 
to the barn, and put it down 
just where you found it, and 
then come back to me." 

When Pet was called 
Helen she knew it meant 
that she must obey at once. 
She walked very slowly back 
to the barn-yard gate, and 
put the little kicking pig 
carefully over the bars. 
When she came into her 
grandmother's room again 
she was crying. 

" Grandpa said I could 
have it," she sobbed, as she 
was lifted up on grandma's 
knee. 

" Not a little pig, dear, 

but something a great deal 

nicer," said grandma, kindly. 

"What is nicer?" asked 

Pet, drying her tears. 

" Why, a dear little dog, 
whose name is Sugar, because 
he is so sweet. Grandpa shall get him for you when he comes 
home. And now have your little hands washed, and come watch 
grandma make the cottage cheese." 

So Pet was comforted, and we shall hear next time what she 
thought of Sugar. 

JESSIE McDEHMOTT. 





WHERE THE CANDLES GO. 

Twink-a-wink, candles, tell me, do, 
Is what my big brother says all true ? 
Do you really go out every night 
And carry away jour soft, pretty light ? 
Twinkle wees, how can you treat me so, 
And leave the room no glimmer nor glow, 
When I fall asleep and believe you're there,— 
Oh, little twink-a-winks, is that fair ? 

Perhaps you slip from your silver stand, 
And glide away gently hand in hand, 
Each one trailing a sweeping white gown, 
And each one tossing a yellow crown. 
With winds and stars at the great sky ball 
Dance away merrily, one and all, 
Till some one comes and pilfers your gold, 
And sends you home drooping, pale, and cold. 



You find it again, though, I confess ; 
The stars must bring it to you, I guess, 
And call you again for more wild play, 
Though you're weaker and smaller every day. 
At last you'll never come back at all, 
But there you'll stay in the moon's high hall, 
Your crowns turned into sparkles of light, 
And your robes to clouds of filmy white. 

MATTIE B. BANKS. 



THE LITTLE ACTORS. 



We never think of seals performing for people to look at them, 
when we know that their home is in the ocean. We should look 
as strange to them as they do to all those little boys and girls 
that see them act their part on the stage. They have become 

quite used to human beings 
now, and lie about the edge 
of the tank, without the 
slightest fear, where one could 
put his hand on them. 

When the performance com- 
mences the seals climb from 
their tank of water upon the 
platform. Then the man that 
took them from the ocean tells 





them to ring bells, which they do by pull- 
ing strings. Oh! such a noise as it makes; one is glad when they 
stop those bells, and take drums and tambourines. The seals 
wait until their teacher says " Ready ! " then they all commence to 
drum with their queer little feet. Think of that, a band of seals, 
with their teacher for a leader ! 



THE LITTLE ACTORS. 



11 



Every seal has a name ; and pretty soon the man called Profes- 
sor says, " That will do, Mrs. Toby. Now, Baby, take a seat in your 
little chair." Baby is a little seal ; so he 
takes it in his hands and puts it 
in the chair, and it sits 





up as properly 

as a child would. 

" Now," says Mr. 

Professor, " please 

sing for the ladies 

and gentlemen ; " and 

he commences to beat time with his little 

whip ; then they all sing. You would laugh to hear them, it 
sounds much like a clog trying to bark, with a very bad cold. 

When they do their parts well, the Professor tosses them a fish, 
which they catch in their mouth without ever missing. While I 
think of it, I will tell you what the Professor said about their ap- 
petites. He told the people that they ate ninety pounds of fish 
each day; that would be more than some boys and girls would 
weigh. 

There is a nice little boat floating about in the tank, and a lit- 
tle girl gets into it. Mrs. Toby has a collar put around her neck ; 



12 



THE LITTLE ACTORS. 



attached to a rope, and away she goes skimming through the 
water, pulling the boat after her. Don't you think that is a lovely 
way to sail ? After Mrs. Toby has shown what a nice tug-boat she 
is, the boat is put aside, and the Professor says, " Now, select part- 
ners for the waltz." The music starts up, and the seals commence 

to waltz, turning; around as thev 
swim. It is very pretty to watch 




them glide through the water in this way. It is such fun to see 
them smoke pipes. " You are all sailors," the Professor said ; 
"wouldn't you like to have a smoke?" 

At this they all gather around him, and he gives Baby a pipe, 
just like the rest ; but Jack has two, because he is a very great 
smoker. No wonder all laughed and clapped their hands to see 
such a sight. Jack swam around on bis back, with both pipes high 
in the air, seeming to enjoy himself like any old smoker. 



THE LITTLE ACTORS. 



13 



The little fellows had done such 
wonderful 

things 




that no one 

was surprised to see 

them play soldier and fire off guns 

and pistols. After 




this 
the owner 
said the per- 
formance was done for 
the day. 

a. s. cox. 




THE GOOD GIANT. 

A giant lives in the forest old, 

When leaves have turned to red and gold ; 

He waves his broad arms in the sun, 

He shakes his head with hearty fun, 

And a merry song he seems to sing, 

While the summer birds are taking wing. 

" Oh ! it's winds blow east, or winds blow west, 

Four little brown eggs in one nest/' 

" I give to all ! " he seems to say ; 

" So gather, gather, all who may. 

Though rough outside, yet peep within, 

The treasures of my gift to win ! " 

Then patters, patters to the ground 

His bounty, while the squirrels bound. 

" Oh ! it's winds blow east, or winds blow west, 

Four little brown eggs in one nest!" 

Before the wintry winds blow keen, 

His rugged hands are empty seen ; 

His head is bare ; he is bent and old, 

And his jolly days are past and told ; 

But the ruddy children shout with glee, 

And thank the kind, old chestnut-tree. 

With it's winds blow east, or winds blow west, 

Four little brown eggs in one nest ! 



GEORGE E. COOPEli. 




THE GOOD GIANT. 




" Where can Eva be, I wonder ? " 

This is what Mamma Brooks said. She looked up from her sew- 
ing-machine ; Eva was nowhere in the room. 

Perhaps she is hiding behind the sofa. But, no ; she is not behind 
' the sofa. She is not creeping on the ceiling, like a fly. She is not 
curled up in the work-basket, like a mouse. She is gone. 

"She is so still that I fear something has happened," said Mamma 
Brooks. She went in search of her little girl. 

Eva was not a noisy child. She could keep as still as a wooden 
clog with no legs when her mother took a nap. But she loved to 
sing and play upon her toy piano. 

Now the house was silent. Why was this ? Where could Eva be ? 
And Tommy, too ! What had become of Tommy ? 

Where would you look for this pair of missing children? 

"I know, — in the pantry," you say. Well, you have a good nose 
for gingerbread, I think. Wrong ! I will not keep you guessing. 
Follow Mamma Brooks ! 

Down the stairs she goes, on tiptoe, oh, so softly ! Hark ! No ! 
That's only Jenny sweeping the kitchen. 

Not in the parlor ; nor in the dining-room. Hush ! Listen at 
Papa Brooks' study-room. Open the door gently. Here they are ! 
Ha, ha ! 

But what is this ? Mamma Brooks stops, and we stop too. She 
smiles, and so we must laugh again. Ha, ha ! 

On the floor is a sheet of music. It is spread out so nicely that it 
might sing itself without wrinkling. 

Little Eva is dancing around it — so grandly, with her skirts 
picked up quite in style. Round and round the music she goes, just 
as if mamma were playing it all on the piano. 



E VA'S DA NCING-LESS OX. 



IT 



"You clear little rogue! " And, hello ! Here is Tommy, riddling 
away with all his might. We do not hear him, for his violin is a 
feather brush, and his bow is papa's cane. 

Hurry up the time, little man ! We'll all dance around the sheet 
of music with Eva. 

One, two, three, and away we go ! 

PENN ANDINCK. 




— ? J? cC 




THE LADY OF THE TRICYCLE. 

My dolly rides a tricycle, 

The doctor said she should, 
And since she does it every day, 

Her health is very good. 

She journeys down the gravel walk, 
She journeys through the hall ; 

Frank says, " Poll ! just about a rod ! " 
'Tis miles to one so small. 

Once puss leaped through the balusters, 

And my poor dolly caught ; 
Frank shouted, "Panther! Call the dogs!" 

He liked that, — I did not. 

But brother pleased me yesterday : 
A wheel-race for a cent 

We had along the garden path, 
And all the people went, — 

(Dressed sticks, you know), and stood beside, 

"Hurrah! Hurrah!" to cry; 
And two men climbed a marigold,' 

To see the race go by. 

My dolly rode most splendidly, 

Nor ever turned her eyes ; 
There was no other wheel but hers, — 

She won the penny prize. 

LAVINIA S. GOODWIN. 




THE LADY OF THE TRICYCLE. 



BETSY'S DOOR-PLATE. 

Betsy was spending the summer at the seashore. Her cousin 
Lucy was there, also, in another part of the hotel. The corridor was 
long, and Betsy was too young to read numbers. In order to find 
cousin Lucy's room she would go through the passage, shouting 



f'^i(i%-Kni, n„ 




" Lucy ! " Lucy told her this would never do, for it disturbed every 
one who had a room near. She must learn the numbers, or get some 
one to show her the room. 

"There!" she cried, rushing into her mamma's room, the other 
day, " I have found a way to know Lucy's room. I am going to tie 
this blue ribbon to the door-knob, and tben I need not call -Lucy!' ' 

In a few minutes she returned quite pleased with her idea. Her 
brother, who was eight years old, thought her plan a very good one. 



BETSY'S DOOR-PLATE. 



21 



When she went to Lucy's room she looked for a door with a blue 
ribbon tied to it. She found it and went in. Lucy was not there, 
but two ladies sat there reading. Betsy sat down very quietly in 
a corner and waited for Lucy to come. The ladies looked at her, 
smiled, and began 
to talk to her. 
They had become 
quite well ac- 
quainted before 
Betsy asked : — 

"Where has 
Lucy gone ? " 

"Who is Lucy?" 
asked the ladies. 

"Why, Lucy 
lives in this room." 

The ladies had 
never heard of 
Lucy, and Betsy 
showed them the 
ribbon on the door. 
She told them of 
her idea of mark- 
ing the door ; but 
it was all news to 
them. They were 
in their own room, 
and knew nothing 
of Lucy. Betsy, 

however, remembered Lucy's number, and the ladies showed her 
where the room was, and invited her to come and see them 
often. 

How did the ribbon get on the wrong door ? Well, that naughty 
brother wished to tease his sister, and as soon as she had tied it on 
Lucy's door he took it off and put it on another one. 

M. A. HALEY. 





lls^ily^ 



ROVER'S STORY. 



My name is Rover. I came from Newfoundland when I was a 
little puppy a year old. That was a long time ago, — as much as 
four years, I should think, — and now 1 am a big dog, and a good 
watch-dog, too. 

When I came here I travelled a long time in a ship, to a city 
they called Boston, and then on a railroad to this place. How 
glad I was to get to my home at last ! 

I found some children to play with, and what good romps we 
used to have together ! 

The baby, Roy, was a great pet of mine. I would let him do 
whatever he liked to me, and never growl or snap at him at all. 



ROVER'S STORY. 



23 



He was only a baby two years old, and didn't know he was 
hurting me. 

Every day, after dinner, he would sit down in front of me and 
pick my teeth with a sharp stick. 

He would say, " Now, Rover, you must have 'our teeth cleaned, 
just like papa." If he hurt me with his sharp point I would get 
up and walk away. 

My master has trained me to help him in a great many ways. 
He sends me to the baker's for the daily supply of bread. The 
baker takes out the money from the basket, which I carry in my 




%w#«\''' r ' J '' ' , ''- ' 



'Sfif-' ** ' -.!; .i**v. 



mouth, and gives me the basket full of bread. I go for the milk 
every evening, and now my master is teaching me to go for the 
letters at the post-office. 

One day I was out walking with the children, when my pet, Roy, 
now eight years old, fell into a little pond. His older brother 
tried to save him, but could not. I jumped in, and, catching the 
little fellow's jacket in my teeth, dragged him ashore. 



24 



THE CHAMOIS MOTHER. 



My master calls me "Hero" now; and he gave me a silver 
collar, with my new name on it, with a fine Latin motto, which 






&HERO 




I will explain to you. It was " Semper fidelis," or " Always 
faithful." 

Don't you think it is a good motto for children, as well as for 
dogs ? 

If you ever come to the place where I live, I hope you will call 
at my house. I should like to show yo\\ my collar. 

AUNTIE MAY. 



THE CHAMOIS MOTHER. 



A hunter on the mountains of Austria saw a chamois with her 
two little ones. He made his way towards them as fast as he 
could, climbing the steep and perilous rocks. 

The mother-chamois saw him. At first she rushed towards him 
with her head lowered, as if she meant to push him off the rocks 
with her horjis. But she soon saw it was useless. 

She turned back, and tried to show her little ones how to leap 
across a chasm to another rock. But they were too young for 
this. They were not strong enough to follow her. 

Poor mother ! The hunter came nearer and nearer. He thought 



THE CHAMOIS MOTHER. 



25 



he was sure of them. She seemed powerless to shield them, or 
get them out of his reach. 

But she would not flee without them. She tried again. She 




■*-rv-s flm't* '^V0 



26 



JACK AND THE PARASOL. 



lay down and reached her fore-foot across the chasm to the rock 
beyond. She looked back to her little ones in an anxious, en- 
treating way. 

They understood her ; they knew there was danger. The}' 
sprang on her back. She leaped with them, — the swift, sure- 
footed chamois. 

The hunter had come almost up to them ; but she made the 
leap, and, once across, the little ones ran by her side. 

Away she fled with them, bounding from rock to rock. Soon 
they were far beyond the hunter's rifle. 

Are you not glad they escaped ? 

MRS. MARY JOHNSON. 




cK. and 

Jke |curacol 



Children, did you ever see a collie ? 
— a great, wise dog, who seems to under- 
stand everything you say to him, and does just what you tell him 
to do. 

Little Jeanie had just such a dog, and I must tell you what hap- 
pened one summer's day. 

He, Jack, had a great many friends among the various dogs in the 
neighborhood. On this especial day of which I am going to tell j'ou, 
one of them, who was running around the house towards the garden, 
began to bark furiously. Jack answered quickly in return, and 
made such a noise that Jeanie let him out at the front door. Then 
she saw him run quickly up to the other dog, and have a little talk. 
For dogs do talk in their own way and language, whatever it is. 



JACK AND THE PARASOL. 



Then Jack ran as fast as he could around to the kitchen door, and 
gave a series of sharp, quick barks, until Dinah, the old black cook, 
opened it, saying : — 

" Lor, honey, what yer barkin' so fur ?' 

Then Jack ran a few steps away, 
and back again to Dinah. He kept 
this up so long that she started 
off after him down the path. 

On he ran, until he 
stopped at the foot 
of a little slope in 
the lawn. There she 
found Jeanie's best 
blue silk parasol, 
rolling from side 
to side, having a 
grand frolic. She 
had left it open on 
the veranda when 
she ran in to play 
with her dolls. 




And Jack's friend had spied it and called to Jack, and told him, 
and he had called Dinah to rescue it. Had it not been for Jack and 
his friend, Jeanie would never have seen her pretty parasol again. 

This is a true story. 



AUNT IDA. 




SEE-SAW. 



I ah up at the top, 
A jolly old fellow, you know ; 
I whistle, and loud the winds 

blow, 
I scatter the ice and the snow ; 
While I sit here as king, 
The boys shout and sing, 
Hurrah for the skates, for Christmas 

and Santa Claus, 
Snow-houses and snow-men battered 
at great loss. 

Down at the other end 
Sits a poor girl with no friend. 
Say that you like me the best, 

boys ! 
Say that I bring you the most 
joys ! 



Oh, dear, does the see-saw go 

down? 
Do the icicles drip from my 
crown ? 
Is the sun shining over the 

hills, 
And melting the ice in the 
rills? 
Are the snow-forts vanishing quite? 
Has the skating dropped out of one's 
sight ? 
Oh, dear, is it true, 
Must I go down to you, 
Yellow-haired girl, with the roses? 




SEE-SAW. 



29 



II. 



- 1 am up at the top ; 
The old fellow who froze you, 
Who rains, hails, and blows you, 
Is down in the valley bemoaning 
My advent with sighing and groan- 
ing, 
I just touch the rills, 
Up spring daffodils ; — 
And the birds in a chorus together 
Rejoice in the soft golden weather. 



Over the meadows I send fairies light, 
Crowned with daisy-chains golden and 
white, 
I scatter violets, pansies, and rosies ; 
Laugh, little lasses, and gather your 
posies ; 




*»*?5 



m 



m 



\ys 



Dance in the sunshine sweet, 
With gayest of glad little feet; 
Feast on the fruits of the summer 
fast flying, 
For now I go down, 
Iu gold, scarlet, and brown ; 
And this is a curious see-saw, my 

dear, 
With a chance to get up just once 
in the year. 



AMANDA M. DOUGLAS. 



LITTLE JOE'S TEMPTATION. 



Mamma Brown had been making tomato figs. Little Joe had 
helped her ; at least he thought he had, for he had tasted the 
figs several times and watched the golden fruit bubble in the rich 
syrup. But he hadn't had half enough, and Mamma Brown said they 

were too rich for little 
boys. But Joe would 
have been glad to try 
it, at least, for once. 

The figs were set 
away in the big, dark 
cupboard off the dining- 
room, where there were 
shelves full of cans of 
preserves and pots of 
jam and jellies. 

What a feast just to 
look at them ! Joe 
would steal in on tip- 
toe, sometimes, when 
mamma was busy, and 
gaze till he would have 
to shut the door and 
run away with his hand 
over his mouth to keep 
from tasting them. 

But, alas ! one day 

he stayed too long, and 

before he knew it he 

was nibbling the fia;s. 

Just then he heard mamma coming. What should he do ? He 

had but a moment to choose, and he squeezed right into the bottom 

shelf of the cupboard and swung to the door. 

Ah, those tempting figs ! And boys are always so hungry ! But 
he would never come near the cupboard again — that was cer- 
tain. 




LITTLE JOE'S TEMPTATION. 



While he was thus thinking, his mother stepped across the dining- 
room and shut the cupboard door — snap ! She went out so quickly 




that he had no time to call out to her. And he heard the front door 
shut, too ! She had gone over to Aunt Helen's, he knew. 



LITTLE JOE'S TEMPTATION. 



Oh, dear ! he could not get out 



And he thought he should 



die if he had to stay there long. He began to feel queer at 
once, and he shouted with all his might, and pounded and kicked 
the door with his brown heels till the jam-pots rattled. Grandma 

was taking a nap up- 
stairs, but she could 
not hear — she was 
deaf. 

It was no use ; he 
must stay there till 
mamma came back. 
And, oh, how slowly 
the old clock ticked ! 
The seconds seemed 
minutes, and the 
minutes, hours. 

But after about half 
an hour he heard his 
mother talking, and 
the next moment she 
came in with Uncle 
Tom. 

Didn't Joe just lift 
up his voice, then ? 
The whole house rang 
to his shouts, and in 
no time, almost, he 
tumbled out of the shelf into his mother's arms, sobbing : — 
" I only wanted to taste a torn — torn — " 
" What, not me, I hope ? " cried Uncle Tom, in mock affright. 
"A torn — tomato n-i-ia;," wailed Joe. 

And then the whole story of his temptation came out. His mother 
talked with him kindly and earnestly, and he felt sure he should 
never, never be so bad again. 




CHRISTINE STEPHENS. 



"Used Up," 

" Tired Out," "No Energy," and simi- 
lar expressions, whenever heard, indi- 
cate a lack of vital force, which, if not 
remedied in time, may lead to com- 
plete physical and nervous prostration. 
Ayer's Sarsaparilla is the best medi- 
cine to vitalize the blood, build up the 
tissues, and make the weak strong. 

" For nearly three months I was con- 
fined to the house. One of the most 
celebrated physicians of Philadelphia 
failed to discover the cause of my 
trouble or afford relief. I continued in 
a bad way until about a month ago 
when I began to take Ayer's Sarsapa- 
rilla. It acted like a charm. I have 
gained flesh and strength and feel ever 
so much better. Shall continue using 
the Sarsaparilla until completely cured." 
— John V. Craven, Salem, N. J. 

"I find Ayer's Sarsaparilla to be an 
admirable remedy for the cure of blood 
diseases. I prescribe it, and it does the 
work every time." — E. L. Pater, M. D., 
Manhattan, Kansas. 

Be sure and ask for 

Ayer's Sarsaparilla. 

PREPARED BY 

Dr. J. C. Ayer & Co., Lowell, Mass. 

Trice $1; sis bottles, $5. Worth $5 a boltle. 




PENCERIM 
»TEEL PENS 

fire the Best. 



in the essential qualities of Durability, 
Evenness of Points and Workman- 
ship. Sample card containing five leading 
styles of Pens sent for trial, on receipt of re- 
turn postage, 2 cents. Ask for card No. 9. 

fflSON, BLAKHAN & CO., 



753 & 755 Broadway, 



- New York. 



DURKEES 



GAU NTLETLB RAN D 

«**« SPICES 
* MUSTARD. 

SOLD ONLY IN FULL WEIGHT SEALED PACKAGES. 

Guaranteed absolutely pure, and warranted to excel 
all others in strength, richness, flavor and cleanliness. 




36 BROMFIELD ST., Boston, Mass. 



Magazine, Newspaper and 
Specialty Advertising. 

Advertisements inserted in any 
publication at publishers lowest 
rates. 

Special attention given to th« 
preparation and illustration of ad- 
vertisements. 

Exclusive Advertising Agents foi 




"OUR LITTLE ONES AND THE NURSERY," 



Bound volumes" 
of 



SALAD 
DRESSING 




WlAl lUrvDUA, publications. 

Specia kr nts SCRIBNER'S MAGAZINE, 
"THE CHAUTAUQUAN." 

" Household," " Cottage Hearth," 
" Babyhood," and 

"Good Housekeeping." 

Correspondence solicited and estimates furnished for any 
desired line of advertising. 

GEORGE A. FOXCBOFT, 

Proprietor. 



MONEY MADE KEEPING HENS. 

Hundreds of farmers who never kept an account, would kill 
every " pesky hen " on the farm, if it was not for the " women 
folks." The women intuitively know that the hens do not "eat 
their heads oft every six months," but properly kept, pay 
better than any other farm animals. 

This is true. A record, simple to keep, so it would be used 
and show the facts in detail, would prove that ev.erv hen paid 
a profit. They cuiud be maue to pay, from one to three dollars 
each. Mr. James L. Burgess, Nashua, N. H., reported to the 
Nashua " Telegraph " that his wite made a clean net profit last 
year of §3o.E>a on eggs alone, from only sixteen hens. He 
thinks her success was largely due to using Sheridan's Condi- 
tion Powder, a much advertised preparation to make hens lay. 

Do your hens pay like that ? Ho you want to learn how to 
make them pay better? Are you in delicate health, and want 
to commence poultry raising for the sake of open air employ- 
ment? If so, get some reliable advice how to do it. An 
enlarged and much improved Poultry liaising Guide has just 
been printed, ft contains practical information and many new 
features, which every person who keeps hens should have ; 
such as records and accounts for each month of the year. It 
also contains a long series of very valuable articles, by A. F. 
Hunter, " How to Make Money With a Few Hens.'' Of him 
the. Lowell, Mass., Journal says: "The most sensible poultry 
literature we have read we find under the name of A. F. Hunter. 
He evidently knows what he is talking about." These two 
features alone are worth ten times the cost of the book ; which 
the publishers, I. S. Johkson & Co., 22 Custom House Street, 
Boston, Mass., send postpaid, for only 25 cents ill stamps, or 
two'25-cent packs of Sheridan's Powder and the book for 60 
cents, five packs $1; a large 2£ pound can of the Powder for 
$1.20 postpaid ; six cans $5, express prepaid. They will send a 
testimonial circular free to any one. 



THE TOY THE CHILD LIKES BEST 

IS THE 




"Anchor" 
Stone 



Blocks, 



real stone, 
three colors. 
& The BEST 
PRESENT for 
'children and 
adults. 
For $1.75 or 
-_. „- $2.00 a good 
**4s'U-^>zs&3 *-'&*'^-^<§£t%$gAm average box. 

Apply for Descriptive Catalogue, sent post-free, to 
F. AD. RICHTER & CO., 

310 Broadway, New York. 



^4£". 



PLEASE REMEMBER THAT 

ESPEY'S FRAGRANT CREAM 

\b tbe finest and best preparation In tbe wond for 
, Chuppetl HandN and Rough Skin. I! tin tbe 

largest Bale, ffives better satisfaction than any 
other article. Beware of imitations claiming to be 
the Baiue tbing or Juet as groc sold everywhere. 

BRADFORD'S 

PENETRATING LINIMENT. 

T\Jo remedy so clean and pure, It penetrates to the cords, 
■^ muscles and joints where the pain is, and where the remedy 
ought to go. Send for circulars. 

For Rheumatism, Sprains, Sore Throat, 
Neuralgia, Stiff Joints, Kidney Affec- 
tions, Headache, etc. 

SURE CURE. For Sale by all Druggists. 

Sample bottle sent free to any address on application to 

THE BRADFORD PENETRATING LINIMENT CO., 

OHELSEA, MASS. 



BROWN'S FRENCH DRESSING. 

The Original. Beware of Imitations. 
PARIS MEDAL ON EVERY BOTTLE 




■*gE!H5 



AWARDED HIGHEST PRIZE AND ONLY 

MEDAL PARIS EXPOSITION, 1878. 

HIGHEST AWARD, NEW ORLEANS EXPOSITION. 

Against all Competitors. 




UNIVERSITY ORGAN S.— 
They Lead the 'World.— *85 to $600. 
Sold Direct to Families. Ho Middlemen. 
Solid Walnnt-SOctaves-Double Couplers. 
Guaranteed for She Years and pent, (AC 
with Stool and Book, forTBlALlNYOUK VVV 
Own Home before tou but. Established 
1859. MARCHAI. & SMITH, 

SS5 East 21st Street. .New York. 



EMERSON 



EVERY PIANO 
FULLY WARRANTED. 



"^7^T-n>»»| 



SEND FOP. CATALOGUE I D I A M ("| 

EMERSON PIANO C0.I lIMWU 
WARERO0MS, KbA.TREMONT ST. 
•BOSTON • MASS ■ 



S"THE DELIGHT OF. EPICURES" ( 

HREWSBURYjV 
®& Tomatoketchup • |j 

f&lnk THE FIRST MANUFACTURED FROM • -i 

Ptk/T^ FRESH FRU/T ■ id 



DELICI0U5 WITH HOT &C0LDCUT5. OYSTER STEWS, FI5H &c. \ 

GIVES A SUPER. OR FLAVOR TO GRAVIES" AMY PREPARATION <" MEAT ' 

P'r Wfl,7sARn «,m 87HUOSON ST.N.V. • 2oz.Bo.He Sent Free 

t.L- riMxttnU ALU. 5kizi?.:?i.\i-:x \ mtm ■>,■; this u'_-. n. -.-,. . 



BARNEY & BERRY 

SKATES 



CATALOGUE FREE. 

BARNEY &. BERRY SPRINGFIELD, MASS 



GROUP REMEDY 



The only medicine known that 
will cure Membranous Croup. 
The proprietor of this medicine 
has used it in his private practice twenty years, and in ••very 
case of any kind of Croup it lias never failed lo 
cure. The remedy is tasteless and harmless. Sample with 
direettons sent free by mail. Price, 50<\ per box. 

*C. A. BEIJDIN, M. D., Jamaica, >*. Y. 



PHILDREN WILL BRUSH THEIR TEETH 

I m witn tlle Child's prophylactic Tooth Brash (made of soft bristles and delicate enough for a 1 year 
^| H old babe) because it cleans all the teeth so perfectly. Every Dentist urges more care for the first 
Maiy teeth. Nothing for cleaning the teeth has ever had the world wide endorsements <>L" this brush. 
^^ Adults use the Prophylactic for natural teeth and The Florence Dental Plate Brush for artificial. 
For children from the age of 7 to 14 a special youths size is made. Descriptive circulars. 

Florence Manufacturing Company, Florence, Mass. 

Adults*, Youths', and Childs' sizes kept by all Druggists and Dentists. 



JOSEPH CI LL0TT5 

STEEL PENS 

Solo By ALL DEALERSThroughoutThe WO R LD 
GOLD MEDAL PARIS EXP0SITION-I87S. 



WHOOPING COUCH 

40 years' test of Delavau's Remedy proves its merit. Quickly 
ispels the whooping, greatly allays and lessens severe paroxi- 
sms of ( coughing — cutting short the disease. Its peculiar 
nti-spasmodic action insures sleep ; and is absolutely harm- 
;ss in effect. "When physicians' or domestic treatment fail, 
ou can rely on "DELAVAU'S." 50C. a bottle. Sold by 
ruggists. Depot Cth and "Wood Streets, Philadelphia, Ta. 



INK 



BLACK 



VIOLET 



PINK 



RED 



GREEN 



You can make it yourself without the slightest trouble, and at a 
Baring of 20O per cent, with "WAXPOLE INK POWDERS, 
■whicri will yield Beveral quarts of the best Ink in the world. 
Package of either color 25 cents. Liberal diecount in lare;e pack- 
apes to parties desiring to make Ink for enle. Used extensively by 
Schools, Banks, Merchants, and Blank Book Manufacturers. Full 
information by circular, free by mail. Address. 
WALPOLE DYE AND CHEMICAL COMPANY, 
* 1 19 Milk St., Boston, Mass., U. S. A. 




GOLD MEDAL, PARIS, 1878. 

BAKER'S 



Warranted absolutely pure 

Cocoa., from which the excess of 
Oil has been removed. It has three 
times the strength of Cocoa raised 
with Starch, Arrowroot or Sugar, 
end is therefore far more economi- 
cal, costing lets than one cent a 
cup. It is delicious, nourishing, 
strengthening, easily digested, and 
admirably adapted for invalids v.a 
well as for persons in health. 
Sold by Grocers eve rywhere. 

W. BAKER & CO., Dorchester, Mass. 




OYS 



Now*s your time to get up clubs 
for our celebrated foods and pro- 
cure a Beautiful Watch — 
Stem Winder and stem 
Petter — Imported Swiss Move- 
ment. Just the watch for hovs. We have in stock a 
large line of premiums for all. For full particulars 
address The Grea* American Tea Co. 
P. O. Box 289. 31 & 33 Vesey St., New York, X. Y. 

BCTDI [66 llVrO Are the BEST. 
rCEnLCOO UIEO SoldbyDri-quists. 



PREPARED 

GLUE. 

She Famous Adhesive of the World. War- 
ranted seven times the strength of 
any other liquid glue. 
// holds like a vice. It mends everything. 

THE STANDARD FOR THIRTY YEARS. 

2-ounce bottle, 25 cents with brush. 

Sold Everywhere. 



PEERLESS DYES Are,el 



Sold by Druggists. 




LADY AGENTS £? m S 

employment at $50 to $100 per 
month selling Queen City Sup- 
porters. Sample outfit free. 
Address Cincinnati Suspender 
Co.,ll E.NInth St.,Cincinnati,0. 



LADIES' BOOTS 
ONLY $2.00. 

The best for the Money made. 
RETAIL 

EVERYWHERE 
FOR 
$3.00. 

On receipt of Two Dollars we will send yon 
by mail, POSTAGE PAID, a pair of these 
Elegant Button Boots, worked bntton-holes, 
In either kid or goat, or glove-top kid-foxed, 
any size yon want. Give us a trial. Address 

UNITED STATES SUPPLY CO., BOSTON, MASS. 

P. O. Box 3348 or Wesleyan Building. 

(tgp"Ref er to the publishers of this magazine aB to 
our reliability. 




CANDY 



Send fl, S2, $3, or S5 for a retail 
box by express of the best candies 
in America, put up elegantly, and 
strictly pure. Suitable for presents. 

Refers to all Chicago. Address 



GUNTHEK, Confectioner, 213 State St., Chicago. 




Its superior excellence proven in millions of homes for 
more than a quarter of a century. It is used by the United 
States Government. Endorsed by the heads of the Great 
Universities as the Strongest, Purest, and most Healthful. 
Dr. Price's the only Baking Powder that does not contain 
Ammonia, Lime, or Alum. Sold only in Cans. 

PRICE BAKING POWDER CO., 

NEW YORK. CHICAGO. ST. LOUIS. 

PccRLESS DTES sou>bydkdqqist& 

DYSPEPSIA — Its Causes and Cure sent free. By 
J. H. MOAXVET, Lowell, Mass., 14 years, City Treasurer. 




&ARE BECOJ!^ 



ONLY WHEN THE LIPS DISPLAY PRETTY TEETH. 

The shells of the ocean yield no pearl that can exceed in 
beauty teeth whitened and cleansed with that incomparable 
Dentrifice, Fragrant 

g CEZOPOMT, 

Which hardens and invigorates the GUMS, purifies and per- 
fumes the BREATH, beautifies and preserves the TEETH, 
from youth to old age. 

One bottle of Sozodont will last six months. 



IT'S ENOUGH TO MAKE A FROG LAUGH! 

GREATEST HIT YET., 
IMMENSE SELLER. 



3 BRIGHT VOLUMES, 
f Wing & Stings, 75c. 
. Paws & Claws, SI.OO 
( Goblins, Giants, &c, SI. 

Mailed on receipt 
of price. 




The BRIGHTEST, JOIXJEST jrVENTT.E HOOKS. Full of the oddest 

pranks and most charming; stories with laugh-provoking: illust rations by the 

Prince of .hivniite Artists. Critics Bay of it: "/( set* mi/ littt> 'Jalka tiild irith dilirjlit." 

—Hon. Clinton B. Fisk. "Don't send me another, for I can't <jet the children to &p<f."— 
R. H. Conwell, D. D. ".1 deW/htrid boo1t."—Phild. Prms. "hxowparnhlt/ nftatand elegant." 
— Hon. S. S. Cox. "Fatcinating a* .Knap and t'nrle Remva.'*— HOP. Howard Crosby. 
AGENTS WANTED. Apply early to HITBRAKO BROS., runs., I'hiln., C'hicniro. or Knnsns City. 



PRflPUFT U/nDlf . —A new and complete work of 
UnUunkl YlUrilX; 112pp.. fully illustrated. Full 
instructions for all kinds of Crocheting in Cotton, Linen, Silk 
and Wool. The most complete hook published. Price 35c, 
postpaid. WESTERN LACE MFG. CO., 218 State Street. 
Chicago, 111. 



The Groat Secret of the Canary Breeders of the Hartz 

BIRD MANNA T^TA^ 

serve them in health. ISO by mail. Sold hv druggists. Di- 
rections free. BIRD FOOD CO., 400 N. 3d St., Pliila,, Pa. 







♦r 




[Copyright 1888, by Russell Publishing Comfanv.J [Entered at the P. 0. at Boston as second-class matter.] 






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CAT AND CANARY . . Mrs. Clara Doty Bates . 

(Illustrated by F. S. Church.) 

WHAT AILED THE BELL M. A. Haley 

(Illustrated by L. D. Norton.) 

BESSY'S DREAM • Grace S. Brown 

(Illustrated by Julia Robinson.) 

A TRUE STORY OF LIONS . . A. S. C 

(Illustrated by A. S. Cox.) 

WHO TOLD ? Mrs. Clara Doty Bates . 

(Illustrated by Louis Meynelle.) 

PET IN THE COUNTRY. — II J. McD 

(Illustrated by Jessie McDermott.) 

A GOOD THANKSGIVING Lavinia S. Goodwin . . . 

(Illustrated by Carl Hirschberg.) 

LITTLE KNITTERS A. E. A 

(Illustrated by Miss A. E. Aldnch.) 

GO TO SLEEP, BABY Frank H. Stauffer . . . 

(Illustrated by Maud Humphrey.) 

BABY BUMBLES AND DOTTY DIMPLE . . Lina Strong 

(Illustrated by Carl Hirschberg.) 

A FOX HUNT Pink Hunter ....... 

(Illustrated by Arthur Bennett.) 

WIDE-AWAKE TOWN Marcia Bradbury Jordan 

(Illustrated by Louis Meynelle.) 

PIP Louise Thrush Brooks . . 

(Illustrated by E. M. Shean.) 



The Illustrative Department under the direction of Mr. George T. Andrew. 

OUR LITTLE ONES AND THE NURSERY, 



One Year ... 
Sixteen Months 



Two Copies, one year 
Three Copies, " 



(MONTHLY.) 
TERMS (in advance). 
. $1.50. Eight Months . . 

2.00. Single Copies . . 

CLUB RATES. 

, $2.80. Four Copies, one year 

4.00. Five Copies, " 



15 cents. 



$5 



Subscriptions: — Change of post-office address can be made by giving the old as well ; 
new address, but not without this information. Notice should be received the first of the preo 
month. 

Remittances are at risk of the publishers only when sent by Postal Order, American Ex 
Order, Check, or Registered Letter. Checks, Drafts, and Orders should be made payable to th 

RUSSELL PUBLISHING COMPANY, BOSTON, MA 



CLEANFAST-BLAGK STOCKIN 



(F. P. EOBINSON CO. DYE. ) 

For Men, Women and Children. Money refunded if they stain or fa 

THE CLEANFAST HOSIERY CO., 

107 State Street, CI 




927 Broadway and 2 West 14th Street, New York ; 

49 West Street, Boston. 







Ale are Giving Away the Loveliest Calendar. 

The retail price of which is SO cts. and the Title of which is 

ALL AROUND THE TEAR 

A charmingly illustrated calendar for 1889. By J. 
Pauline Suntkr. Consists of beautiful original de- 
signs, on heavy board, in sepiatint and gold, gilt edges, 
ornamented with rings and chains in silver, with silk 
tassel, and boxed. 

In the artistic grouping of a year's progress as pre- 
sented in Mrs. Sunter's Sepiatint Calendar a series of 
illustrations of the flight of time form the prominent 
attractive features of this exquisite boudoir almanac in 
which the successive dates of the months appear in plain 
figures on tablets twelve in number and with.other illus- 
trations form a beautiful souvenir. The entrance to 
"all the year round" introduces two rustic "tots "by 
the wayside looking out with curious eyes. Opening the 
cover, we find the winged ringers of " the New Year's 
bells." Then come the emblematic figures of the months. 
The shivering little figure of January bending over the 
fire has a smiling "Happy New Year" for the visitor. 
The extremely youthful lovers of February will provoke 
a smile, Little Miss March looks as though she might 
blow away and enjoy it. The drenched figure of April 
frolics in tiny showers. The herald of spring is enjoying 
Maying. The rustic maid of June is "like roses sweet and fair.'' The youthful rogue July 
aases the butterfly. The heated little maid of August is charming. The disconsolate little figure 
f September causes us to regret that her last vacation is over. Miss October frolics under the Har- 
estMoon. Miss November ushers in Thanksgiving Day, and December comes with its "Merry 
Christmas." Each is a touch of genius in the originality of its conception and in its application to 
t represents. As might be expected the " tots " at the end of the year are snugly tucked away in a hammock for rest. 

To every purchaser of two volumes of "Prudy, Dotty, 
laxie and Flyaway" Stories by Sophie May or the new 
Doks in the same style which the little folks say are 
U JUST AS NICE." 

Here are the new books : 

Penn Shirley's New Stovy 

JTTLE MISS WEEZY'S BROTHER 

By the author of "Little Miss Weezy." Cloth, illustrated, 
75 cents. 

ITTLE MISS WEEZY 

Illustrated, 75 cents. In which bright children are shown 
with their quaint sayings and amusing doings. Writ- 
ten by the sister of Sophie May. 

ITTLE CANARY STORIES 

By Mrs. M. A. Osgood. 4 volumes, illustrated. Price 
75 cents each. Sold separately. 

Little Canary Herself. 
Little Canary's Daisy. 

Little Canary's Cousin Eugene. 

Little Canary's Black Cato. 

There are many things to make them laugh — the 
funny sayings of "Black Cato," Wee Daisy and 
Little Canary — Many things to make them wonder, 
and many more to make them happy. 



We will forward by mail, postpaid, our illustrated cata ' — 
gue of the "Prudy," "Dotty," "Flaxie," and "Flyaway,'' 
ooks from which to select. 

2^^* Any two of the above books sent, postpaid, bymail 
1 receipt of $1.50 with one of the Sepiatint Calendar's 
ee, or one copy of the Sepiatint Calendar separate on 
ceipt of 50 cents. 

Illustrated Catalogue of Holiday Books now ready, 
mailed free. 




" Once there was a dandy." 

— Little Miss Weezy. 



LEE AND SHEPARD, Publishers, Boston. 



)TN1CH0K 



-w 





'HIS world-re- ^ 
nowned magazine 
" for young people and their elders" 
is to have a great programme for the new 
'volume beginning with November, 1888. The editor, Mrs. Mary Mapes 
Dodge, calls it "an all-around- the-world year," because it is to contain a 
great number of stories and papers about the world in general. Of course 
the hulk of the contents, as heretofore, will relate to American subjects; but 
young America is always glad to learn what goes on in the world outside, and 
these stories and descriptive papers are not of the dry geographical order, and 
they will be strikingly illustrated by the best artists. We have space here for 
only a few of the most prominent announcements. 

America. Asia. 

"Little Saint Elizabeth," by Mrs. Yan Phou Lee writes of " Boys and 
Burnett, author of " Little Lord Faunt- Girls in China," and "Some of John 




leroy"; "The Routine of the Repub- 
lic," the practical workings of the 
Government; "The I naf of Peace," 



Chinaman's Inventions "are described. 
Mrs. Holman Hunt will contribute a 
series on Home Life in the East; and 



t#^ 



by Octave Thanet; a serial story for there will be papers on Siam and Japan, 

girls by Sarah Orne Jewett; "The including "Ten Weeks in Japan" 

Young Naturalists," " How to Become and " Seeing the Real Mikado." 

a Curve-Pitcher," "College Athletics," •- ■ 

"Amateur Photography," " Boys and *»TrSCa. 

the National Guard," "The Girls' "The White Pasha," by Noah 

Crusade," Indian Stories, School Brooks, a sketch of Henry M. Stanley; 

Stories, Scientific Papers, etc. " How an American Family lived in 

"The Bells of St. Anne," a serial Egypt"; "Sailor-Boy Dromios," a 

about Canada. South American Stories, story of the siege of Alexandria; "A 



'A Railroad in theClouds "; " Indians 
of the Amazon," by Mrs. Frank R. 
Stockton, etc. 

Europe. 



French Flat in the Wilds of Africa." 

Australia. 

An illustrated series imparting much 
novel and amusing information con- 



#© 

^p^ 



$ & 



w w 



Life in Norway, by H. H. Boyesen. cerning its history, life, etc. 
"Holland and the Dutch," by Mrs. »••*» 1^4,;. On.<vi~.-*~ 
Mary Mapes Dodge. "The Queen's The Arctic Regions 

Navy," by Lieut. F. Harrison Smith, and the Sea. 

R. N. " The Winchester School," " How We made the Farthest 
"English Railway Trains." French North," an important serial of adven- 
papers include " Ferdinand de Les- ture and experience in the Arctic Re- 
seps and his two Ship Canals," and gions, by General A. W. Greely; "A 
"Journal of Marie Therese." There Dash with Dogs for Life or Death," by 
are several stories about Germany, Lieut. Schwatka; "A Modern Middy," 
stories of Russian children by David "The Cruise of the Constellation," " A 
Ker, papers on Italian art, etc., etc. Submarine Ramble," etc., etc. 

Subscription price, $3.00 a year; 25 cents a number. Subscriptions are 
received by booksellers and newsdealers everywhere, or by the publishers. 
Remit by P. O. money-order, bank-check, draft, or registered letter. The 
new volume begins with November. December is the Christmas Number. 



tl /t is simply tli£ 

ideal young people' s 

magazine, and holds 

the first place." 

— Boston Journal. 



KWl. ) PUBLISHED BY 

THE CEHTURY-CO 




Atfi 



"This prince ofju- 
\vemles knits together 
: the children of the ; 
A ngh-Saxon world." j, 

'■■. ■.:,■!- nr-\v r H^S :anLe ae 









fa 



S& 



Ik 



7 



Susan Coolidges Story Books. 



"Not even Miss Alcott apprehends child nature with finer sympathy, or pictures its nobler traits with more skill' 

— Boston Daily Advertiser. 



A. New Story. 




SPECIMEN PICTURE FROM CLJVER." LITTLE ROSE AS CUriD, 
SENGER FROM HYMEN'S EXPRESS COMPANY. 



CLOVER, 

A Sequel to 

What Katy Did. 

What Kat y Did at School. 

What Katy Did Next. 

The Katy books are great favorites with all young 
folks, and "Clover" will be still more so with some 
surprises in the lives of Katy and Clover Carr. 

A Complete List of 

Susan Coolidge's Stories. 

The New- Year's Bargain; Mischief's Thanksgiv- 
ing; What Katy Did ; What Katie Did at School; 
What Katy Did Next; Clover; Nine Little Gos- 
lings; Eye-bright; Cross-patch; A Round Dozen; 
A Little Country Girl. Illustrated. II vols. Price, 
$1.25 each. 



SETS OF POPULAR BOOKS FOR GIRLS AND BOYS 

Any Story in the List inay be had Separately* 



MISS ALCOTT'S LITTLE WOMEN SERIES. 

8 vols. $1.50 each. "Little Women," " Little Men," "Eight 
Cousins," "Under the Lilacs," "An Old-fashioned Girl," 
" Jo's Boys," " Kose in Bloom," " Jack and Jill." 

MISS ALCOTT'S AUNT JO'S SCRAP BAG. 

6 vols. $1.00 each. " My Boys," " Shawl-Straps," "Cupid 
and Chow-Chow, " "My Girls," "Jimmy's Cruise in the 
Pinafore," "An Old-fashioned Thanksgiving." 

MISS ALCOTT'S SPINNING-WHEEL STORIES. 

4 vols. §1.25 each. " Spinning- Wheel Stories," "Proverb 
Stories," "Silver Pitchers," "A Garland for Girls." 

H. H.'S. CAT STORIES. 

By Helen Jacksox. 3 vols. §1.25 each. Three volumes 
in one, $2.00. " Letters from a Cat," " Mammy T*ittleback 
and her Family," " The Hunter Cats of Connorloa." 

JEAN INGELOW'S STORIES. 

5 vols. SI. 25 each. "Studies for Stories," "A Sister's Bye- 
hours," " Mopsa the Fairy," "Stories told to a Child," 
First Series; " Stories told to a Child," Second Series. 

FLORA L. SHAW'S STORIES. 

■4 vols. Sl.OO each. " Castle Blair," "Hector, 
Browne," "A Sea Change." 



'Phyllis 



EDWARD E. HALE'S STORIES. 

5 vols. $1.00 each. " Stories of War," " Stories of the Sea," 
" Stories of Adventure," " Stories of Discovery," " Stories 
of Invention." 

MRS. MOULTON'S BED-TIME STORIES. 

4 vols. $1.25 each. "Bed-time Stories," "More Bed-time 
Stories," " New Bed-time Stories," " Firelight Stories." 

JOLLY GOOD STORIES. 

3 vols. $1.25 each. "Jolly Good Times." by P. TnoitNK; 
"Mice at Play," by Nicil, Fokest; "Jolly Good Times at 
School," by P. Tnoitxii. 

THE BOY'S ROMANCE LIBRARY OF LAND AND 
SEA STORIES. 

3 vols. $1.50 each. "The Boy Knight," by G. A. Hevtv; 
"The Two Cabin Boyy," by Louis Rousselet; "Red 
Cloud, the Solitary Sioux," by LrEUTicxAzs'T-COLO.NELi 
Butler; " Jack Archer," by G. A. IIentv. 

MRS. EWING'S STORIES. 

9 vols. Price, $1.00 each. "Six to Sixteen," "A Great 
Emergency," etc., "Jan of the Windmill," "We and the 
World," "Jackanapes," ai.d other stories, with a life of 
Mrs. Kwing, " Mrs. Overthewnys Remembernnces," etc., 
" Melchoir's Drenm." etc., " Lob Lie-by-the-Fire," etc., "A 
Flat-iron for a Farthing." 



Send for our Descripth'e Catalogue {free). Our books are sold by all booksellers 

Ushers ', on receipt of price. 



Mailed^ postpaid, by the pu&- 



ROBERT'S BROTHERS, Boston. 



PtiBIilSHED THIS ffi0NTHN> 



Zigzag* Journeys in the Antipodes. 

This new volume in the perennially popular series takes the reader to Siam, and with delightful illustration 
and anecdote, tells him of the interesting animal worship of the country. i vol., small quarto, illumi- 
nated board covers and linings, $1.75; cloth, beveled and gilt, $2.25. Over a quarter of a million of 
this series have already been sold. 

Great Grandmother's Girte in New Mexico. 

By Elizaretk W. Champney, author of "Three Vassar Girls" series. This is the second volume of this 
delightful series, describing incidents in the life of a quaint little maiden who lived in the time of the 
Spanish adventures. Illustrated by "Champ." i vol., Svo, cloth, gilt, $2.50. 

The Sailor Boys of '61. 

By Prof. J. Russell Soley, author of "The Boys of 1S12," etc. This volume contains an accurate and vivid 
account of the naval engagements of the great Civil War, and the deeds of its heroes. Elaborately and 
beautifully illustrated from original drawings. 1 vol., quarto, cloth, $2.50. 



Hunting 1 in the Jungle, 



With Gun and Guide. From "Les Animaux Sauvages," by Warren F. Kellogg. An exciting and amusing 
series of adventures in search of large game — gorillas, elephants, tigers, and lions — fully illustrated with 
over a hundred original drawings by the celebrated Laucere, engraved on wood by the best modern book 
illustrators. 1 vol., Svo, cloth, $2.50. 



Endymion. 



By John Keats. Illustrated by W. St. John Harper. The Gift Book of the Year. The beautiful 
poem is now presented in the superb setting it deserves, being illustrated by numerous photogravures 
from original drawings made especially for this art edition, by W. St. John Harper, and printed in deli- 
cate tints in connection with the text. It has an appropriate cover, in novel style, and altogether is the 
most artistic triumph in bookmaking ever achieved. 1 vol., royal quarto, cloth, $15.00. 



Fairy Lilian. 



By Alfred (Lord) Tennyson, together with twelve of his most popular short poems, illustrated under the 
supervision of George T. Andrew, by the most distinguished artists of the day. The volume is a marvel 
of the printer's art, showing on each page a delicate border in tint surrounding the illustration printed in 
black. The cover is elaborately gilt after a design by W. L. Taylor. 1 vol., quarto, cloth, full gilt, $6.00; 
full seal morocco, $$.00; full tree calf, gilt edges, $13.50. 

The Bugle Song 

And other poems. By Alfred (Lord) Tennyson. Fully illustrated by the best American artists. 1 vol., 
small quarto, cloth, full gilt, $1.50; full American seal, gilt edges, $2.50. 

Recent Italian Art. 

A portfolio of 16 beautiful photo etchings from the best paintings of modern Italian artists like Amos Cassi- 
oli, Gaetano Chierici, and Tito Conti, with descriptive text by Walter Rowlands. 1 vol., folio 
(12 x 17), cloth, in a box, $7.50. 

The Goupil Gallery of Photogravures. 

This charming collection of French Masterpieces presents ten photogravures by Goupil ct 'Cie of Paris, from 
recent Salon favorites accompanied by descriptive text by a well-known art critic. 1 vol., large 
quarto, cloth, beveled and full gilt, $3.75. 



For sale by all booksellers, or sent, prepaid, on receipt of price, by 

ESTES AND LAURIAT, Boston.] 



Books for Our Young Folks. 

Selected from Cassell & Company's Complete Catalogue, which will be sent free to any 

address on application. 

BY POPULAE ^JMERICAlSr -AUTHORS. 

-^ Each volume fully illustrated. Price $1.25 each. 

BEHIND TIME, by George Parsops Lathrop. 

THE STORIES GRANDMA TOLD, By Mary D. Brine. 

THE CHILDREN OF THE COLD, by Lieut. Frederick Schwatia. 
ECHOES FROM STORY-LAND, by Mary P. Brine. 

OUR CHILDREN AND THEIR FRIENDS, by Evelyn Shepherd. 




Above 5 volumes in a neat box, price, $6.25. 



BIBLE TALKS ABOUT BIBLE 
PICTURES. 

By Jennie B. Merrill and F. 
McCready Harris. Illustrated 
by Gustave Dorc and others. I 
vol., large quarto, with beautiful 
Chromo cover done in ten colors. 
$1.25. 



LEGENDS FOR LIONEL. 

In Pen and Pencil. By Wal- 
ter Crane. Done in colors. 
Boards, $2.00. 




THE PALACE BEAUTIFUL. 

A Charming Story for Girls. 

By L. T. Meade, author of "A 
World of Girls," "The House of 
Surprises," f *Scamp and I," etc. 
With 8 full-page Plates. 348 pages, 
crown, Svo ; cloth, $1.50. 



A DOZ EN AND ONE, 
or, The Boys and Girls of Polly's Ring. 



By Mary D. Brine. In one 
elegant quarto volume. Chromo 
covers. Price, $1.50. 



MOTHER aOQSE. 

Elegantly done in Lithographic Colors. Music by E. T. Lane; Illustrations by J. L. Webb. New and 
unique binding. Price, $2.50. 

THE CREAT RIVER SERIES. 



By Edward S. Ellis, A. M. 

Original stories. Fully illustrated. i6mo, cloth. Price $1.25 
per volume. 

DOWN THE MISSISSIPPI. 

LOST IN THE WILDS. 



UP THE TAPAJOS. 




Complete Catalogue of Holiday Books sent free to any address on application. 

CASSELL <& COMPANY, Limited, 

104 and 106 Fourth Avenue, New York. 



;, Habla V. Espanol ? 
Parlez - Votis Francais ? 
Sprechen Sie Peutsch ? 
Parlate Italiano? 



I IN" TIBET TX7":e:BI£:S 

You can, at your own home, by 

Dr. RICHAKD S. ROSENTHAL'S MEISTERSCHAFT SYSTEM, 

learn to speak fluently either Spanish, French, Italian or German. 
Speciman Copy, Spanish, French, Ge man, or Italian, 25 Cents. 

All subscribers — $5. 00 for each language — become actual pupils of Br. Rosenthal, 
who corrects all exercises, and corresponds with them in regard to any difficulties 
which may occur. 



MEISTERSCHAFT PUBLISHING CO., Herald Building, Boston, Mass. 



BIND "OUR LITTLE ONES. 



)) 



For binding and preserving, in attractive form, the yearly volumes of "Our Little Ones,"' a cover has been 
prepared, which, for neatness, originality, and beauty, is in keepingwith the contents of "the handsomest magazine 
published." It is of rich scarlet English cloth ; on the front of the cover is the title "Our Little Ones " in heavy 
gold and black, surmounted by a bunch of beautiful embossed daisies and other wild flowers, with a full-length 
Dicture of 

MISS TODDLEDUMS 

(who is well known to our readers) in gold. The back also bears the title "Our Little Ones" with the portrait of 
a model little one in gold, with floral decorations and emblems in black and gold. 

The October number completed the eighth volume, and with it will be found a complete table of contents for 
the year, to be bound in with the twelve numbers. 

This handsome cover, with linings, will be sent to any address, 

BY MAIL, POST-PAID, FOR 50 CENTS. 

If it is not convenient for you to reach a bookbinder, then you may send your numbers to us, and we will 
have them bound for you in the cover we have described, and return the volume to your address. This will cost 
you, for the cover, 50 cents; for binding, 50 cents; so that if you wish the binding done here, send along your 
twelve numbers, with your full address, enclosing $1.00 to pay the whole bill. 

RUSSELL PUBLISHING CO., 36 Bromneld St., Boston. 

Our Club Rates with other Publications. 



Any person desiring to subscribe to other publications in connection with Ocr Little Ones can do 
so at a greatly reduced rate, by sending direct to this office. We will club Odr Little Ones with any publica- 
tion, but have only space enough to mention a few of the more prominent: 



American Agriculturist. 



: 50 



Scribner's Magazine 34 00 

Harper's Monthly Magazine 4 75 

Harper's "Weekly 4 75 

Harper's Bazar 4 75 

^arper's Young People 3 03 

The Century 5 00 

St. Nicholas 4 00 

Atlantic Monthly 4 75 

Lippineott's Magazine 4 00 

"Wide Awake 3 75 

Golden Days 4 CO 

American Teacher 2 25 

New England Journal of Education 3 50 

Christian Union 4 00 

Babyhood 2 53 

Good Housekeeping 3 50 

The prices given above are for Oort Little Ones and any of the publications named, for one year, includ. 
ing postage on both. If the paper or magazine you wish to club with Ocr Little Ones does not appear on 
this list, then write to us for terms, before subscribing. Both publications must beordered at the same time 
but both need not necessarily go to one address, or commence with the same issue. 

RUSSELL PUBLISHING COMPANY, 

36 Bromfleld Street, Boston, Mass 



Christian at "Work $ 4 00 

Independent 4 00 

Scientific American 4 00 

Sunday School Times 3 00 

Demorest's Monthly 3 00 

Arthur's Home Magaziue 3 00 

Godey's Ladies Book 3 00 

Peterson's Magazine 3 ™ 



The Cottage Hearth 2 B0 

The Household 2 00 

Chatterbox 

Littell's Living Age ' 

Dorcas 

St. Louis Magazine 



00 
S 50 
2 25 
2 00 



CHRISTMAS CARDS BY MALL. 



OUR CARD PACKAGES for 1888 and 1889 are ready. The assortment 
is large and tine, embracing the beat cards that can be obtained. These 
packages will be found -wonderful bargains. We advise early orders, as 
many will certainly desire to send a second order. 

We will send a complete set of the first six packages for $3.50, and 40 cts* 
for postage and registering, and of the complete 10 sets for $»5.50, and 5ft 
cents for postage and registering. 

No. 1.— For 50 cents and 4 cents for postage : 17 of T,, Prang & Co., 

and other fine Christmas Cards, together with a Double Fringed Card 

and a handsome Birthday Card. 
No. 2.— For 50 cen's nnd 4 cents for postage : 10 large and finer cards 

from the above Publishers, also, a fine Frosted Card and a card cut ia 

form of a Leaf . 
No. 3 —For SI r and 6 oen'B for postage : A choice selection of 25 

Beautiful Cards, of L. Prang & Co's, also a souvenir booklet, and a 

fine Satin Card. 

No. 4.— For SI. 00 and 8 cents for postage : A selection of 10 of our 
Largest and Finest Cards, including 1 of Prang's Celebrated Prize 
Cards, together with a Beautiful Folding Calendar for 1889. 

No. 5.— For SI. 00 and 10 cents for postage: 10 Double Fringed 

Cards (not folded) each in a separate envelope, together with a fine 
Book Mark Card mounted on sat' v. ribbon, and a handsome Folding 
Card, 

No. 6.— For 25 cents and 2 cents for postage: 10 Prang's, Tuck's, 

Ward's, and other beautiful cards. 
No. 7.— For SI. 00 and 8 cents for postage: 7 Souvenir Books, with appropriate selections from best authors; retail 

price, 25 and 50 cents each, and an enlarged Lithographic Card of the above cut by L. Prang & Co. 
So, 8.— For Sl.00 and 6 cents for postage: 7 of Prang's best Prize Cards, celebrated the world over as the finest cards ever 

produced. 
No. 9.— BIRTHDAY PACKET. For 50 cents : 17 Fine Cards of Prang's or Tuck's. 
No. 10.— SUNDAY SCHOOL PACKET. For 50 cents : 20 Cards of Marcus Ward's, Praug's Cards, assorted. 

STAMPS OR POSTAL NOTES RECEIVED. 

Hand-Painted Cards, Pearl Cards and other Novelties at 10, 15, £5, 50, 75 cents and $1.00 each, for Christmas, Birth- 
day or Anniversary, which will be selected with care for different tastes and ages as specified. 
Chromo-Iiithograph. Cards by L. Prang & Co. of the above cut and verse, and Companion cards per doz., postpaid, $1, 

To TEACHERS ONLY. 

50 Marcus Ward's, Prang's, and other beautiful cards, no two alike, for $1.00 and 8 cents for postage. Better assortment, 
$2.00 and 10 cents for postage. A very choice Selection, no two alike, $3.00 and 20 cents for postage and registering. 
Every Packet will be sent %n p isteboard Protectors and heavy envelope wrappers for safe transmission. The above offers in- 
clude our Easter Card Packets for 1889. These will be ready about March 1st. Envelopes for mailing 12 cts. for each packet. 

LOWEST PRICES IN THE UNITED STATES. 
DADCD DV TUT DHHUn We are manufacturers of the Beacon Hill Linen Paper (no better or more ele- 
r Ai til D T I IS L r UUllLI < ^ ant P a P er ca11 ne ma de). Selling direct from mills to the consumer, we are able 
ni kii ui k- ivwiiwi always to give lowest possible prices. Sample sheets of paper and envelopes, with 

prices and number of sheets to a pound, sent on receipt of 15 cents, and special prices to those taking orders for these papers 
with our card packets. 

H. H. CARTER & KARRICK, No. 3 Beacon Street, Boston. 




3 NEW VOLS 

Giants & Goblins, 
Wings & Stings, 75c. 
Paws & Claws, $1. 



Mailed 

Postage 

Free, 




ACENTS WANTED TO SELL 
Tbe BRIGHTEST, JOLLIEST JUVKMI-E 
BOOKS. Full of the oddest pranks and most 
charming stories witb laugh-provoking Pictures 
by tbe I'rince of Juvenile artists. A CiKEAT 
HIT! Over 10,000 sold. Critics sav of it: 

"It self! mg filth folks rcild with delight ." — Hon. Clinton 
B. Fisk. "Don't send me another, Jar I can't get the chil- 
dren to bedy—lt.. H. ConweH, D. D. "A delightful 
hook." — Phila. Press. "Incomparably neat and elegant." 
— Hon. S. S. Cox. "Fascinating as jEsop and Uncle 
Remus."— #011. Howard Crosby. 
HUBBARD BROS., ftittlpbiu, Chicago, or Kan: ■_ - City. 



IN THE SELECTION OF 

A CHOICE GIFT 

For Pastor, Parent, Teacher, Child, or 
Friend, both elegance and usefulness will ibe found 
combined in a copy of Webster's Unabridged. 




Besides many other valuable features, it contains 

A Dictionary 

of 118,000 Words, 3000 Engravings, 

A Gazetteer of the World 

locating and describing 25,000 Places, 

A Biographical Dictionary 

of nearly 10,000 Noted Persons, 

A Dictionary of Fiction 

found only in Webster, 

All in One Book. 

3000 more Words and nearly 2000 more Illus- 
trations than any other American Dictionary. 
.) Sold by all Booksellers. Pamphlet free. 

G. & C. MERRIAM & CO., Pub'rs, Springfield, Maaa 



m rJ$' a Attractive Books 

I I I ^ • por Yountf people. 



23^.4 UTIF ULL Y ILL USTRATEJD. 



Boys Book of Indoor Games and Recrea- 

tions. Edited by G. A. Hutchison. 700 illus- 
trations. Small 4to, cloth, $175. 

It is especially a boy's book, calculated to afford both 
pleasure and profit. It treats of those topics in wkich 
boys take particular interest. There are chapters on 
games and sports of all kinds; the boys* workshop ; how 
to build boats, etc. ; musical instruments, toys ; conjurers 
and conjuring; ventriloquism; and pleasant and profit- 
able occupations for spare hours. 

The Girls Own Indoor Book. 

Edited by Charles Peters, with over 150 illustra- 
tions. Small 4to, cloth, $1.75. 

Containing practical helps to girls on all matters re- 
lating to their material comfort and moral well-being. 
Special attention is paid to home life and self-education. 
The writers are recognized specialists in their particular 
work, so that every girl, reading the book will derive 
help of an important character. 




Prince Little Boy and other Tales out of 

Fairyland. By S. Weir Mitchell, M. D. Illus- 
trated by F. S. Church and H. Siddons Mowbray. 
4to, cloth extra, $1.50. 
Dr. Mitchell is not only gifted with the power of en- 
tertaining the mature and thoughtful by his novels, 
scientific works, etc., but has rare faculty of pleasing 
children by his wonderful stories of fairy-land. The 
illustrations are very captivating, being designed under 
the special approval of the author. 

" The brightness and best of the merry new company of children's 
books." — Philadelphia A mcrican. 

" No child will fail to enjoy and appreciate the book." — Ameri- 
can Bookseller. 

" The stories are delightful and make a most acceptable book for 
children." — N. }'. Art Amateur. 



Ida Waugh's Alphabet Book. 

" For little ones who, if they look, 
Will find their letters in this book." 

Verses by Amy E. Blanchard. Attractively illus- 
trated, and printed in two colors, on heavy plate 
paper. Large 4to, 9x11 inches. Bound in illumi- 
nated cover, $1.00. 

This beautiful volume will make that task of child- 
hood, "learning the letters," a joy to the mother who 
teaches, and a delight to the child who learns. 

" It cannot help being a favorite with the little ones." — The Perot- 
sylvanian. 

"One of the most charming books for the little ones of the nnrserv 
that has been issued." — Bosto?i Home Journal, 

"It makes an admirable gift-book for a little friend." — Germaniovm 
Telegraph. 

" For excellence of design and beauty of execution this must rank 
among the very best juveniles of the season. — Chicago Dial. 



INTERESTING AND INSTRUCTIVE. 

Animals ?.nd Birds. 

Their Homes and Their Habits. 2 volumes in 
one. 4S full-page illustrations. Cloth, $1.75. 

Young Folks' Science in Story. 

By Uncle Lawrence. Including Young Folks* 
Ideas, Young Folks' Queries and Young Folks' 
Whys and Wherefores. Three volumes in one. 
Thick 4to, cloth, $2.50. 

Our Young Folks' History of the Roman 

Empire. By William Shepard. Illustrated. Svo, 
extra cloth, $2.50. 

Our Young Folks' Plutarch. 

Plutarch's Lives simplified for Young People. By 
Rosalie Kaufmann. With Illustrations. Svo, 
extra cloth, $3.00. 

Our Young Folks' Josephus. 

The Antiquities of the Jews and the Jewish Wars, 
simplified for Young People. By William Shep- 
ard. With illustrations. Svo, extra cloth, $2.50. 



If not obtainable at your Booksellers, send direct to the Publishers, who will forward the books, postpaid, tm 

receipt of the price. 

j. b. LdppiNeerr company, 

715 and 717 Market Street, Philadelphia. 




CAT AND CANARY. 




155S 

Copyright, 1888, by Russell Publishing Company. 



No. 2. 



GAT AND CANARY. 



In a golden cage 

Hung a gold canary ; 
And gray pussy-cat, 
Discovering that, 

Delighted was — very. 




She said to herself, 
" I am tired of mice, 

And some little thing, 
With a tender wing, 
Would taste so nice ! 




So, ready to leap, 

She crouched on the floor, 
With green eyes, when 
Little Jane just then 

Came in at the door. 



36 CAT AND CANARY. 

And she saw gray-puss, 

So wicked and wary, 

With long tail swinging, 

And ready for springing 

On the gold canary. 

Now, what did puss get ? 

Would you like to hear ? 
The bird — perhaps ! 

No ! good, sound raps 
Upon either ear. 

And away she fled 

With a loud me-ew, 

And Jane grew merry, 

And the gold canary 

Grew merry too. 

MRS. CLARA DOTY BATES. 





uA =__ 



{tfAt All LED 



TM 



ILL 



It was the first day of school after a 

>' vacation. The children were playing in the yards. 

The teachers sat at their desks waiting for the bell to strike 
to call the children to the different rooms. The hands of the 
different clocks pointed to a quarter before nine. 

The bell was a sort of gong, fastened to the outside of the building, 
and the master of the school could ring it by touching a knob in the 
wall near his desk. It was now time to call the children into school. 
The master pulled the bell and waited. Still the merry shouts i 
could be heard in the school-yards. Very strange ! The 
children were so engaged in play that they 
could not hear the bell, he thought. 
Then he pulled it more vigorously. 
Still the shouts and laughter 
tinued. 

The master raised his win 
clapped his hands, and pointed 
the bell. 

The children rushed into line 
like little soldiers, and waited 
for the second signal. The 
teacher pulled and pulled, 
but there was no sound. 
Then he sent a boy to tell 
each line to file in, and 




38 



WHAT AILED THE BELL. 



he sent another boy for a carpenter to tind out if the bell-cord was 

broken. 

What do you 
think the carpen- 
ter found ? A little 
sparrow had built 
its nest inside the 
bell, and prevented 
the hammer strik- 
ing against the bell. 
The teacher told 
the children what 
the trouble was, 
and asked if the 
nest should be 
taken out. There 
was a loud chorus 
of " No. sir." 

Every day the 
four hundred chil- 
dren would gather 
in the yard and 
look up at the nest. 
When the little 
birds were able to 
fly to the trees in 
the yard, and no 
longer needed a 
nest, one of the 
boys climbed on a ladder and cleared away the straw and hay so that 
the sound of the bell might call the children from play. 

M. A. HALEY. 





BESSY'S DREAM. 

Dear little Bessy, all tired with play. 
Sat down to rest on a warm, sunny day, 
Under the shade of an apple-tree, 
By the side of the brooklet growing. 
She wore a white bonnet and pink gingham dress, 
And what a sweet picture was dear little Bess, 
With her sunny hair, so wild and free. 
Over her shoulders flowing ! 



The murmuring brook, as it glided by, 
Whispered to Bessy a sweet lullaby ; 

Her eyes grew heavy, her curly head dropped, 
And soon she was fast asleep. 
She scarcely had slept but a moment or two, 
When three little fairies, all dressed in bright blue, 
Softly down from the apple-tree hopped, 
And into her eyes did peep. 



40 



BESSY'S DREAM. 




Finding her sleeping, they made a slight sound, 
And soon all the fairies came hov'ring around. 

They took off her gingham, and dressed her in silk, 
And one little fairy said : 
" Dear Bessy, we've come to invite you to tea, 
Our food is as dainty as dainty can be, — 
Sweetest of honey and best of milk, — 
Come, for our table is spread." 






A TRUE STORY OF LIONS. 



41 



She woke with a start, and opened her eyes. 
When what do you think was her great surprise ? 
No fairy table was waiting near, 
And in place of her robe of silk 
She wore her white bonnet and pink gingham dress ; 
And instead of the fairy — do you think you can guess ? — 
Mamma and Carlo were standing there, 
With her bowl of bread and milk. 

GRACE S. BROWN. 




A TRUE STORY OF LIONS. 



Don't you want me to tell you about the queer sight I saw 
the other day at the menagerie ? Didn't I speak that big word 
well for a small boy ? Menageries are where you can see the fun- 
niest animals that ever lived anywhere. Some have horns on their 
noses, and there are others with humps on their backs. The 
creatures with humps are called camels. 

The best of all the animals were the lions and tigers. They 



42 



A TRUE STORY OF LIONS. 



were just nice, though. I will tell you why. Papa bought me a 
lovely tin turtle, painted blue, red, and yellow, and there was a 
spring inside of him that would wind up a string. When you 
threw the turtle, if you held one end of the string in your hand, 




he would come back 
just as if he were 
alive and liked to stay 
with small boys. 

Hundreds of people went past 
me, but did not even say, " Oh ! 

what a beautiful turtle your papa bought you for a dime ! " But 
when I came to the cage of lions — and papa says the lion is 
called the "King of Beasts" — I showed them my turtle. If 
they are kings they can't talk a mite in real language, only lion- 
talk, which I, of course, can't understand. But they said just as 
plainly as a lion could, with his kind-looking eyes, " What a beau- 
tiful turtle your papa bought you for a dime ! " I thought this a 
good deal for a king to say to a little boy. 



A TRUE STORY OF LIONS. 



43 



After this they raised their noses and smelt of my turtle ; then 
I gave him a little toss and the string wound up, and my turtle 
ran toward me. You never saw such surprised lions in all your 
life. I think they thought the turtle was alive. They sprang to 
their feet, and so did the Royal Bengal tigers that lived beside 
them. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lion acted just like kittens, they wanted to play 
with my turtle so. I felt very proud, and I made my turtle wind 
and unwind. A crowd of people formed around me to watch the 
lions and tigers play. Up and down the cages they ran, jumping 
over one another, and trying to get at my turtle. 

It made one just like those lions to see them so pleased with 
my handsome turtle. So I said to the man that cared for them, 
" Mr. Menagerie Man, I love your lions very much. Won't you 
please sell me one to go with my turtle ? I will be real kind to 
him, and see that he never goes hungry. He shall have a saucer 
of milk every time my little white kitten does, and he can sleep 
in the back yard with our dog Jip. I am sure Jip would not hurt 
him, and it would be very cosey for two in a kennel." 

Just then the crowd about me laughed so that I could not hear 

what the Menagerie Man said. I don't see any sense in people's 

laughing in that way at nothing. Papa said that we must move 

on if we wanted to see the rest of the show that day ; so you see 

I didn't get any lion for my own at all. 

a. s. cox. 




WHO TOLD? 




'Twas April, balmy, 
bright, 
And men, from early 
morn 
To night, had worked 
to turn the fuiTows 
Ready for the corn. 

And now 'twas plant- 
ing time, 
And Tim knew well 
indeed, 
His part would be in 
every hill to 
Drop a pumpkin-seed. 



Ah ! how the crows did caw 
That bright half-holiday ; 

So free to fly the whole land over, 
Near or far away ; 

While he must plod and stoop 

Over his weary round, 
Tucking the seeds, hill-top by hill-top, 

Safely in the ground. 

He sighed : " Who'd ever tell, 

Or who would ever know, 
If just so many seeds ain't really 

Planted in each row?" 



WHO TOLD ? 



45 



'No one ! And so he 
dug 
Out a great hollow 
space, 
And heaped the whole 

field's future pumpkins 
Together in one place. 



Who did tell? No one. But 



When sun and sweet, ' 



warm rain 
Had made the corn- 
field's long brown furrows 
,-j Green with growing grain 





In one far corner grew 

A most amazing mass 
Of stems and leaves, that told the story 

Only too well, alas ! 

Rank, twisted stems, and broad, 
Coarse leaves in tangles grew ; 

And how they came there, who had 
done it, 
All the people knew. 



They knew and laughed. To him 

It was a dreadful spot, 
And how even seeds can talk, he 
never 

In all his life forgot. 

MRS. CLARA DOTY BATES. 



PET IN THE COUNTRY. — II. 



PET IN MISCHIEF. 




how can Sugar 



m 



all 



UGAR turned out to be a fat little 
pug-dog, not more than two 
months old. In a few days Pet 
and he had become fast friends. 
So happy and good was Pet with 
her new playmate that grandma 
told grandpa she was the easiest 
child to take care of she had ever 
seen. 

One morning, when Pet woke 
up, it was raining hard. 

" Oh, clear ! 
and I amuse ourselves 
this rain?" she cried, mournfully. 

Grandma laughed. " You can play in the lumber-room if you will 
promise not to touch any of the things put away there," she said ; 
" and see, here is your doll. I unpacked her last night." 
" Oh, old Belle Paris ! " said Pet ; " I don't want her." 
" Poor Belle ! " grandma said. " You used to love her." 
" But Sugar is so much nicer, grandma. You don't have to 
squeeze him to make him cry, and he really, truly, eats without 
making believe." 

Grandma had nothing to say to this, so she left the two playmates 
in the big lumber-room, promising them some fresh cookies by and 
by, if they were good and did not get into mischief. They played 
"tag " very merrily for a while. But presently Pet got tired and sat 
down on a roll of carpet to rest, and Sugar lay down beside her. 

•' What a lot of old things there are in here, Sugar," said the little 
girl, looking around. " I wonder, when grandma said I wasn't to 
touch anything, whether she meant this funny little stool with the 
stuffed seat. It must have been grandma's when she was a little 
girl like me. 



PET IN THE COUNTRY. 



47 



" Sugar ! Stop tearing the fringe, you naughty dog, you ! 
There, I'm going to put it right back and be good. It's nice to be 
good, Sugar, you always feel so much better afterwards when you've 
been good. 




" Oh ! see this big picture, with its back turned. Why, Sugar, it's 
a looking-glass ! You never saw yourself in a looking-glass, did you, 
Sugar ? See, see, there you are ! " and with a great effort Pet 
turned the heavy mirror round and held it before the little dog. 

Sugar pricked up his ears and looked at himself very gravely for a 
moment ; then, suddenly, with a funny baby growl, he made a wild 
dash forward at what he thought was another puppy, who had no 
business there. 



48 



A GOOD THANKSGIVING. 



He smashed the glass and sent the frame clattering to the floor, 
when grandma, hearing the noise, came hurrying in. She found 
Pet crying, Sugar bleeding from a cut on his head, and her fine old 
mantel-glass broken to atoms. 

Pet didn't get any fresh cookies that afternoon, and Sugar was 
sent to the barn to have his head tied up by grandpa. Grandma 
said she thought Belle Paris was a safer playmate than Sugar for 
her little granddaughter. 

Pet had a good deal to think of that night. She had disobeyed 
grandma, and hurt her poor little dog, and broken the looking-glass. 

She told grandma how sorry she was, and went to sleep after 
being kissed and forgiven, with Belle Paris hugged tight in her arms. 

JESSIE McDERMOTT. 




l&^Wii'B!.»l\ 






) 



A GOOD THANKSGIVING. 



Bob White and his cousins, and neighbors all, 
Came out of the wood with pipe and call. 
Across the snow-field taking their way, 
To dine at the farm Thanksgiving day. 



A GOOD THANKSGIVING. 

On sped the flock in a ragged row. 
Leaving the print of their every toe ; 
Behind them lay, as it were, a line 
Of lace embroidery, pretty and fine. 



49 




So straight to the yard and through the bars ; 
Ten pullets cackled, " Now, my stars ! " 
Remembering then to be polite, 
They bowed and said, " You are welcome, quite. 

" Here is a plenty of scattered grain ; 
Bask in the sunshine and eat again ; 
Just there is a trough of water sweet ; 
Fly upon Bossy and warm your feet." 



50 



A GOOD THANKSGIVING. 



Soon out of the house came Jane and Will, 
With cousins Mary, and George, and Phil ; 
The children had dined right royally 
On breast of turkey and best mince pie. 

"Oh, here are the quails!" they, laughing, said, 
And peeped through the fence to see them spread, 




At the holiday feast, each speckled wing, 
And try with the fowls some notes to sing. 



A good thanksgiving for great and small. 
The empty crops stood out like a ball ; 
" We must be going," said Robert White, 
Then back over the field and out of sight. 



LAVINIA S. GOODWIN. 




Did you ever wonder why children 
always wish to do what grown peo- 
ple do ? Why the boys like to play 
soldiers, and farmers, and conductors, 
and doctors, and keep store just like 
papa ? Why the girls play " keep 
house," and bake, and sweep, and 
take care of the doll-children, and go 
visiting like mamma ? 

Sometimes there is nothing left to 




do or play, 
after a lono- 



At least, so it seems, 



storm, 



or during long 



or a long illness. 
Then is the time to think of mak- 
ing Christmas and birthday presents. 
One of those times had come to 
Carrie and Isabel. They had played 
in the barn during the long rainy 
morning, and could find nothing new 
or interesting to do. 

At last auntie hit upon a happy 
thought. She remembered 
how, when she was a little 
girl, some one had taught 
her to knit with a spool 
and some pins driven in 
one end of it. 

It was a very trouble- 
some way of doing it, for the pins would double up, or drop out. 




52 



LITTLE KNITTERS. 




Then patience would be lost^ with the stitches, and it would take 
a good deal of time to recover both of them. 

One day, not long since, she had seen in a store window some 
little toy-knitters, which would not fall apart, and so were much 
easier than the old-fashioned kind. 

When Isabel had taken up the long knitting-needles belonging 



LITTLE KNITTERS. 



53 



to mamma, she said, " I do wish some one would teach me." After 
a few desperate struggles she had put them down with a sigh. 
Then the thought of the little knitter in the window came into 
auntie's mind. 

Of course the little 
girls wanted it " right 
oft'," "this very after- 
noon," and " no matter 
if it does rain." Down 
the street ran two little 
pairs of rubber shoes, 
pattering with the rain 
drops. Two little chub 
by fists, each with a 
five-cent piece, surprised 
the little old woman 
who had not expected 
customers, especially 
such diminutive ones, in 
such weather. 

Back came two little 
rosy faces, in water- 
proof hoods, eager with 
desire. 

They were attentive 
pupils this time, and 
were soon running a 
race to see who could 
do the most in ten min- 
utes. 

After the sun came out once more, they took the knitters to 
the favorite apple-tree where they often played and read. They 
spent more time there than usual, this summer, making mats and 
reins together. If the robins and sparrows and bluebirds some- 
times came and watched them at their work, they were discreet 
enough never to disclose any secrets. 




54 



GO TO SLEEP, BABY! 



And one day, when they were going to see a little friend who 
had gone to a hospital for a little time on account of an injury, 
they could think of nothing so nice to carry her as one of the 
little toy-knitters. 



A. E. A. 




A form, white and ghost-like, 
Sits there in the room, — 

A make-believe phantom 
Outlined by the moon ! 

A long, mournful " Too-who ! " 
Why should you cower ? 

'Tis only an owl 

In the old church tower ! 



A flash and a nicker 
Across the white wall, 

'Tis the nurse, with a lamp. 
Outside in the hall ! 



GO TO SLEEP, BABY! 

Why listen and shudder ? 

Why shrink in alarm ? 
God's angels are watching 

To keep you from harm. 



55 




Then go to sleep, baby ! 

There's nothing to fear 
When all is so peaceful. 

And heaven so near ! 



FRANK H. STAUFFER. 



BABY BUMBLES AND DOTTIE DIMPLE. 




Baby Bumbles and Dottie Dimple are two tiny 
black-ancl-tan-colored dogs. 

They live in a family where there are no little 
children, so they are great pets. 

These happy little creatures do not have their 
own way in everything any more than you children 
do. 

They have little beds, on which 

they sleep every night, and they 

run and curl up on them just when 

their mistress tells them to. 

Then every day, as soon as dinner is over, they 

have a game of ball. 

H Do you wonder 
how little dogs can 
play ball? Well, I 
will tell you. 
Each little dog has a 
rubber ball for its very own. Dottie will 
not touch Baby's, nor Baby Dottie's. The 
balls are kept in a little box, and after dinner 
the dogs scamper off and get them. They carry 
them to the sitting-room and lay them at the 
feet of some one. Then they dance around, 
giving little sharp, quick barks, until the balls 
are picked up, and the game begins. 
The balls are 
thrown upon the floor, and, as they 
bounce, the dogs catch them in their 
mouths, and carry them up to be 
thrown again. 

This they keep up as long as any one 






BABY BUMBLES AND DOTTIE DIMPLE. 



57 



will play with them. When the game is over they put the balls 
away again in the little box. 

Baby Bumbles and Dottie Dimple, like other dogs, are very fond 
of bones. 




When your mother gives you a cooky, or a piece of bread with 
sugar on it, you don't scatter the crumbs all over the floor, do you ? 

No, you are a good little boy or girl, and sit still in one place until 
your cooky or bread is eaten up. 

Well, these little dogs are taught to be just as careful as you are. 
So, when bones are given them, they run off with them to their mats. 
Dottie has her mat, and Baby has his. 




Here they gnaw every bit of meat off, and make them so clean that 
they can take them to any part of the house. Little clean white 
bones are often found lying around on chairs and sofas. 

These little dogs go to ride, too, sitting up on the seat of the 
buggy, looking very wise. 

LINA STRONG. 



A FOX-HUNT. 



One bright morning in February, Jimmy Waugh heard 
noise and commotion. Hounds were in full cry ; men 
on horseback were riding rapidly about. Presently 
he saw what made his heart beat fast. A little 
gray-coated animal, with a bushy tail, ran up 
through the grove around the house where 
Jimmy lived. 

The poor fox was very tired ; he had had a 
long run through the open fields, and could 
scarcely drag one limb after another. His 
tongue hung out of his mouth, and he was 
panting for breath. The pack of dogs 
were close behind him, and soon he 
must feel their sharp teeth. But the 
cunning fox saw one way of escape. 
He ran up a large tree right in 
front of the house, and laj r there 



a great 




J%hineff- 



A FOX-BUNT. 



59 




on a limb, out of reach of 
the enemy. The hunters 
rode up and saw Reynard 
resting himself, but still 
panting for breath. " Give 
him a chance for his life," 
said one. " Let him take 
breath, and then we will 



run him again.' 



The eager clogs circled 
round the tree waiting for 
their prey, but presently 
the hunters called them off, 
and rode to a little distance. 



The fox crept down 
the tree, on the other 
side, after a while, and 
then the chase began 
again. Jimmy watched 
the horsemen and dogs 
as long as he could see 
them, but could not 
help wishing that the 
brave little fox should 
get off, after all ; he 
had made such a fight 
for his life. 

PINK HUNTER. 





WIDE-AWAKE TOWN. 

A bright summer day, 

And hard at his play 
Our baby rides gayly, in Wide-Awake Town ; 

His rocking-horse thin 

He fiercely reins in, 
And then sends him plunging anew, up and down. 



He rides to the shop, 

And says he can't stop, 
But won't Mr. Candyman send something nice? 

A bundle of toys 

To please little boys, 
And a bushel of bonbons, no matter what price ! 



WIDE-AWAKE TOWN. 61 



The postman to hail, 

With a box for the mail, 
Or off to the depot to meet dear papa ! 

For journeys of miles 

He thinks of with smiles ; 
To Phil on his rocking-horse nothing is far. 



'r> 



To fires he goes, 

And handles the hose, 
And helps the brave firemen ladders to run ; 

Or riding to war, 

Where brave soldiers are, 
He leads in the battle and shoulders a gun. 



o* 



To some quiet spot 

He makes believe trot, 
Where pastures and streamlets and " moolley cows " dwell ; 

Where wild flowers bloom, 

And scatter perfume, 
On purpose for country-bred urchins to smell. 

dear little Phil, 

If only you will, 
When in life's race your course you start on the track, 

Keep the same happy art 

Of " making up part," 
Delight and contentment you never will lack ! 

Because, after all, 

Whatever befall, 
Within is the source of our sunshine, be sure ; 

Good temper's the thing 

To crown a child king, 
And he who imagines the best will do more ! 

MARCIA BRADBURY JORDAN. 



* •/;/ 



V ^ I "'/ i 'Ml 

% ifi .' ,tu 



1,1 




jsymmmm* 



pip. 



Ah ! but Pip was a cunning chick ; so soft and downy, and two 
such bright, black eyes ! Polly thought him the very nicest little 
thing in all the world. She had such a tender little heart, that when 
Pip's mother was run over by the farm wagon she begged her 
grandpa for it. 

" I will be his mother," she said. 

Pip soon learned to know that he had only to cry " Peep, peep, 
peep ! " and Polly would run to him as fast as she could. He was 
very naughty about it, too, and would wake Polly at night very 
often, to give him some bread soaked in water. 

Polly would rub her sleepy eyes, and say : — 

" Pip, dear, if you just wouldn't get hungry at night ; " but she 
always gave him his bread-crumbs. 

When Polly's little friends came to ask her to go out to play, she 
would shake her head and say : — 

" I can't go, cause Pip gets so lonesome." 

One day grandma persuaded Polly to leave Pip long enough to go 
with her to visit a sick friend. 

" Take good care of Pip, mamma," said Polly ; and mamma prom- 
ised to be very careful. 

Pip sat on her hand while she wrote a letter, and pecked at her 
fingers until he grew tired. Then he tried to put bis little head 
under his wing to go to sleep. 

Mamma soon forgot all about him ; and when she came to look for 



PIP. 



63 



him found that he had slipped down into the folds of her dress and 

was dead. 

When Polly came home she ran into the house, crying : — 

" Where's my dear Pip ? " But poor Pip lay in mamma's hand, on 




his hack, with his little claws curled up, and his little eyes tightly 
closed. 

Then Polly cried until Uncle Bob took her on his knee and told 
her he would carve her a beautiful stone to put on Pip's grave. 

Polly dried her eyes and put Pip in a little box lined with cotton. 
Aunt Fan gave her a bunch of flowers tied with white ribbon. After 
the stone was finished, Polly printed on it, in her very best letters : — 



64 



PIP. 




"My Dear Pip, 

Aged Three Weeks." 

" I loved Pip ever so much," said Polly, afterwards, to her 
mamma ; " but I am real glad I can go out to play with the girls 
again ; and then, we had such a beautiful funeral ! " 

LOUISE THRUSH BROOKS. 



A Bolted Door 

May keep out tramps and burglars, but 
not Asthma, Bronchitis, Colds, Coughs, 
and Croup. The best protection against 
these unwelcome intruders is Ayer's 
Cherry Pectoral. With a bottle of this 
far-famed preparation at hand, Throat 
and Lung Troubles may be checked and 
serious Disease averted. 

Thomas 6. Edwards, M. D., Blanco, 
Texas, certifies : " Of the many prepa- 
rations before the public for the cure of 
colds, coughs, bronchitis, and kindred 
diseases, there are none, within the 
range of my experience and observation, 
so reliable as Ayer's Cherry Pectoral." 

John Meyer, Florence, 'W. Va., says : 
" I have used all your medicines, and 
keep them constantly in my house. I 
think Ayer's Cherry Pectoral saved my 
life some years ago." 

D. M. Bryant, M. D., Chicopee Falls, 
Mass., writes : " Ayer's Cherry Pectoral 
nas proved remarkably good in croup, 
ordinary colds, and whooping cough, 
and is invaluable as a family medicine." 



Ayer's Cherry Pectoral, 

PREPARED BY 

Dr. J. C. Ayer & Co., Lowell, Mass. 

Bold by all Druggists. Price $1; six bottles, $5, 




The SNOWBLACK are the best black Half-Hose In 
the market. They are of a fast and unfading color, soft 
and glossy, and so dyed as not to be tender. 

The SNOWBLACK are SHAWKNW, which are the 
best-fitting and most comfortable of Half-Hose. 



For sale by the trade generally, and to be ob- 
tained direct from the manufacturers, who will 
send, post-paid, Parcel Price-list on application. 

Shaw Stocking Co., 

LOWELL, MASS. 




'PENCERIAN 
'TEEL PENS 

Are the Best 



in the essential qualities of Durability, 
Mvenness of Points and Workman- 
ship. Sample card containing five leading 
styles of Pens sent for trial, on receipt of re- 
turn postage, 2 cents. Ask for card No. 9. 

ITTSON, BLAKEMAN & CO., 

753 & 755 Broadway, - - New York. 



FLORENCE 

Home Needle Work 




For 188S, is now ready. Contains ninety-six pages 
with nearly two hundred and fifty Illustrations. 

Subjects : Damask Stitches, Tapestry and Italian 
Embroidery, Drawn-Work, Darning, Crochet, etc. It 
teaches ladies how to make 

SOLID SILK BRAID 

for trimming their garments in the latest fashion. Boek 
mailed to any address on receipt of six cents. 

NONOTUCK SILK COMPANY, 

FLORENCE, MASS. 

18 Summer Street, - Boston, Mass. 




We're little lads and lassies gay, 
Pray to our song give ear ■ 

We've come a long and snowy way 
To sing of Christmas cheer. 

There's no day half so dear and glad, 

Alike to young and old ; 
We pray that no one may be sad, 

Or want for lack of gold. 



That each may have a merry heart, 

To greet this merry day. 
And pass a happy greeting on 

To all who come their way. 

For Christmas is no time for woe, 
'Tis a day for joy and cheer; 

It comes with wreathing greens and snow. 
To round the happy year. 




(SH^ISTMAS GREETING. 



LUNDBORG'S PERFUMES.. 

EDENIA. MARECHAL NIEL ROSE. ALPINE VIOLET. 

GOYA LILY. 

LUNDBORG'S RHENISH COLOGNE. 

DELICATE. REFINED. FRAGRANT. 



These Perfumes are for sale by almost all Druggists and Dealers in Toilet .Articles, but if, 
for any reason, they cannot be so obtained, send for a Price List to 

L^k-ZDID &D OOFFI3ST, 

PROPRIETORS AND MANUFACTURERS, 

24 BARCLAY ST., CORNER CHURCH ST., NEW YORK. 



^ AS GOES TEXAS^ 

p\ So Goes the Country. r\ 

The following convincing and enthusiastic lines, 
written by a resident of the "Lone Star" State, are 
copied from a Texas paper, and will be read with interest 
and pleasure by thousands whose experience enables 
them to vouch for the fact that there is as much truth as 
poetry in the composition: 

THEY ARE COMING. 



They are coming from the mansions of aristocratic 

"swells," 
Where the merry music maketh delectation for the 

belles, 

They are coming from the houses of the merchants, and 
the men 

Who are preachers, teachers, scientists, and those who 
wield the pen ; 

They are coming from the villas where our bankers love 

to dwell, 
From the happy smiling cottages in dingle and in dell ; 

From the cities, towns, and hamlets, and from every 
home and haunt, 

To buy Emerson Pianos, which will "fill a long felt 
want." 

They are coming, the mechanics, each a man who toils 
and strives, 

They are coming, the wage-earners, with their children 
and their wives, 

They are coming, careless cowboys, dapper clerks, and 
drummers, too, 

Each one bound to buy an Emerson — no other make 
will do. 

For solid happiness and peace each from its tone 
derives, 

And poetry begins to smile into prosaic lives, 

And they troop to Goggan Brothers or to one of their 
four branches, 

Those men who live in cities and those dwellers upon 
ranches. 

And the Emersons are coming from the city by the sea, 

The town that had a picnic when they spilled King 
George's tea ; 

They are coming by the car-load to fill this great 
demand, 

They are coming down to Galveston, by sea as well as 
land ; 

They are coming, too, to Waco, and to Houston, and to 
San 

Antonio, and to Austin, always foremost in the van — 

Five citadels of Emerson, upheld against all others, 

By the Texas "Gog and Magog," but known here as 



Goggan Brothers. 
Galveston, October, 



Viola Tour. 



THE EMERSON TIANO COMPANY have re- 
moved to their elegant new warerooms, No. 1 74: Tre- 
mont Street, Boston, Mass., where a full line of their latest 
styles in upright and square pianos may be found. 



TO SUBSCRIBERS OF 

Our Little Ones 

AND THE NURSERY. 




WE have had inquiries for a Binder for our Magazine, 
and to enable us to meet the wants of our subscri- 
bers, we have had manufactured a suoply of the Common 
Sense Binder, which, after careful investigation, we 
find to be the best in use. Those furnished by us are in 
cloth, with "Our Little Ones" in gilt, the inside lin- 
ings being the same as the bound volume. In this Bind- 
er the numbers of the Magazine can be placed each 
month as fast as they are received, thus making a bound 
book all the year. Having had a large number of these 
Binders made, we can offer them at one-third less than 
the regular retail price, and every reader of Our Little 
Ones should have one. 

Price, 50 cents, postage paid. 



RUSSELL PUBLISHING COMPANY, 
36 Bromfield Street, Boston, Mass. 




36 BROMFIELD ST., Boston, Mass. 



Magazine, Netcspaper and 
Specialty Advertising. 

Advertisements inserted in any" 
publication at publishers lowest 
rates. 

Special attention given to the 
preparation and illustration of ad- 
vertisements. 

Exclusive Advertising Agents foi 

"OUR LITTLE ONES AND THE NURSERY," 

Bound volumes" PIT k TTTJTJTJrVV " and other 
of LnAllHrvljUAj publication. 

specials SCRIBNER'S MAGAZINE; 
"THE CHAUTAUQUAN." 

" Household," " Cottage Hearth," 
" Babyhood," and 

"Good Housekeeping." 

Correspondence solicited and estimates furnished for any 
desired line of advertising. 

GEORGE A. FOXCROFT, 

Proprietor. 



PHILDREN WILL BRUSH THEIR TEETH 

■ with the Child's Prophylactic Tooth Brush (made of soft bristles and delicate enough for a 1 year 

■ ■ old babe) because it cleans all the teeth so perfectly. Every Dentist urges more care for the first 
^^B teeth. Nothing for cleaning the teeth lias ever hail the world wide endorsements of this brush. 
^^ Adults use the Prophylactic for natural teeth and The Florence Dental Plate Brush for artificial. 

For children from the age of 7 to 14 a special youths size is made. Descriptive circulars. 

Florence Manufacturing Company, Florence, Mass. 

Adults', Youths', and Childs' sizes kept by all Druggists and Dentists. 



JOSEPH GILLOTTS 

STEEL PENS 

Sold By ALL DEALERSThroughoutThe WORLD 
GOLD MEDAL PARIS EXPOSITION-I87S. 



CANDY 



Send §1.25, $2.10, or $3.50 for a su- 
perb box of candy by expr ess, prepaid, 
east of Denver or west of Boston. 
Suitable for presents. Sample orders 
solicited. Address, 

C. F. CUNTHER, Confectioner, 

2 I 2 State St., Chicago. 



PEERLESS DYES Are tbe BEST 



Sold by Druggists. 



UNIVERSITY a 3 R 5 G ?, N §5 F 5o. 



PiANOS fhom 

8150to$1500. 

Famous for Beauty, Sweetness, 
Durability. No Agent*. Sent 
from factory direct to purchaser. 
^ You save the enormous expenses 
icf agents. Guaranteed six 
1 yearn, and sent for trial in your 
(own home. VICTORIOUS for 
J SO YEARS. Cataloguefree.-' 

Kaichal ft Smith, 2 3 5 2. -let St. it. ? 





THE TOT THE CHILD LIKES BEST 




"Anchor" 
Stone 

Building 
Blocks, 



real stone, 
three colors. 

The BEST 
PRESENT for 
'children and 
, adults. 

For $1.75 or 
- -,-._. ,- S2.00 a good 
s: s5?g£^§2£ i average box. 

Apply for Descriptive Catalogue, sent post-free, to 
F- AD. RICHTER & CO., 

310 Broadway, New York. 



AMUSEMENT FOR ALL AGES. 




VACUUM TIPPED ARROW. 



CHILDREN are delighted with it. 
YOUNG Men and Maidens are captivated with it. 
AND OLD Men and Matrons take pleasure m it, or 
enioy It with their children and grand children. 

Itis a perfect Parlor Amusement, as there are no sharp 
points to break or mar the Furniture, and can be shot with 
safety even at your window. It will adhere wherever it 
strikes. Sold everywhere. • 

A Spring Steel Bow, Arrow, Butterfly Hanger and 
Oraduated Target, mailed post-paid for 50 cts.. orUm 
substituted for Bow, 85 cts. ELASTIC TIP CO., 
SoleMfrs. Comhill& Wash. Sts., Boston, Mass. 
Quick est selling thing i n the market for Agents ! I 



H0MBJ3 Y £IFT 

A POEM IN 

era* visit ^w.i&.iR.iE: 




Three Beauties — Knife, Fork™ Spoon 

IN SATIN LINED CASE, ABSOLUTELY 

IF" n. 3E3 3E3 2 — — 

One of the above sets will be sent, postpaid, as a 
premium, by TH K M ETHOPOLITAN, America's pop- 
nlar monthly, now in its fourth year of publication. 
The premium would cost you double the subscrip- 
tion. Pryor & Co., wholesale dealers in silver ware, 

"To the Manager of THE METROPOLITAN : 

Dear Sm :— The large lot of goods you have to-day pur- 
chased from us to be given away as premiums, must carry 
delight into thousands of homes. . . . You have secured 
a rare bargain for your subscribers." 

The present is one eminently suited to every 
household. The Queens of Society have noth- 
ing of the kind more beautiful, and nothing could 
be more welcome from the Husband to theWife, 
the Lover to his Sweetheart, the Mother to 
her Child, than this Holiday Gem. 

When you remember that you receive in addition 
to the above, one of the best Illustrated Home Ma- 
gazines in the country for a whole year for only 
Fifty cents, you cannot deny that it is an extraor- 
dinary inducement. Remit in postage stamps. Ad- 
dress THEMETROPOL1TAN, 33 Vesey 
Streets New York. 



BARNE^&IBERRY 



GATS LOG UE FREE. 

BARNEY &£ERr^SPR;ikGFIELD,MASS 



FOR X- MAS 




Latest French Novel- 
ty. Magic Wind-Mill 
Bcarf Pin. Elegant, 
unique.attractivejby 
mechanical motion. 
Wind- Mill revolves 
with great rapidity. 
Fine metal. Will not 
tarnish. No acids. 
Price, by mail, $1.25. 



Boys, Girls, Mothers, Fathers, 
Sisters, Cousins or Aunts 

who wish to get suitable X-MAS 
Presents for relatives or friends, 
can find exactly what they want in 
our Illustrated Catalogue, pre- 
pared specially for the holidays, 
which contains cuts and prices of 
Gymnasium Apparatus, Boxing 
Gloves, Chest and Athletic Suits, 
Skates, Sleds, Toboggans, Bicycles, 
Rowing Machines. Tvicycles,Veloci- 
pedes, Lawn Tennis, Base Ball,Wigs, 
Beards, Moustaches, Magicians' Ap- 
paratus, Magic Lanterns, Toys and 
everything for out and Indoor 
Sports. Sent post-paid for. 10c. 
Mention this Magazine. * 

Pecfc St Snyder, 124-26-28 Nassau St., N.T. 



MONEY MADE KEEPING HENS. 

Hundreds of farmers wlio never kept an account, would kill 
every " pesky hen " on the farm, if it was nut fur tile " women 
folks.'* The women intuitively know that the hens do not "eat 
their heads off every six months," but properly kept, pay 
better than any other farm animals. 

This is true. A record, simple 10 keep, so it would be used 
and show the facts in detail, would prove that everv hen paid 
a proht. They could be made to pay, from one to three dollars 
each. Mr. James L. Burgess, Nashua, Is. H., reported to the 
Nashua " Telegraph " that his wife made a clean net profit last 
year of $3ti iJJ on eggs alone, from only sixteen hens. He 
thinks her success was largely due to using Sheridan's Condi- 
tion Powder, a much advertised preparation to make hens lay. 

Do your hens pay like that? i>o you want to learn how to 
make them pay belter'/ Are you in delicate health, and want 
to commence poultry raising for the sake of open air employ- 
ment? If so, get some reliable advice how to do it. An 
enlarged and much improved Poultry Kaising Guide has just 
been printed. It contains practical information and many new 
features, which every person who keeps hens should have ; 
such as records and accounts for each month of the year. It 
also contains a long series of very valuable articles, by A. F. 
Hunter, " How to Make Money With a Few Hens.'* Of him 
the Lowell, Mass., Journal says: "The most sensible poultry 
literature we have read we find under the name of A. F. Hunter. 
He evidently knows what he is talking about." These two 
features alone are worth ten times the cost of the book ; which 
the publishers, I. S. Johnson & Co., 22 Custom House Street, 
Boston, Mass., send postpaid, for only 25 cents in stamps, or 
two 25-cent packs of Sheridan's Powder and the book for 60 
cents, rive packs $1; a large 2\ pound can of the Powder for 
$1.20 postpaid ; six cans $5, express prepaid. They will send a 
testimonial eircu ar free to any one. 



PEOPLE'S POPITLAS EDITION OF MISS MAMA 

PARLOA'S COOK BOOK 

Larpce Quarto, with handsome Chromo cover and 
containing all the receipts that appear in the expen- 
sive edition. Bv mailtonnv address for 3© cents. 

4 copies for $1.00. Send Postal Notes or Stamps. 

E. B. GOODNOW & CO.. Box 1687, BOSTON. 



AMERICAN HOUSEKEEPING. 
A Ladies' Home Journal. 

"The Beat Ladies' Magazine Published." 
20 pages with a colored cover each month. 
i Complete on all Home Subjects, Cook- 
ing, Decoration, F shions, Home Read- 
ing, etc. Send 50c. forthe Paper for One Year, and get our Cook 
Book, 326 pps. (Price SI) Free. Am. Housekeeping, Chicago, HL 




DYING GIRL'S 

List of Songs Free. H.. 



MESSAGE ami 1 OO othei 
Popular SON«S for lOcts. 
J.Wehman.ISO Parkiiow.N.Y. 



PEE1LESS DYES - Are th -° BEST " 



Suld by Druggists. 



"Best cure/or colds, coughs and consumption is the old Vege- 
table Pulmonary Balsam." Cutler Bros. & Co., Boston. For 
$1 by mail, a large bottle sent express paid. 



I/"%gr SPLENDID Embossed Scrap-Book Pictures, 
4«0 Pictures, 10c. POPE & CO., Montpelier, Vt. 



A Uril/ fflDT "WoNnEiJFtL!! Any one can draw all 
|«r WW fan 9 Piotures, Portraits, Sketches, from Na- 
—!-—!_ ture, etc.. mechanically (patented). A 

™^™"^™ M, ™ D '""™" child can learn. Taught by mail; stamp 
for Catalogue ; no postals. Agents wanted. EUGENE PEARL, 
Artist, 23 L'mii.n Square, New York. 



CROCHEF WORK: ^ r 



new and complete work of 
.p., fully illustrated. Full 
instructions for all kinds of Crocheting in Cotton, Linen, Silk 
and Wool. The most complete book published. Price 3i5c, 
postpaid. AYKSTKKN LACK 'MkXi. CO., 218 State Street, 
Chicago, 111. 



iriflrnV Tne only medicine known tbat 
lflWtllT wil1 cure Membranous Croup. 
IB.IVBILU B The pi . opri6tor of tl]is m edicine 

has used it hi [lis private practice twenty years, and in *>very 
ease of any kind of Croup it lias never failed to 
cure. The remedy is tasteless and harmless. .Sample with 
directions sent tret hi/ mail. Price, 50**. per box. 

C. A. ItHLDIX, M. !>., Jamaica, N. Y. 



14k GOLD 

DUEBER 

FILLED 

HUNTING 
CASE 

WATCH 

ONLY 

$16.45 

"We offer one of the finest quality regular Ladies' or Gents' 
size 34 Karat Gold Dueber tilled, Hunting Case Watches, 
warranted to wear 20 years, for only $16.46. Pendant bows, 
thumb-pieces and crowns are solid gold. These cases are 
manufactured of two thick plates of Solid Gold, 14 Karat fine 
(U. S. Mint Assay), covering an inner plate of line composition 
metal, which adds strength and durability to them, and are 
guaranteed to hold their color and wear equal to any Solid 
Gold Watch in the market. They are stem-winding, pendant 
set and fitted with genuine American, quick train move- 
ments (Elgin, Springfield or Trenton), which are thoroughly 
inspected and adjusted before leaving the factory, and warran- 
ted to be good time keepers. The newest model, contains the 
latest improvements and unsurpassed for durability, work- 
manship and accuracy of performance. These watches are 
fully guaranteed, aiid if any defect is found in the material 
or workmanship, they will fee exchanged or the money re- 
funded, as the purchaser may elect. The watch cannot be 
bought of any jeweler for less than S35. Will be sent by reg- 
istered mail, postage paid, on receipt of 816.45. or if desired 
will send by express C. O. D., with privilege of examination, 
if SI is sent as guarantee of good faith. Illustrated catalogue 
free. 

THE HARRIS WATCH CO., 

105 Fii'th Ave., Chicago, 111. 




THE BOUND VOLUME 



■ OF- 



Our Little Ones and the Nursery 

For the year Nov. 1887 to Oct. 1888, 



Jtlchly bound in Cloth, Starlet and Gold, 



IS NOW READY, PRICE, $2.50. 



AN ELEGANT PEESENT TOR THE HOLIDAYS. 



Sent , postage paid , on receipt of price. 

A limited number of volumes 5, 6, and 7 in uni- 
form binding with the above, can still be had and will 
be sent by mail, postpaid, to any address on receipt of 
price, $2.00. 

RUSSELL PUBLISHING CO. 

36 Bromfield Street, - BOSTON, MASS. 



PURE 




Its superior excellence proven in millions of homes for 
more than a quarter of a century. It is used by the United 
States Government. Endorsed by the beads of the Great 
Universities as the Strongest, Purest, and most Healthful. 
Dr. Price's the only Baking Powder that does not contain 
Ammonia, Lime, or Alum. Sold only in Cans. 

PRICE BAKING POWDER CO., 
NEW YORK. CHICAGO. ST. LOUIS. 



PEERLESS DYES 



Are the BEST. 

Sold by druggists. 




GOLD MEDAL, PAEIS, 1878. 

BAKER'S 



Warranted absolutely pure 
Cocoa, from -which the excess of 
Oil has been removed. It has three 
times the strength of Cocoa mixed 
■with Starch, Arrowroot or Sugar, 
and is therefore far more economi- 
cal, coating less than one cent a 
cup. It is delicious, nourishing, 
strengthening, easily digested, and 
admirably adapted for invalids as 
well as for persons in health. 
Sold by Grocers eve rywhere. 

BAKER & CO., Dorchester, Mass. 




FummS 



f? 



Perfectly Pure Extracts or Choicest Fruits, 
THE BEST, rnequalcd Strength for all.- 
Thousands of erross sold. "Winning friends 

everywhere. DKALfcKS TttKBLE SAIJ^S Willi TUEH. 



nURKEE'S 



GAU NTLEXB RAND 

».*" SPICES 

* MUSTARD. 

SOLD ONLY IN FULL WEIGHT SEALED PACKAGES. 

Guaranteed absolutely pure, and warranted to excel 
all others in strength, richness, flavor and cleanliness. 



& 



♦. 



**i 



5MAD 
DRESS INC" 





OYS 



Ngw*3 your time to get up clubs 
for our celebra ted, {foods and pro- 
cure a Beautiful Watch — 
Stem Winder and stem 

Setter — Imported Swiss Move- 
ment. Just the watch, for boys. We have in stock a 
large line of premiums for all. For full particulars 
address The Great American Tea Co. 

P. O. Box 289. 31 & 33 Vesey St., New York, N. Y. 



PLEASE REMEMBER THAT 

ESPEY'S FRAGRANT CREAM 

ii the finest and heat preparation In the worid for 
Chupped Hutids and J£ontrh Skin. Has the 
largest sale, gives better ssitisfaction than any 
other urtif Ip. I*pware of imitatinnR claiming to be 
the same thing or ju.-:t aa gene sold everywhere. 



S...'~»e-.d5lighi. of. .epicures." 
HREW.SB-URY i 
! TomaloketcluiiJ' |\ 

<M '■ '.i Fl R S*l" MArturAtTu-REb-.-fTRtiri ■'■•■■ 

l&^r he FRESHER L/m- "*^ 

-■ y.:'y-nv^ 'V. TH. HOT &.' COLO. CUTS, OYST-ER'S^-tlV-'ft.T-lS'H -&C. 
'T^f.'-vt. i' SUPERIOR FLAVO^.-TO'GRAVI^So'&r-: PREPARE VIOnor'M EAT- 
■ - '■"" ' ■' ' 7 A»n AT,' B7:muD5onST.NY .• Z ot.B'oA >: Ben; -Free 



'A 



i j I ROSES AMORITA, MAY BLOSSOM, EUXE- 
/ NIA, Heliotrope and Jockey Club are favorites 



4! 
among Stearns' Fine Perfumes, which are tin- 
equalled in fragrance, permanence and delicacy. 
Four sizes 10c, 25c, 50c and $1.00. STEARNS' SACHETS 
surpass all in elegance and fragrance; 25 and 50c. packages. 
STEARNS' FACE POWDER is supurh; in, 25 and 50c sizes. 
Sold by all druggists. Trial samples mailed for 10c in stamps; 
all regular sizes on receipt of price.. Mention paper. 

F. STEARNS & CO., Detroit, Mich. 




And so" good housewife^ 

were I you 
I'd keep the love- dont^ 

you think so 
But mix it with - 



YOU CAN ADD TO THIS LIST OF THE USES OF 

SAPOLIO 



EVERY ONE FINDS A NEW USE. 



To clean tombstones. 
To polish knives. 
To renew oil-cloth. 
To brighten metals. 
To scour bath-tubs. 
To whiten marble. 



To scrub floors. 
To renovate paint. 
To wash out sinks. 
To clean dishes. 
To scour kettles. 
To remove rust. 



EVERYBODY USES IT. 



Dentists to clean false teeth. 

Surgeons to polish, their instruments. 
Confectioners to scour their pans. 

Mechanics to brighten their toolg. 

Engineers to clean parts of machines. 

Ministers to renovate old chapels. 
Sextons to clean the tombstones. 

Hostlers on brasses and white horses. 
Painters to clean off surfaces. 

Soldiers to brighten their arms* 

Artists to clean their palettes* 

Cooks to clean the kitchen sink. 

Housemaids to scrub the marble floors 
Chemists to remove some stains. 

Carvers to sharpen their knives. 

Shrewd ones to scour old straw hats. 



Almost ag Palatable as Cream . 
CHILDREN 




MOTHERS should give their CHILDREN Dr. Wilbor's Compound of 

Pure Cod-Liver Oil with Phosphates 

OF LIME, SODA, IRON, FOR HEALTH AND STRENGTH. 

Preserve the children's golden moments, And if you'd have them strong and healthy 

Guard well their precious lives, Have Wilbor's Compound always ready. 

Be sure as you value their health and get the genuine "WTLBOR'S," it assimilates with the food, 

increases the flesh and appetite, restores energy to mind and body, throws oil" Scrofulous Humors, 

cures Coughs, Colds, Debility and Wasting Diseases. Manufactured only by Dr. A. B. 

"WILBOR, Chemist, Boston, Mass. Send for Illustrated Circular. 



4- 



-fc* 





^^^^^ffi 



Bakin< 
Powder 



T *' "»' " "-— ■»*" T 



t • - * - 1- -• - 



i i i i ' 



I J .1.11 MIMII ■ 



ABSOLUTELY PURE 





*■ i 1-1 - 



J 



or QuicK Raisingy 
It 15 ^Superior to 
All Other Leavening 
Agents- -«5aves Flour 
Time Patience and 
Health- -Never Fails to 
MaKe Light ^5weet Del* 
icious and v * nolesome 
Food 



Os*.. 



««- 



-^